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Tom Eigelsbach
Works at Hangouts/Skype Math Tutor and Science/Sci-fi Geek.
Attended Vulcan Academy of Science
Lives in Washington, DC, USA
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Tom Eigelsbach

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UVA Med School researchers have determined that the brain is directly connected to the immune system by vessels previously thought not to exist.

Kevin Lee, PhD, chairman of the UVA Department of Neuroscience, described his reaction to the discovery: "The first time these guys showed me the basic result, I just said one sentence: 'They'll have to change the textbooks.' There has never been a lymphatic system for the central nervous system, and it was very clear from that first singular observation - and they've done many studies since then to bolster the finding - that it will fundamentally change the way people look at the central nervous system's relationship with the immune system."

"Instead of asking, 'How do we study the immune response of the brain?' 'Why do multiple sclerosis patients have the immune attacks?' now we can approach this mechanistically. Because the brain is like every other tissue connected to the peripheral immune system through meningeal lymphatic vessels," said Jonathan Kipnis, PhD, professor in the UVA Department of Neuroscience and director of UVA's Center for Brain Immunology and Glia (BIG). "It changes entirely the way we perceive the neuro-immune interaction. We always perceived it before as something esoteric that can't be studied. But now we can ask mechanistic questions."

The unexpected presence of the lymphatic vessels raises a tremendous number of questions that now need answers, both about the workings of the brain and the diseases that plague it. For example, take Alzheimer's disease. "In Alzheimer's, there are accumulations of big protein chunks in the brain," Kipnis said. "We think they may be accumulating in the brain because they're not being efficiently removed by these vessels." He noted that the vessels look different with age, so the role they play in aging is another avenue to explore. And there's an enormous array of other neurological diseases, from autism to multiple sclerosis, that must be reconsidered in light of the presence of something science insisted did not exist.

#biology   #neuroscience   #scienceeveryday   #sciencesunday  
In a stunning discovery that overturns decades of textbook teaching, researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have determined that the brain is directly connected to the immune system by vessels previously thought not to exist. The discovery could have profound implications for diseases from autism to Alzheimer's to multiple sclerosis.
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NEW VIDEO! Upside Down Mountains in Real Life
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Cosmic inflation is a theory that was proposed in the 1980s by cosmologist Alan Guth to answer some of the most fundamental questions of the origins of our universe. It also solved the Horizon Problem and the Flatness Problem.
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I am strongly against bottled water, having never paid for one in my entire life. But I approve of canned water (and unlike the plastic, the cans are way more environmentally friendly) by the number one largest beer producer in the world taking a break brewing their crappy beer in order to help people in need in a crisis by using their brewery to can water (call it "Bud-Extra-Lite"). Really, this is a spectacular and compassionate move by the huge beer manufacturer. 

Anheuser-Busch stopped beer production in Georgia late Wednesday night to produce 50,000 cans of water for the American Red Cross. "Right now our production line is running emergency drinking water instead of beer," said Cartersville brewery manager Rob Haas. In fact, the Cartersville brewery produces cans of emergency relief water a few times a year, Haas said, partnering with the Red Cross to provide to places in need within the United States. "It's something we're uniquely positioned to do in a very timely period," he said.
Anheuser-Busch says it has stopped beer production at a Georgia brewery to produce thousands of cans of water for the American Red Cross.
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What about a top or cap? I see more water being wasted with a can.
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This is a new use of an old trick, the mechanism that makes grandfather clocks work, except applied to lamps. You 'wind it up' by raising a sandbag, which slowly drops, powering a generator that gives you a half-hour of light. Great idea for folks in places like Kenya where they commonly don't have electricity, and it's far superior to kerosene lamps and doesn't burn any fuel. Would be perfect for camping trips as well.
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Testing the theory that conspiracy theorists will largely only discuss, share, and believe theories of other conspiracy theorists, scientists posted nearly 5,000 comments on Facebook, trolling conspiracy and science news pages with crazy rumors. YouTube user Rebecca Watson aka Skepchick discusses this study in her latest video on conspiracy theorists.
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+Fred Blonder Makes you wonder what else they call work...
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The software for the guidance computer, which was placed in both the command module and the lunar module, for navigation assistance and to control the spacecraft, was written by a team at the MIT Instrumentation Laboratory (now the Draper Laboratory) headed up by Margaret Hamilton. Hamilton's code was good — so good, in fact that it very well might have saved the entire Apollo 11 mission.

The process of actually coding in the programs was laborious as well. The guidance computer used something known as "core rope memory": wires were roped through metal cores in a particular way to store code in binary. "If the wire goes through the core, it represents a one." Hamilton explained in the documentary Moon Machines. "And around the core it represents a zero." The programs were woven together by hand in factories. And because the factory workers were mostly women, core rope memory became known by engineers as "LOL memory," LOL standing for "little old lady."

Hamilton is now 78 and runs Hamilton Technologies, Inc., the Cambridge, Massachusetts-based company she founded in 1986. She's lived to see "software engineering" — a term she coined — grow from a relative backwater in computing into a prestigious profession. "I began to use the term 'software engineering' to distinguish it from hardware and other kinds of engineering," Hamilton said.

In the early days, women were often assigned software tasks because software just wasn't viewed as very important. "It’s not that managers of yore respected women more than they do now," Rose Eveleth writes in a great piece on early women programmers for Smithsonian magazine. "They simply saw computer programming as an easy job. It was like typing or filing to them and the development of software was less important than the development of hardware. So women wrote software, programmed, and even told their male colleagues how to make the hardware better."
The Apollo 11 lunar lander's computer almost faltered — but her great code saved it.
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An estimated 8,000 students from China were expelled from universities and colleges across the United States in 2013-4. The vast majority of these students — around 80% — were removed due to cheating or failing their classes.

Chinese students have become a big market in the United States—and nobody understands this better than the universities themselves. Over 60% of Chinese students cover the full cost of an American university education themselves, effectively subsidizing the education of their lower-income American peers. Some schools — such as Purdue — profit further by charging additional fees for international students.

According to Zinch China, an education consulting company, 90% of Chinese applicants submit fake recommendations, 70% have other people write their essays, 50% have forged high school transcripts, and 10% list academic awards and other achievements they did not receive. As a result, many students arrive in the U.S. and find that their English isn’t even good enough to follow lectures or write papers. Until recently, American schools have been happy to look the other way. 

The Chinese government has invested billions of dollars in improving its own tertiary education system in an attempt to persuade students to remain in the country. China is beefing up their labs, their research, while in the U.S. they've cut back. At the grad level, students are staying in China because now they're starting to be able to compete. For American universities, expelling Chinese students may someday be an overture to a bigger problem — them not coming at all.
A new report estimates that 8,000 students from China were expelled in the 2013-4 school year. That’s bad news for U.S. schools.
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France approved a law last week that requires the roofs of new commercial buildings be covered—at least in part—by either solar panels or plants.

Green roofs have gained popularity in recent years as more cities worldwide promote their use as a way to save energy. Some, including Canada's Toronto or Switzerland's Basel, even mandate rooftop vegetation in building bylaws.

Advocates say these roofs—whether bedecked in sedums, vegetable plants, or wildflowers—help insulate buildings and thereby reduce the need for both heating and air conditioning.

The impact can be substantial. A study this week by Spanish researchers found that dense foliage can reduce the heat entering a building through the roof by 60 percent and act as a passive cooling system.

Green roofs help reduce runoff by retaining rainwater and improve air quality by absorbing pollutants. By taking in more heat during the day than they can release overnight, the plant-covered surfaces can also lower the "heat island" effect in urban areas that are warmed by asphalt roads and tar roofs. (Green walls offer similar benefits.)

In densely-developed cities, they also offer birds a place to nest and people a place to grow food. Green roofs cost more to install and maintain, and their price and complexity deter many homeowners and developers. Yet a 2008 University of Michigan study found that their benefits, including a longer-than-average lifespan, more than offset the extra up-front investment.
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Explosive geysers of material that shoot away from black holes at nearly the speed of light seem to form more often in galaxies that are the product of two galaxies merging together, according to a new study using data from the Hubble Space Telescope.
Explosive geysers of material that shoot away from black holes at nearly the speed of light seem to form more often in galaxies that are the product of two galaxies merging together, according to a new study using data from the Hubble Space Telescope.
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Engaging pilot. Great story; fascinating characters. Premiers June 24, but the pilot is available now from hackers and other online sources. Can't wait to watch more.

A lot of that attention to detail comes courtesy of creator and executive producer Sam Esmail, who, it turns out, has similar feelings about the way computers have been portrayed in the past. "I’m sorry, but every movie and show about hacking is so fucking terrible!" he said in the post-screening Q&A. "And they feel like they have to do all these CGI graphics, and you’re like, ‘Hacking doesn’t look anything remotely like that.’ I’m sorry, Chris Hemsworth does not look like a hacker."

While attempting to take the technology seriously is a big part of what makes Mr. Robot work, there’s something more important in play: the awareness that no amount of visual effects or spectacle will make hacking exciting if the characters are boring and the stories bland. Elliot is an unnerving loner, but not of the stuck-in-mom’s-basement variety we’re used to seeing. He’s got a drug problem, potentially a dissociative disorder, and while he’s going to therapy, he can’t help but spend his time analyzing his therapist instead. The way Malek plays him, Elliot is a manipulator of social mechanics first and foremost, and while he can’t sustain a conversation with somebody he cares about, he can play a total stranger to gain access to their thoughts, their feelings, or their personal information.

There’s also a blessed lack of over-explanation. When a company is hit with a DDOS attack, there’s no vanilla breakdown of what that is, and when a rootkit is discovered in a system later in the show, things don’t immediately grind to a halt so a supporting character can explain the concept. Esmail expects the viewer to keep up on their own, and the show makes it clear early on that it won’t do a lot to help you out if you can’t.
The portrayal of "hacking" has been abysmal in movies and television ever since Will Smith and Jeff Goldblum took down an alien invasion with a PowerBook in Independence Day. There’s something...
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Digital Dexter.
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  • Vulcan Academy of Science
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TVTom
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✔ Certified Skeptic, Gamer, Philosopher, Sci-fi/Science Geek, Math Tutor
Introduction
"It is in the admission of ignorance and the admission of uncertainty that there is a hope for the continuous motion of human beings in some direction that doesn't get confined, permanently blocked, as it has so many times before in various periods in the history of man." 
— Richard P. Feynman
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I love science. I love math.
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    Math Tutor, present
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Stephen Colbert Interviews Neil DeGrasse Tyson | PsiVid, Scientific Amer...
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Stephen Colbert is a smart science fan and often features great science book authors and scientists on his show, The Colbert Report. I also

Welcome to Looney Labs!
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Seven Dragons. Featuring the artwork of Larry Elmore! Seven Dragons is a fast domino-like card game, where players attempt to be the first t

Watch: Colbert Interviews deGrasse Tyson - STEM Education (usnews.com)
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Watch Stephen Colbert, who is out of character, interview Neil deGrasse Tyson about science.

watch it: Stephen Colbert interviews Neil deGrasse Tyson | MaryAnn Johan...
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Colbert is out of character, deGrasse Tyson is funny and passionate. It’s long but well worth the time...

Neil deGrasse Tyson Challenges Climate Change Deniers
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Neil deGrasse Tyson -- known as the "sexiest" astrophysicist alive, host of Nova ScienceNow on PBS, and Stephen Colbert's favo

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This is the best Indian restaurant I've ever been to. It's also the best buffet of any cuisine I know of in the DC-Baltimore area, as long as you love Indian cuisine. The serve a buffet 7 days a week at a cost of $11 or $13 on weekends. Their weekend buffets are the best, however. I had three insanely wonderful dishes last time I was at the Curry Leaf for lunch on a Saturday. An okra dish that was out of this world. Same with the eggplant dish. And an outstanding cauliflower dish. Any of those three I'd consider batter than any dish at any Indian restaurant I've ever eaten at, and they had them all. They also had meat dishes, but I don't eat meat. And a dessert that was different from the usual India desserts, but it was delicious. My one problem was I had to pull myself away when I was full, because it was so good I just wanted to eat more. And on top of that, you are allowed to bring your own beer or wine with you and there is no 'corking' fee. So while this is above average what I usually want to pay for lunch, what you save from bringing your own bottle of wine to share makes up for it, as a $10 bottle of wine will usually cost you $30 or more in a restaurant. Hence, I'll bring along some of my favorite craft beer or a good bottle of wine to share, making this both my go-to place for special occasions with friends as well as my current favorite restaurant.
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Public - 4 months ago
reviewed 4 months ago
This is a great place to eat, given a couple of qualifications. It's got some really wonderful dishes that make it worthwhile. Most of the stuff they serve is mediocre and not very good, but as it's a buffet, if you know what the few really good ones are, that makes no difference, and you'll get a fantastic deal. You can take what you don't eat home, or get an extra plateful to go, or just get food to go for only $4 a pound ($6 for meat/fish). That's a great deal, and I usually get a plateful of stir-fry veggies to take home for another meal. Also, even the mediocre food is a plus if you bring finicky friends or finicky kids: they have plenty of junk food (pizza, french fries, fried chicken nuggets), plus plenty of stuff for vegans and vegetarians, plus lots of normal chinese dishes from lo mein to beef & broccoli, Everybody will like something here. The Hibachi stir fry is fantastic: you pick your own selection of veggies (and/or meats and eggs), and they have a good selection including snow peas and fresh mushrooms, and they'll cook it in front of you, and add whatever sauces you want or lots of garlic if you wish. Worth it if this is all you get. The sushi is good. Mostly California roll kinds of sushi, maybe a dozen varieties, with a couple of them vegan and several with cooked rather than raw fish. More than worth it just for the sushi alone. The salad bar is way above average, better than any of the ones you see in the supermarket for $5 or $6 a pound, with more variety, except this is all you can eat or only $4 a pound to take home, so that's worth it if you only eat salad, or bring along friends on a diet who just want to eat salad. Just order water. Soft drinks are expensive, though it's an all you can drink deal, but seriously, why the extra calories of sugar water to fill you when there's all the good food that comes with the package plan. I just get water and add lemon slices. Or maybe I'll order hot tea if I'm in the mood, but that's extra too. And I skip the desserts. There are tons of them, none that interesting, but usually at least two varieties of chocolate cake, which will make kids happy. And there are a few other really top-notch dishes, such as the string beans (always just perfectly crispy and not overcooked) or the small clams in the shell which is delicious, or the spinach and cheese dish which they hilariously always misspell as "Spanish Cheese." The rest of the stuff is mostly mediocre, but just sample and find the few really good dishes they serve, and ignore the rest, and you'll love the place. As for bad reviews and complaints about the service, all the waitress does is bring you water and take your used plates. It's a *buffet,* folks! On a rare occasion at peak hours you have to wait a minute or two in line because you pay at the start a one-price fits all, which is an amazing price, btw: $7.00 including tax with the dollar off value-pak monthly coupon in the mail, or $10.00 including tax with the coupon for $1.50 off after 3:30 for dinner or all Sunday. But if you go Sunday afternoon expect a big line to get in -- but that's because half the poor folks in that part of the county take their families there after church! They are doing a huge service to offer all this good food with tons of salad and veggies that poor families can afford instead of a greasy bucket of fried chicken at a fast food restaurant. It's the best cheap after-church family buffet in town. So it gets five stars from me. No, it's not the place to impress your date with, but it is a great place to go alone, or with a big family or group of friends where everyone will find something they like, or to get a great carry out stir fry.
• • •
Public - 4 months ago
reviewed 4 months ago
2 reviews
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