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Tom Eigelsbach
Works at Hangouts/Skype Math Tutor and Science/Sci-fi Geek.
Attended Vulcan Academy of Science
Lives in Washington, DC, USA
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Original Greek statues were brightly painted, but after thousands of years, those paints have worn away. Shining a light on the statues can be all that’s required to see them as they were thousands of years ago. A lamp is positioned carefully enough that the path of the light is almost parallel to the surface of the object. When used on paintings, this makes brushstrokes, grit, and dust obvious. On statues, the effect is more subtle. Brushstrokes are impossible to see, but because different paints wear off at different rates, the stone is raised in some places – protected from erosion by its cap of paint – and lowered in others. Elaborate patterns become visible.

Ultraviolet is also used to discern patterns. UV light makes many organic compounds fluoresce. Art dealers use UV lights to check if art has been touched up, since older paints have a lot of organic compounds and modern paints have relatively little. On ancient Greek statues, tiny fragments of pigment still left on the surface glow bright, illuminating more detailed patterns.
EMN is a world-class collective of award-winning journalists and researchers whose mission is to be the leading online live streaming news network for alternative news and information. This news and research-driven force will be the recognized source for inquiring minds. From the paranormal to the supernormal, inner space to outer space, whether groundbreaking scientific discoveries or research into the world of the unexplained; EMN is the gatewa...
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J.J. Abrams, who directed Anton Yelchin, who has died at 27 in a freak accident, in 2009’s “Star Trek” and 2013’s “Star Trek Into Darkness,” tweeted a photo of a handwritten note that reads: “You were brilliant. You were kind. You were funny as hell. And you weren’t here nearly long enough. Missing you, JJ.”
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so apparently he drove a manual transmission
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That would mean you do care as much as it's possible to care
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Clearly, you need 42 things to make a heap. 
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Many people are put off by the obscure symbols and strict rules of math, giving up on a problem as soon as they see both numbers and letters involved. But
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The star closest to the sun hosts a planet that may be very much like Earth. Click through to watch the video.

Astronomers have discovered a roughly Earth-size alien world around Proxima Centauri, which lies just 4.2 light-years from our own solar system. What's even more exciting, study team members said, is that the planet, known as Proxima b, circles in the star's "habitable zone" — the range of distances at which liquid water could be stable on a world's surface.

"We hope these findings inspire future generations to keep looking beyond the stars," lead author Guillem Anglada-Escude, a physics and astronomy lecturer at Queen Mary University of London, said in a statement. "The search for life on Proxima b comes next."
Astronomers have discovered an Earth-sized alien world around the star Proxima Centauri, which lies just 4.2 light-years from our own solar system.
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I would sooooo give up the money
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no its unfere
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The short answer is every 19 years. Well, it's a little more complicated than that, but basically, the 19 year Metonic cycle is one of those cool math tricks you learn in astronomy, and it applies tonight. Last night a lovely friend and I drank wine until the wee hours outside watching the moon from my backyard. It was bright and beautiful, and will be tonight as well. From the article:

The Moon goes through a full phase of cycles (from full to new and full again) in about 29.53 days. One Earth year is, on average, about 365.24 days long. But there’s a funny coincidence here: 19 years is 6,939.56 days, and that is almost a perfect multiple of 29.53! Nineteen years is almost exactly 235 lunar phase cycles. That means that when you have a full Moon on a given date, 19 years later it’ll be on that same date once again. That’s what’s called the Metonic cycle. This fact has been known for about 2,500 years, which is pretty amazing.
Monday we have both the June (summer) solstice and a full Moon. This happens only every 19 years at best.
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Cognitive Dissonance theory was first developed by psychologist Leon Festinger in 1956. The subject of his research was a doomsday cult led by a Chicago housewife named Dorothy Martin (Martin had previously been involved in L. Ron Hubbard’s Dianetics movement, and incorporated ideas from what later became Scientology). Martin claimed that she had been contacted by extraterrestrials about Earth’s imminent destruction, and that the followers of her movement would be the only survivors.

Festinger, during his investigations, infiltrated the cult and became a first-hand witness to the group’s behavior in the wake of the failed prophesy. He found that instead of abandoning the prophesy and admitting error, the group rationalized that the extraterrestrials must have saved the world, thus ensuring the survival of the cult.

Festinger suggested that updating a belief with new information is far easier than revising it completely (See my other post regarding belief revision: https://plus.google.com/+ColinFish/posts/NoXrZkA8CcZ ). In other words, the stress associated with cognitive dissonance could be more easily alleviated by maintaining the belief rather than abandoning it.

Festinger and his co-authors concluded that the following conditions lead to increased conviction in beliefs following disconfirmation:

1.) The belief must be held with deep conviction and be relevant to the believer's actions or behavior.
2.) The belief must have produced actions that are difficult to undo.
3.) The belief must be sufficiently specific and concerned with the real world such that it can be clearly disconfirmed.
4.) The disconfirmatory evidence must be recognized by the believer.
5.) The believer must have social support from other believers

#psychology #science #confirmationbias #cognitivedissonance #cult #belief #research

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My favourite line from Kevin Smith's "Dogma"

Rufus: He still digs humanity, but it bothers Him to see the shit that gets carried out in His name - wars, bigotry, televangelism. But especially the factioning of all the religions. He said humanity took a good idea and, like always, built a belief structure on it.

Bethany: Having beliefs isn't good?

Rufus: I think it's better to have ideas. You can change an idea. Changing a belief is trickier...
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✔ Certified Skeptic, Gamer, Philosopher, Sci-fi/Science Geek, Math Tutor
Introduction
"It is in the admission of ignorance and the admission of uncertainty that there is a hope for the continuous motion of human beings in some direction that doesn't get confined, permanently blocked, as it has so many times before in various periods in the history of man." 
— Richard P. Feynman
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I love science. I love math.
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  • Vulcan Academy of Science
    Philosophy
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TVTom
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Math Tutor
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  • Hangouts/Skype Math Tutor and Science/Sci-fi Geek.
    Math Tutor, present
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Washington, DC, USA
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Greenbelt, MD
Tom Eigelsbach's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
COSMOSonTV
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The official Google+ for COSMOS.

Stephen Colbert Interviews Neil DeGrasse Tyson | PsiVid, Scientific Amer...
blogs.scientificamerican.com

Stephen Colbert is a smart science fan and often features great science book authors and scientists on his show, The Colbert Report. I also

Welcome to Looney Labs!
www.looneylabs.com

Seven Dragons. Featuring the artwork of Larry Elmore! Seven Dragons is a fast domino-like card game, where players attempt to be the first t

Watch: Colbert Interviews deGrasse Tyson - STEM Education (usnews.com)
www.usnews.com

Watch Stephen Colbert, who is out of character, interview Neil deGrasse Tyson about science.

watch it: Stephen Colbert interviews Neil deGrasse Tyson | MaryAnn Johan...
www.flickfilosopher.com

Colbert is out of character, deGrasse Tyson is funny and passionate. It’s long but well worth the time...

Explore Arabia with Amalia! The Arabic Alphabet
arabiangazette.com

Amalia Costin, a self-taught Arabic language expert, explores the ins and outs of the Arabic language and culture in an engaging and informa

Science Saved My Soul
marcalandimartino.wordpress.com

One thing I love about the Internet is that no matter how much cool stuff you come across there's always something that makes you think, "Ho

This is the best Indian restaurant I've ever been to. It's also the best buffet of any cuisine I know of in the DC-Baltimore area, as long as you love Indian cuisine. The serve a buffet 7 days a week at a cost of $11 or $13 on weekends. Their weekend buffets are the best, however. I had three insanely wonderful dishes last time I was at the Curry Leaf for lunch on a Saturday. An okra dish that was out of this world. Same with the eggplant dish. And an outstanding cauliflower dish. Any of those three I'd consider batter than any dish at any Indian restaurant I've ever eaten at, and they had them all. They also had meat dishes, but I don't eat meat. And a dessert that was different from the usual India desserts, but it was delicious. My one problem was I had to pull myself away when I was full, because it was so good I just wanted to eat more. And on top of that, you are allowed to bring your own beer or wine with you and there is no 'corking' fee. So while this is above average what I usually want to pay for lunch, what you save from bringing your own bottle of wine to share makes up for it, as a $10 bottle of wine will usually cost you $30 or more in a restaurant. Hence, I'll bring along some of my favorite craft beer or a good bottle of wine to share, making this both my go-to place for special occasions with friends as well as my current favorite restaurant.
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
This is a great place to eat, given a couple of qualifications. It's got some really wonderful dishes that make it worthwhile. Most of the stuff they serve is mediocre and not very good, but as it's a buffet, if you know what the few really good ones are, that makes no difference, and you'll get a fantastic deal. You can take what you don't eat home, or get an extra plateful to go, or just get food to go for only $4 a pound ($6 for meat/fish). That's a great deal, and I usually get a plateful of stir-fry veggies to take home for another meal. Also, even the mediocre food is a plus if you bring finicky friends or finicky kids: they have plenty of junk food (pizza, french fries, fried chicken nuggets), plus plenty of stuff for vegans and vegetarians, plus lots of normal chinese dishes from lo mein to beef & broccoli, Everybody will like something here. The Hibachi stir fry is fantastic: you pick your own selection of veggies (and/or meats and eggs), and they have a good selection including snow peas and fresh mushrooms, and they'll cook it in front of you, and add whatever sauces you want or lots of garlic if you wish. Worth it if this is all you get. The sushi is good. Mostly California roll kinds of sushi, maybe a dozen varieties, with a couple of them vegan and several with cooked rather than raw fish. More than worth it just for the sushi alone. The salad bar is way above average, better than any of the ones you see in the supermarket for $5 or $6 a pound, with more variety, except this is all you can eat or only $4 a pound to take home, so that's worth it if you only eat salad, or bring along friends on a diet who just want to eat salad. Just order water. Soft drinks are expensive, though it's an all you can drink deal, but seriously, why the extra calories of sugar water to fill you when there's all the good food that comes with the package plan. I just get water and add lemon slices. Or maybe I'll order hot tea if I'm in the mood, but that's extra too. And I skip the desserts. There are tons of them, none that interesting, but usually at least two varieties of chocolate cake, which will make kids happy. And there are a few other really top-notch dishes, such as the string beans (always just perfectly crispy and not overcooked) or the small clams in the shell which is delicious, or the spinach and cheese dish which they hilariously always misspell as "Spanish Cheese." The rest of the stuff is mostly mediocre, but just sample and find the few really good dishes they serve, and ignore the rest, and you'll love the place. As for bad reviews and complaints about the service, all the waitress does is bring you water and take your used plates. It's a *buffet,* folks! On a rare occasion at peak hours you have to wait a minute or two in line because you pay at the start a one-price fits all, which is an amazing price, btw: $7.00 including tax with the dollar off value-pak monthly coupon in the mail, or $10.00 including tax with the coupon for $1.50 off after 3:30 for dinner or all Sunday. But if you go Sunday afternoon expect a big line to get in -- but that's because half the poor folks in that part of the county take their families there after church! They are doing a huge service to offer all this good food with tons of salad and veggies that poor families can afford instead of a greasy bucket of fried chicken at a fast food restaurant. It's the best cheap after-church family buffet in town. So it gets five stars from me. No, it's not the place to impress your date with, but it is a great place to go alone, or with a big family or group of friends where everyone will find something they like, or to get a great carry out stir fry.
• • •
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
2 reviews
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