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Tom Eigelsbach
Works at Hangouts/Skype Math Tutor and Science/Sci-fi Geek.
Attended Vulcan Academy of Science
Lives in Washington, DC, USA
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Tom Eigelsbach

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This is the biggest piece of the puzzle found in decades, but we're still decades away from a cure for schizophrenia. The key is a gene that has to do with 'synaptic pruning.'

In a baby’s brain, an incredible number of neurons and synaptic connections form — sometimes up to 40,000 per second. By toddlerhood, the brain has amassed more neurons and synapses than it needs, so the excess ones are eliminated; this process begins in early childhood and is completed by early adulthood. 

“Normally, pruning gets rid of excess connections we no longer need, streamlining our brain for optimal performance, but too much pruning can impair mental function,” explained Thomas Lehner, Ph.D. of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), which co-funded the study. “It could help explain schizophrenia’s delayed age-of-onset of symptoms in late adolescence/early adulthood and shrinkage of the brain’s working tissue. Interventions that put the brakes on this pruning process-gone-awry could prove transformative.”

Affecting about 1% of the population, schizophrenia is known to be as much as 90% heritable; yet discovering how specific genes work to confer risk has proven elusive, until now. In patients with schizophrenia, a variation in a single position in the DNA sequence marks too many synapses for removal and that pruning goes out of control. The result is an abnormal loss of gray matter. The genes involved coat the neurons with "eat-me signals," said study co-author Beth Stevens, a neuroscientist at Children's Hospital and Broad. "They are tagging too many synapses. And they're gobbled up."

Steven Hyman, director of the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research at the Broad Institute at MIT, and former director of NIMH, calls it "the most significant mechanistic study about schizophrenia ever. I’m a crusty, old, curmudgeonly skeptic. But I’m almost giddy about these findings."

References:
http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature16549.html
http://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/schizophrenias-strongest-known-genetic-risk-deconstructed
http://nymag.com/scienceofus/2016/01/huge-genetic-breakthrough-on-schizophrenia.html
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2016/01/27/scientists-open-the-black-box-of-schizophrenia-with-dramatic-genetic-finding/

#psychiatry   #psychology   #mentalillness   #schizophrenia  
Scientists have discovered a gene variant involved in synaptic pruning puts individuals at higher risk for developing schizophrenia.
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I read it, but I'm not clear on whether too many or not enough synapses are severed.
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This is a nifty example of what linguists refer to as "conversational implicature," a term coined by H. P. Grice to refer to what is suggested in an utterance, even though neither expressed nor strictly implied (that is, entailed) by the utterance.

Here, Dilbert has a chance not just to offend Amber via conversational implicature, but in addition he realizes that simply by talking to Wally he can convey to her a specific proposition about what he thinks is wrong with her, while retaining full deniability. (You always get plausible deniability with conversational implicature. That's one of its key marketing features.) Absolutely brilliant!
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+Zephyr López Cervilla It isn't.  But Adams , a notorious misogynist, typically casts women in that role.  
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“It symbolizes the battle I'm fighting while going through this. I'm a warrior."
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Cos Play hardcore style.
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This is a fantastic discovery, and so exciting and shocking, that it gave me goose pimples reading it.

The Babylonians used techniques in BCE centuries, which weren't rediscovered until the 1300's and then later were perfected by Newton, that involved using time as a variable to calculate speed or distance: this is something that everyone learns today and is taken for granted as basic math, but it was revolutionary back then. Constructing trapezoids and then finding the area of the trapezoid (which is getting very close to the integral calculus of Newton's), they didn't need to add up calculations daily, but could make a huge short cut: 

Under the Babylonians' earlier, arithmetic-based method, astronomers would measure the distance Jupiter traveled every day — then, by adding together the 'distance per day' for each day from the first through the 60th, they would get the total distance traveled. The newly discovered method instead used a geometric shortcut, and only needed the 'distance per day' for the first day and the 60th, not the ones in between, to get the distance overall.

In the pic, the distance travelled by Jupiter after 60 days, 10º45', is computed as the area of the trapezoid whose top left corner is Jupiter's velocity over the course of the first day, in distance per day, and its top right corner is Jupiter's velocity on the 60th day. In a second calculation, the trapezoid is divided into two smaller ones with equal area to find the time in which Jupiter covers half this distance.

#mathematics   #math   #astronomy  
A set of ancient Babylonian tablets that describe how to track Jupiter across the sky have revealed an astronomical technique 1500 years ahead of its time.
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Hillary was the hottie. Jeb was quite the stud. Carly looks cute and really huggable. Santorum and Sanders look clueless. Cruz had that same fake smile. Christie was class president. And The Donald was already pinning medals all over himself! Bwahahahahahah.
There are 15 people running for president. 15! (Well, officially there are more than 470 people running, but we're just focusing on the main 15 who we've seen on debate stages etc.) The election is still more than half a year away, and already the nation is tearing itself apart trying to decide who our next president should be. As we get to know the candidates and make our voting decisions, we decided that a mighty fine way to know the men and wo...
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Where Your Elements Came From
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The hydrogen in your body, present in every molecule of water, came from the Big Bang. There are no other appreciable sources of hydrogen in the universe. The carbon in your body was made by nuclear fusion in the interior of stars, as was the oxygen. Much of the iron in your body was made during supernovas of stars that occurred long ago and far away. The gold in your jewelry was likely made from neutron stars during collisions that may have been visible as short-duration gamma-ray bursts. Elements like phosphorus and copper are present in our bodies in only small amounts but are essential to the functioning of all known life. The featured periodic table is color coded to indicate humanity's best guess as to the nuclear origin of all known elements. The sites of nuclear creation of some elements, such as copper, are not really well known and are continuing topics of observational and computational research.

from: http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap160125.html
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Have him in circles
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Tom Eigelsbach

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“In the connection between time and space, space is easier to understand because it’s simply there. But time is forever forcing us towards the future,” says Professor Vaccaro, whose research provides a solution to the origin of dynamics, an issue that has long perplexed science.

“If you want to know where the universe came from and where it’s going, you need to know about time. Experiments on subatomic particles over the past 50 years ago show that Nature doesn’t treat both directions of time equally. In particular, subatomic particles called K and B mesons behave slightly differently depending on the direction of time. When this subtle behaviour is included in a model of the universe, what we see is the universe changing from being fixed at one moment in time to continuously evolving. In other words, the subtle behaviour appears to be responsible for making the universe move forwards in time. Understanding how time evolution comes about in this way opens up a whole new view on the fundamental nature of time itself. It may even help us to better understand bizarre ideas such as travelling back in time.”
Griffith University physicist Associate Professor Joan Vaccaro is challenging long-held presumptions about the connection between time and space
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Science is Ordinary Magic!

http://smbc-comics.com/index.php?id=4002
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Hilarious rap song about the 4 new elements recently discovered.
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The 6’3”, 305-pound Baltimore Ravens offensive lineman John Urschel will begin a PhD in mathematics at MIT this year.
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WOW! As if the NFL wasn't enough, he really is a glutton for punishment!
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Hey ‪#‎Firefly‬ fans, look who has the female lead in Deadpool? Yes!!!
Firefly and Homeland star Morena Baccarin has joined the cast of Deadpool as the female lead joining Ryan Reynolds, T.J. Miller, Gina Carano, and Ed Skrein.
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Math Tutor
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  • Hangouts/Skype Math Tutor and Science/Sci-fi Geek.
    Math Tutor, present
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Washington, DC, USA
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Greenbelt, MD
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✔ Certified Skeptic, Gamer, Philosopher, Sci-fi/Science Geek, Math Tutor
Introduction
"It is in the admission of ignorance and the admission of uncertainty that there is a hope for the continuous motion of human beings in some direction that doesn't get confined, permanently blocked, as it has so many times before in various periods in the history of man." 
— Richard P. Feynman
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I love science. I love math.
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TVTom
Tom Eigelsbach's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
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Stephen Colbert Interviews Neil DeGrasse Tyson | PsiVid, Scientific Amer...
blogs.scientificamerican.com

Stephen Colbert is a smart science fan and often features great science book authors and scientists on his show, The Colbert Report. I also

Welcome to Looney Labs!
www.looneylabs.com

Seven Dragons. Featuring the artwork of Larry Elmore! Seven Dragons is a fast domino-like card game, where players attempt to be the first t

Watch: Colbert Interviews deGrasse Tyson - STEM Education (usnews.com)
www.usnews.com

Watch Stephen Colbert, who is out of character, interview Neil deGrasse Tyson about science.

watch it: Stephen Colbert interviews Neil deGrasse Tyson | MaryAnn Johan...
www.flickfilosopher.com

Colbert is out of character, deGrasse Tyson is funny and passionate. It’s long but well worth the time...

Explore Arabia with Amalia! The Arabic Alphabet
arabiangazette.com

Amalia Costin, a self-taught Arabic language expert, explores the ins and outs of the Arabic language and culture in an engaging and informa

Science Saved My Soul
marcalandimartino.wordpress.com

One thing I love about the Internet is that no matter how much cool stuff you come across there's always something that makes you think, "Ho

This is the best Indian restaurant I've ever been to. It's also the best buffet of any cuisine I know of in the DC-Baltimore area, as long as you love Indian cuisine. The serve a buffet 7 days a week at a cost of $11 or $13 on weekends. Their weekend buffets are the best, however. I had three insanely wonderful dishes last time I was at the Curry Leaf for lunch on a Saturday. An okra dish that was out of this world. Same with the eggplant dish. And an outstanding cauliflower dish. Any of those three I'd consider batter than any dish at any Indian restaurant I've ever eaten at, and they had them all. They also had meat dishes, but I don't eat meat. And a dessert that was different from the usual India desserts, but it was delicious. My one problem was I had to pull myself away when I was full, because it was so good I just wanted to eat more. And on top of that, you are allowed to bring your own beer or wine with you and there is no 'corking' fee. So while this is above average what I usually want to pay for lunch, what you save from bringing your own bottle of wine to share makes up for it, as a $10 bottle of wine will usually cost you $30 or more in a restaurant. Hence, I'll bring along some of my favorite craft beer or a good bottle of wine to share, making this both my go-to place for special occasions with friends as well as my current favorite restaurant.
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
This is a great place to eat, given a couple of qualifications. It's got some really wonderful dishes that make it worthwhile. Most of the stuff they serve is mediocre and not very good, but as it's a buffet, if you know what the few really good ones are, that makes no difference, and you'll get a fantastic deal. You can take what you don't eat home, or get an extra plateful to go, or just get food to go for only $4 a pound ($6 for meat/fish). That's a great deal, and I usually get a plateful of stir-fry veggies to take home for another meal. Also, even the mediocre food is a plus if you bring finicky friends or finicky kids: they have plenty of junk food (pizza, french fries, fried chicken nuggets), plus plenty of stuff for vegans and vegetarians, plus lots of normal chinese dishes from lo mein to beef & broccoli, Everybody will like something here. The Hibachi stir fry is fantastic: you pick your own selection of veggies (and/or meats and eggs), and they have a good selection including snow peas and fresh mushrooms, and they'll cook it in front of you, and add whatever sauces you want or lots of garlic if you wish. Worth it if this is all you get. The sushi is good. Mostly California roll kinds of sushi, maybe a dozen varieties, with a couple of them vegan and several with cooked rather than raw fish. More than worth it just for the sushi alone. The salad bar is way above average, better than any of the ones you see in the supermarket for $5 or $6 a pound, with more variety, except this is all you can eat or only $4 a pound to take home, so that's worth it if you only eat salad, or bring along friends on a diet who just want to eat salad. Just order water. Soft drinks are expensive, though it's an all you can drink deal, but seriously, why the extra calories of sugar water to fill you when there's all the good food that comes with the package plan. I just get water and add lemon slices. Or maybe I'll order hot tea if I'm in the mood, but that's extra too. And I skip the desserts. There are tons of them, none that interesting, but usually at least two varieties of chocolate cake, which will make kids happy. And there are a few other really top-notch dishes, such as the string beans (always just perfectly crispy and not overcooked) or the small clams in the shell which is delicious, or the spinach and cheese dish which they hilariously always misspell as "Spanish Cheese." The rest of the stuff is mostly mediocre, but just sample and find the few really good dishes they serve, and ignore the rest, and you'll love the place. As for bad reviews and complaints about the service, all the waitress does is bring you water and take your used plates. It's a *buffet,* folks! On a rare occasion at peak hours you have to wait a minute or two in line because you pay at the start a one-price fits all, which is an amazing price, btw: $7.00 including tax with the dollar off value-pak monthly coupon in the mail, or $10.00 including tax with the coupon for $1.50 off after 3:30 for dinner or all Sunday. But if you go Sunday afternoon expect a big line to get in -- but that's because half the poor folks in that part of the county take their families there after church! They are doing a huge service to offer all this good food with tons of salad and veggies that poor families can afford instead of a greasy bucket of fried chicken at a fast food restaurant. It's the best cheap after-church family buffet in town. So it gets five stars from me. No, it's not the place to impress your date with, but it is a great place to go alone, or with a big family or group of friends where everyone will find something they like, or to get a great carry out stir fry.
• • •
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
3 reviews
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