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Tirthankar Dubey
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Tirthankar Dubey

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He adds: “I think the problem is, people just don’t know their history.”
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Tirthankar Dubey

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The BBC's Justin Rowlatt examines the evolution of one of India's favourite street foods, the samosa.
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Vote for freedom: freedom to travel, freedom to exchange, freedom to love and be loved.

Europe is ours!

‪#‎BRITA‬[IN]
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Boy oh boy! Google makes absolutely amazing adverts!
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Leave is trying to be all things to all people. If they win, that won't end well.

Nick Cohen and Fraser Nelson discuss The Spectator’s decision to back Brexit: We British flatter ourselves that common sense is…
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"Hang on. Cigarette? Didn’t you give up cigarettes, Mr Farage?

“No, I’ve sort of made my mind up about all this,” he said. “I think the doctors have got it wrong about smoking.”

The doctors have got it wrong about smoking. Well, Michael Gove did say that the British people “have had enough of experts”."

"I needed a drink. I staggered down to the bar (well, of course HMS Farage had a bar) and asked for a bottle of beer. “Four pounds 30,” said the barman. Four pounds 30? Goodness. The Brexit elite is totally out of touch with ordinary hard-working drinkers."

" It must surely go down in British naval history. The defeat of the Armada, Trafalgar, Jutland… and the day Bob Geldof chased Nigel Farage down the Thames while shouting about EU fishing quotas.

If the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say: This was their weirdest hour."

What a day !!

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/06/15/nigel-farage-bob-geldof-a-chase-down-the-thames-and-the-most-sur/
One day, years from now, when I’m sitting in my armchair beside the fire, my son will come up to me and ask, “Daddy… what did you do in the EU referendum?
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Tirthankar Dubey

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We have got youth unemployment down to two. Not 2% - just two unemployed young people.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/article/36660186/new-zealand-town-with-too-many-jobs-and-houses-is-looking-for-new-residents
The tiny town of Kaitangata on the South Island of New Zealand has a relatively unique problem - too many affordable houses and job opportunities and not enough people to fill them.
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The Brexit results on Friday morning came as a shock to me. Now that i have had two days to digest the results, here are a few thoughts.

It is no exaggeration to say that i am very disappointed. The consequences of this vote are immense.
Everybody had their own reasons for voting the way they did. But to me, the two major campaign themes ... economy and immigration, seemed rather shallow issues for a referendum of this magnitude. They are important issues, without a doubt. But they are also cyclical themes which move with the economic cycle.
The question here was constitutional, whose effects would resonate for multiple decades. So i hope many judged the issue through that lens.

It's not that i think that the UK cannot flourish economically outside the EU. It can. Will it do better than if it were inside ? That is unknowable.

But something is lost today.

Nationalism isn't bad. But the first half of the 20th century saw the most profound effects of ugly nationalism. EU was set up to guard against that and throughout its existence, it has worked towards developing a supra-national identity for Europeans, with some success. UK's exit is a giant setback to that effort.
All is not lost. The bigger risk is if this event causes the EU to break up.
Even if that were to happen, i do not expect (at least that is not my base case) that Europe will descend into the same military rivalries that characterised the continent prior to 1945. The European powers might have better leaders in future than they had in the past. But we would be putting the fate of the continent into the hands of individuals as opposed to an institution. If the institutional bulwark against narrow national self interest is lost, that would be a grave loss indeed.
I am quite possibly being paranoid. But it was not a risk i believe was worth taking.

Is a post-national world possible ?
Not today. Most people wouldn't support it in this day and age.
But i believe that the ethnic and national divisions we have today is anachronistic. It is a relic from an era when we did not have the transportation and communication technologies that we have today. If we start a new human colony on Mars, will we really have ethnically divided campsites there ?
But we hold on to those feelings and we will for some time.

The founders of the European project dreamt of a post-national world. It is quite possible that their dream will not be fulfilled in their lifetime. In that sense i compare them to the abolitionists or the suffragists of the 1700s. They were few and their aims weren't achieved for several generations. But if they hadn't dreamed, the future movement wouldn't have been possible.

Is the dream utopian ? Possibly. But if even our dreams remain within the bounds of reality, that is a sad life to live in.

Yes, my dreams were hit hard on Saturday. But i will continue to dream.
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To be a bit tongue in cheek, the problem with dreams is that one day you have to wake up and reconcile to the harsh reality of life.

Well written anyhow. Obviously you know I don't agree with it.
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The Dead Sea is one of the great ecological treasures of the world but it is shrinking at an alarming rate, as Kevin Connolly reports.
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It's scary to think how accurate a depiction of middle class Indian life in the late 1980s this is.
Twenty five years on, this seems so distant. 
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"Leave are promising you can keep everything you like but jettison everything you don’t, just as the Scottish Yes campaign promised shortbread and whisky for all and a Unicorn to graze in every garden."

Very very well written ... almost identical with my thoughts.

http://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2016/06/england-gone-mad/
In the final, frenzied, all-things-seem-possible days of the Scottish referendum on independence – the days when it seemed there was…
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