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Timothy Jabez Newman
Aviation enthusiast and blogger at firstinaviation; Also loves classical music!
Aviation enthusiast and blogger at firstinaviation; Also loves classical music!
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Air Berlin pilot's 'lap of honour' is being investigated

The pilot of the flight from Miami on Monday pulled up the aircraft above the runway in Duesseldorf and made a low pass over the airport before coming around and landing

http://nationalpost.com/news/world/air-berlin-pilots-lap-of-honour-is-being-investigated

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Plane spotting at Changi Airport, Singapore. Date: 12/10/17
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10/13/17
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Formation of Bulgarian Mig-21bis fighters
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Why don’t planes fly over Antarctica? Dangerous reason REVEALED

Planes have very strict rules regarding their flight routes, due to both safety and political reasons.
For example, flights going over Tibet are banned due to the mountain ranges in the region.

However frequent fliers may not realise that planes also don’t fly over Antarctica either albeit an entirely different reason.

Whilst charter flights may still be able to fly over it, commercial airlines rarely do.
Leo Moran, an English Language tutor offered the reason behind this via online forum Quora.

He stated: “During the Reagan Administration, the Administrator of the FAA, J. Lynn Helms, decided that no twin-engine aircraft should be permitted to be beyond 60 minutes from an airfield to which they could divert in case of emergency, making them little better than flying versions of boats before the advent of navigation.

In laymen terms, this means an aircraft must be within an hour of an airport to land in in the event of an emergency.

The rule this is called the Extended Range Operation with Two-Engine Airplanes (ETOPS)

While some planes can be three or four-engine planes, it limits which commercial airlines can fly over it.

It’s not the only reason as Moran also explains how it could risk the safety of the passengers due to the harsh terrain.

Moran explains: “Due to the Mount Erebus disaster [when an Air New Zealand flight crashed in Antarctica, killing all 257 people on board], it demonstrated the dangers of that continent’s frequent white-outs and the lethality of the conditions for any crash survivors.

“Also, flying at or near one of the Earth’s magnetic poles is generally a nightmare, because the terms of navigational direction are pretty much meaningless.”

Antarctica also hides another secret, due to its open and vapid terrain

http://www.express.co.uk/travel/articles/859486/planes-fly-antarctica-revealed
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After announcing the early progress of the Lockheed SR-71 successor in June of this year, a subscale demonstrator has been reportedly spotted at skunkworks. This plane will be powered by elements of a turbine and scramjet. The turbine will operate up to Mach 3 while the scramjet will take over beyond that. It is projected to reach hypersonic speeds (Mach 5+).
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