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Tim Wesson
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Just as #Anonymous are closing websites in defence of free expression, and #Cameron is seeking to crack down on private communication in defence of free speech, so the French are cracking down on inflammatory speech in memory of #CharlieHebdo.

It is a characteristic of extremists that they do not understand irony.
Arrest of French comedian Dieudonné over Facebook comments portends bigger crack down on dissent in Europe.
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The much-praised Chilling Effects DMCA archive has taken an unprecedented step by censoring its own website. Facing criticism from copyright holders, the organization decided to wipe its presence from all popular search engines. A telling example of how pressure from rightsholders causes a chilling effect on free speech.
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Does the US really love journalists and free speech?
After supporters protested his “sham” trial, Abdulelah Haider Shaye would have been pardoned. Then Obama intervened.
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Betteridge's Law of Headlines is most apt here
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‘Bill Caming became AT&T's attorney for privacy and fraud matters in September 1965. Greenstar had been in operation for about a year when he was briefed on it. His reaction was immediate: "Change the name. I don't even know what it is, but it just sounds illegal. Change the name." More innocent-sounding code names like "Dewdrop" and "Ducky" were apparently unavailable, so AT&T and Bell Labs opted for something utilitarian and unlikely to attract attention: Greenstar was rechristened "Toll Test Unit."’
28 January 2013. ATT Project Greenstar Secretly Spied Millions of Calls. Greenstar prefigures current ATT's once-secret participation in intercepting vast telecommunications data for the National Security Agency. More: https://www.eff.org/nsa-spying/faq ...
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A proper solution for anonymous mail.
Privacy doesn't need to be hard.Bote allows users to send and receive email...
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On Wieseltier's belief in belief.
The 19 February 2006 issue of the New York Times Book Review carries a tendentious attack on Breaking the Spell: Religion as a Natural Phenomenon, the latest work by American philosopher Daniel Dennett.
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The Digital Einstein Papers, an open access site for The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein.
http://einsteinpapers.press.princeton.edu
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Nincompoop.
Britain’s Prime Minister, David Cameron, is calling for new surveillance powers in the wake of the recent shootings in Paris. Speaking at a public event in the UK this morning, Cameron outlined the...
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This echos the former US laws on encryption, which prohibited the export of encryption technology, as ITAR classified it as a "munition". This led to stupidities like being legally allowed to walk around or leave the country in a T-shirt with a line of encryption code written on it, but placing the same line of code in a file and making the file available publicly was considered to be a weapons charge.

The US eventually moved responsibility for encryption to the State Department, and created a two-tiered system, with it being legal to export "weak" encryption (except to specifically designated "terrorist" countries), but not "strong" encryption. The breakpoint was 56-bit-key equivalent, 64 bit encryption. It was widely understood at the time that the NSA had the resources to decrypt 64 bit encryption "quickly enough"; one must assume that decryption has gotten even faster since then.

It is widely understood that no modern country can get away with banning encryption of business transactions. It is also well understood that each person has a substantial interest in the security and confidentiality of medical records and the exchange thereof -- but wealth is more likely to flee the country in the first case than people are likely to go on a general strike to protect their medical records.

DVDs and Bluetooth are encrypted, and Hollywood would have strong objections to being forced to release without encryption or DRM (Digital Rights Management). Apple and kin would probably threaten to withdraw itunes from the UK market.

But you can predict that somehow the law would be written to protect "business communications". And trust the bad guys to respect that crime is not a "business communication".

Do I detect a forthcoming proposal of requirement to register one's encryption keys with the government instead of outright ban on encryption?
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False flag/black op?

Taking down websites is not a blow for freedom of expression, and Anonymous are smart enough to know it.
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Fair enough. 
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A proper solution for anonymous email.

Also available on F-droid [https://f-droid.org/], just add the repository [https://f-droid.i2p.io/repo].
Privacy doesn't need to be hard.Bote allows users to send and receive email...
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Public bookmark.
Call for evidence on fundamental rights for the government’s review of the balance of competences between the UK and the European Union.
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Some bedtime reading...
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