Profile

Cover photo
Verified name
Tim O'Reilly
Works at O'Reilly Media
Attended Harvard
Lives in Oakland, CA
3,905,494 followers|34,580,017 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube+1's
People
Have him in circles
3,905,494 people
Benjamiz Benjamin's profile photo
Akram Khan's profile photo
aliou sy's profile photo
Mireyi Rosado's profile photo
Luka Mihailovic's profile photo
Yandar Mkhizer's profile photo
tahir koser's profile photo
Jessica Pierre's profile photo
Carlos Idiabe's profile photo
Work
Occupation
CEO
Employment
  • O'Reilly Media
    CEO, present
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Oakland, CA
Previously
Sebastopol, CA - San Francisco, CA - Killarney, Ireland - San Francisco, CA - McLean, VA - Cambridge, MA - Watertown, MA - Newton, MA
Story
Tagline
Founder and CEO of O'Reilly Media
Introduction
Founder and CEO, O'Reilly Media. Computer book publisher, conference producer, internet activist.  Involved in open source, open standards, web 2.0, and open government. Current interests: "gov 2.0", sensors and collective intelligence applications based on them, DIY, shaping how people think about emerging technologies. I also spend a lot of time encouraging people to work on stuff that matters.
Bragging rights
O'Reilly Media is still going strong after 30+ years; have shaped the dialogue around open source, web 2.0, the maker movement, open government, and the internet of things.
Education
  • Harvard
  • Bishop O'Connell High School
  • St. Ignatius High School
  • St. Cecilia's School
Basic Information
Gender
Male

Stream

Tim O'Reilly

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
I'll be moderating a great panel at  #sparksummit East in two weeks. Hope to see you there  http://goo.gl/L75OKP  
View original post
14
1
Shahidul Islam's profile photofifi dadzie's profile photoGábor Jakab's profile photo
2 comments
 
nice
Add a comment...
 
What a great read!  @neilhimself explains why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming. I love the bit about China! And I am horrified by the bit about prisons.
A lecture explaining why using our imaginations, and providing for others to use theirs, is an obligation for all citizens
119
64
Terrence Lee Reed's profile photocarys pugh's profile photoMichelle Winther's profile photoRebecca Karlis's profile photo
3 comments
 
Tubercular hobo day care centers.
Add a comment...

Tim O'Reilly

Shared publicly  - 
 
Help O'Reilly Media learn more about software architecture roles by completing a short industry survey. You could win a free pass to the new O'Reilly Software Architecture Conference in Boston next month. #OReillySACon
19
3
Aliou Minthe's profile photoMichael Schmidt's profile photothais yolanda Velasco's profile photoStephen Figgins's profile photo
2 comments
 
Xxl
Add a comment...

Tim O'Reilly

Shared publicly  - 
 
I'm going to be interviewing Marc Goodman, author of the amazing book Future Crimes via hangout this afternoon - 4pm Eastern, 1 pm Pacific. Marc takes us into the underworld of the future (happening now), where criminals are early adopters ("Moore's Law and Moore's Outlaws" is the provocative chapter of one title.)  We'll explore the risks and the resilience of the next stage of technology.
 
Tweet your questions for the chat with the hashtag #FutureCrimesConvo, and start reading Future Crimes now: www.futurecrimes.com

In FUTURE CRIMES, one of the world’s leading authorities on global security, Marc Goodman, takes readers deep into the digital underground to expose the alarming ways criminals, corporations, and even countries are using new and emerging technologies against you—and how this makes everyone more vulnerable than ever imagined. 

Marc Goodman will be in conversation with Tim O'Reilly, CEO of O'Reilly Media. Since 1978, Tim O'Reilly has been a chronicler and catalyst of leading-edge development, honing in on the technology trends that really matter and galvanizing their adoption by amplifying "faint signals" from the alpha geeks who are creating the future. His company is publisher of the iconic "animal books" for software developers, creator of the first commercial website (GNN), organizer of the summit meeting that gave the open source software movement its name, and he was a key figure in the "Web 2.0" renaissance after the dot com bust, focusing the industry on the role of data rather than software in driving competitive advantage in the next generation of applications.
This Hangout On Air is hosted by Penguin Random House. The live video broadcast will begin soon.
Q&A
Preview
Live
Author Marc Goodman in Conversation with Tim O'Reilly
Thu, February 26, 4:00 PM
Hangouts On Air - Broadcast for free

21 comments on original post
15
1
O'Reilly's profile photo
Add a comment...

Tim O'Reilly

Shared publicly  - 
 
Really great career advice here: "Getting off the “I should learn Python… someday” train and focusing on topics that interest me (rather than an arbitrary skill I thought I should learn) was extremely liberating."
30
8
kurt lippisch's profile photoMuzamil Satar's profile photoDiogo Cavaco's profile photoPablo Carbonell-Klempt's profile photo
 
Back in the early 2001 I actually picked up a copy of "Programming Perl", which is probably the most controversial technical volume ever written. Just felt like leaning a new language. No, I didn't become a Perl guru, but going through the learning helped my professional growth in many ways. So, thank you Tim, Larry and other good technical folks. Keep producing quality books. We will read them.
Add a comment...

Tim O'Reilly

Shared publicly  - 
 
Santa Fe sunset
160
6
Brenda Strepp's profile photoDebbie Mosser's profile photoCURE GLIOBLASTOMA BRAIN CANCER's profile photoAleksandar Aleksandrov's profile photo
5 comments
 
Sunsets at the porch of the SF Opera, best place I have ever been for them.
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
3,905,494 people
Benjamiz Benjamin's profile photo
Akram Khan's profile photo
aliou sy's profile photo
Mireyi Rosado's profile photo
Luka Mihailovic's profile photo
Yandar Mkhizer's profile photo
tahir koser's profile photo
Jessica Pierre's profile photo
Carlos Idiabe's profile photo

Tim O'Reilly

Shared publicly  - 
 
There are two kinds of interviews: those that quote you literally, and those that distill the essence of what you said, perfectly. Chris O'Brien's @venturebeat interview with me did the latter, and nailed it.  Just about the only time I can think of a flawless transcript of what was meant rather than just what was said.
Smart forks. Smart tennis rackets. Smart toothbrushes. Smart teddy bears. Smart fitness bands. The Internet of Things hype is inspiring an endless stream of connected gadgets that light up Kickstar...
59
16
Ottone Maurizio Grasso's profile photoJonathan Stewart's profile photoFabrice Di Meglio's profile photoTim Tautges's profile photo
5 comments
 
When has Silicon Valley ever cared much about the industrial applications of technology? Maybe they should finally start caring.
Add a comment...

Tim O'Reilly

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
via @joe_hellerstein: Call for Proposals for @TheOfficialACM Symposium on Cloud Computing http://goo.gl/vAlWZM  #acmsocc #socc2015 
View original post
6
1
Jorge Garcia's profile photo
Add a comment...

Tim O'Reilly

Shared publicly  - 
 
Just about to go on with Marc Goodman (@futurecrimes) for a discussion of his book Future Crimes starting in about 7 minutes, here: https://plus.google.com/events/c7lf0pdvsn6nb0qj3cibnu6othc  Join us!  It should be a fascinating conversation.
7
Roman CAT's profile photo
 
Tim ... Great Hangout, Everyone should watch.
The Truth in CyberCrime is stranger than Fiction
Everything is #insecure !!  Ignore at your Peril
Hard Work ahead before anything is really 
@ProvenSecure
Add a comment...
 
I'm going to be doing a google hangout this Thursday, February 26 at 1 pm Pacific, with Marc Goodman, author of the new book Future Crimes, talking about the remarkable underworld of the internet.

Tweet your questions for the chat with the hashtag #FutureCrimesConvo, and start reading Future Crimes now: www.futurecrimes.com
25
4
Carlos Zorrilla's profile photoLee Rickler's profile photoDarlene Wallach's profile photoXavier Badosa's profile photo
 
Looking forward to it Tim!
Add a comment...
 
Neville Chamberlin, Winston Churchill, and climate change. A good reminder to politicians about the importance of thinking about things that are hard to imagine.
A two-part essay about the human heart, the human mind, and how they relate to the climate crisis.
42
7
Vik Arya's profile photoWilliam Rutiser's profile photogeorge oloo's profile photoMaurice Perry's profile photo
3 comments
 
Cool
Add a comment...

Tim O'Reilly

Shared publicly  - 
 
Absolutely fascinating exploration of the microbiome of a city.

For those who don't know what the microbiome is, the article defines it with some interesting statistics:

"Typically, every person is home to about a hundred trillion microbial cells bearing five million different genes, totaling about 5 pounds of micro-organisms per person. Indeed, microbes in and on the body outnumber human cells about 10 to one.

“You are a minority party in the democracy of the body,” Dr. Mason said.

"The body’s collection of microbes, called the microbiome, influences health in ways that researchers are only beginning to understand. They may be key to proper digestion, vitamin synthesis and brain function, new research suggests. Changes among the millions of microbes living in the human stomach also may promote obesity, trigger ulcers or affect how well a flu vaccine works."

The article describes a research project to explore signs of this microbiome expressed on surfaces throughout the NYC subways.

My two favorite quotes:

“A city is like an organism,” said IBM Corp. computational biologist Robert Prill, who is among those at the company investigating ways to better collect and analyze these immense new public-health genome databases. “It has a circulating system consisting of the movement of people.”

and

“We know next to nothing about the ecology of urban environments,” said evolutionary biologist Jonathan Eisen at the University of California at Davis. “How will we know if there is something abnormal if we don’t know what normal is?”
Scientists in 18-Month Project Gather DNA Throughout Transit System to Identify Germs, Study Urban Microbiology
176
55
Laila Lalita's profile photoAjmal Ali's profile photoEdwin Newkirk's profile photolamin badjie's profile photo
20 comments
 
Congratulations.
Add a comment...
Tim O'Reilly's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Why I Left United Airlines - The New Yorker
www.newyorker.com

The United merger is a grand example of a consumer sinkhole—a merger that proves to be an ongoing disaster for consumers, who suffer for yea

The Three Breakthroughs That Have Finally Unleashed AI on the World | WIRED
www.wired.com

The AI on the horizon looks more like Amazon Web Services—cheap, reliable, industrial-grade digital smartness running behind everything, and

Quip: Documents + Messaging
market.android.com

* Featured in TIME Magazine's Top 10 Apps of 2013; MIT Technology Review's 10 Breakthrough Technologies 2014 *Quip is a modern productivity

Doyen of American critics turns his back on the 'nasty, stupid' world of...
www.theguardian.com

Dave Hickey condemns world he says has become calcified by too much money, celebrity and self-reverence

Discouraged Developer
www.tbray.org

I’m a soft­ware guy; I like writ­ing code. Over the last decade, my niche has been a mod­est amount of cod­ing and a lot of writ­ing about i

HomeAway
plus.google.com

HomeAway operates the world's largest online vacation rental marketplace

Swarm
market.android.com

Swarm, the new app from Foursquare, is the fastest way to keep up and meet up with your friends. With Swarm, you can easily see who’s out ne

Debugging for beginners: a response - Programming - O'Reilly Media
blogs.oreilly.com

This is a follow up to Brian MacDonald’s post on Debugging for Beginners. I read Brian’s post avidly, as I am always keen to take a look at

Daylight Saving Time Is Terrible: Here's a Simple Plan to Fix It
www.theatlantic.com

Losing another hour of evening daylight isn't just annoying. It's an economically harmful policy with minimal energy savings.

Mining the social web, again - O'Reilly Radar
radar.oreilly.com

When we first published Mining the Social Web, I thought it was one of the most important books I worked on that year. Now that we're publis

Announcing BioCoder - O'Reilly Radar
radar.oreilly.com

We're pleased to announce BioCoder, a newsletter on the rapidly expanding field of biology. We're focusing on DIY bio and synthetic biology,

When a Crop Becomes King
michaelpollan.com

Here in southern New England the corn is already waist high and growing so avidly you can almost hear the creak of stalk and leaf as the pla

Why Netflix is one of the most important cloud computing companies
www.networkworld.com

Video rental and streaming company laying groundwork for how cloud may be used in future

Obama Promises Disappear from Web
sunlightfoundation.com

Change.gov, the website created by the Obama transition team in 2008, has effectively disappeared sometime over the last month. While front

Hsieh, O’Reilly, Case: 3 Visionaries Reshaping the World [VIDEO]
tech.co

On the surface, Tony Hsieh, Tim O’Reilly, and Steve Case are far apart – quite literally. One is revitalizing the once-bare neighborhood of

Mote learning
www.economist.com

TAKE a vast windowless hall. Squeeze in hundreds of garish booths vying to produce the loudest and most obnoxious music possible. Then add t

Farmers, Elephants, and Bees: A Winning Combination - Animals
animals.oreilly.com

How an observant researcher figured out that making fences with beehives would deter elephants from destroying crops. And the farmers harves

Drones: When the Future Sneaks Up on You
www.linkedin.com

Last month, at a Congressional hearing, Sentator Patrick Leahy quoted an FAA prediction that there would be "as many 30,000 small, lightweig

O'Reilly
plus.google.com

O'Reilly Media spreads the knowledge of innovators.

Information Diet | How to Prep for a Presentation
www.informationdiet.com

I knew that authors generally make more money from speaking than they do from royalties, so I wanted my talks on the Information Diet to be