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Tim Ehat
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Verizon's reasoning is always fun (slightly reworded):

Our customers want to download more data (TV shows and movies) than they upload to some websites.

Because of this fact, we feel it's the responsibility of the website providers (or their delivery partners) to pay us to upgrade our network so our customers can receive the data they requested. (Or choose another delivery partner who has already paid to upgrade our network.)

We absolutely do not take this stance because we provide a competing service (cable TV shows, movie channels, and PPV) to our customers for an additional fee.

Customers pay us for a fast connection to the limited Verizon IP Network. If customers want their 75mbps service package to perform at those speeds when communicating with the actual Internet outside Verizon's network, they should ask their favorite websites to make sure they use the delivery partners that pay to keep our connection to the greater Internet fast.

+Verizon FiOS +Netflix +Cogent Communications 

#Peering    #NetworkNeutrality   #NetNeutrality   #VerizonPeeringCongestion  

If Verizon's customers realized that this is essentially what Verizon has just said in their blog post (and in other statements), I doubt they'd be pleased.
A few weeks ago, Verizon received an email from a customer in Los Angeles asking why he was not getting a good experience watching Netflix on his 75 Mbps FiOS connection. He was understandably confused by some of the misleading public accounts that inaccurately suggest widespread congestion that ...
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Wow.

The percentages of people who agreed with each conspiracy statement:

37 percent: "The Federal Drug Administration is deliberately preventing the public from getting natural cures for cancer and other diseases because of pressure from drug companies."20 percent: "Health officials know that cell phones cause cancer but are doing nothing about it because large corporations won't let them."12 percent: "The CIA deliberately infected large numbers of African-Americans with HIV under the guise of a hepatitis inoculation program."12 percent: "The global dissemination of genetically modified foods by Monsanto Inc. is part of a secret program, called Agenda 21, launched by the Rockefeller and Ford foundations to shrink the world's population."20 percent: "Doctors and the government still want to vaccinate children even though they know these vaccinations cause autism and other psychological disorders."12 percent: "Public water fluoridation is really just a secret way for chemical companies to dump the dangerous byproducts of phosphate mines into the environment."
Nearly half of adults in America believed at least one medical conspiracy theory, which ranged from vaccinations causing autism to the CIA infecting African-Americans with HIV.
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Heath Eldeen's profile photoTim Ehat's profile photoCorbin Hoenes's profile photo
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Yea they are using po.st which shamelessly stole our copy paste jerk technology.  Tynt FTW!
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Google is smart to keep pushing into the ISP space. First off, it's a space ripe for some disruption here in the US. Additionally, it's a great way overall for them to protect the internet (even if they don't expand into every area) because they can be a consistent threat against the likes of Verizon and Comcast and their anti-network-neutrality ways. Netflix is already slowing down on those two networks (though perhaps not directly from the overturning of the FCC's rules)...

At the very least some lucky people will have an opportunity to get better speeds and, if Google were to join in on the preferred services network ways, have a set of services from someone who rocks at web services. A Verizon or Comcast search engine, chat and email service, cloud storage service, etc.? No thanks.

I'd love for Google to expand Google Fiber to the point where they could (if they wanted) tell Comcast and Verizon they have to pay Google some carriage fees for their customers to have access to some or all of Google's services. Not that Google would want to lose their real revenue stream...
Google has only made plans to roll out gigabit internet access in three US cities so far, but it's not content with stopping there. The company is now
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Saw this little gem a couple months ago. I should have view-source'd to see if there was an ASCII cat or something.
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Though I'm sure Apple will stop selling them in their Apple Stores.
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Nice. 
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It would be cool if apps could tweak the background and foreground colors of the on-screen navigation buttons like they can the bar at the top of the screen. #AndroidL #MaterialDesign
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Also +Roman Nurik posted this gist that may be relevant to your interests: https://gist.github.com/romannurik/8919163
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Tim Ehat

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I complained on my blog several years ago that Verizon's blocking of Google Wallet on the Galaxy Nexus seemed arbitrary and anticompetitive. Now we are all getting better acquainted with the terrorist group that shares a name with Verizon's own mobile payment system. Serves 'em right. #ISIS

http://www.timehat.com/verizons-motives/
So it seems like the Samsung Galaxy Nexus will never launch on Verizon. There must be some sort of gigantic issue holding it up for so long. There are rumors now, though, that Verizon is in a disagreement with Google over removing the Google Wallet app from the phone. Verizon cites technical and ...
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I'm a bitter man...
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Are sync'd tabs really hidden all the way on the history page now in Chrome 33?
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From the article: "'Congress expressly used language throughout the definition section of the 1976 Copyright Act that would encompass all known or yet to be developed technologies,' Kimball wrote in today's order."

The problem I have with this is that I don't think Congress often understands the technical details and differences. To say members of congress specifically chose to make a particular distinction is silly when we have members of congress who pass legislation without reading it. It's too often a "we've gotta pass it to find out what's in it" sort of thing.

Did the Supreme Court ask anyone who voted for the Affordable Care Act if they thought the individual mandate was a tax when they voted for it, or did the court just decide on it's own interpretation instead of finding out what the actual intent was? (Though it certainly makes sense that you have to go based off of the law as written rather than feelings after the fact.)

What probably happens is the bill is written by assistants, lobbies, etc. The representative is probably just responsible for wining and dining and voting.

It's hard to really blame them, though, in a sense. They don't have time to read and thoroughly understand everything. The voters at large can sort them out if they don't pay attention to the important stuff.

In reality, though, it's probably just another bit of evidence that we have far too many laws.
Judges in New York and Utah disagree, as case heads to Supreme Court.
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Tim Ehat's profile photoPeter Ehat's profile photo
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That's a good point.  He's got a lot of campaigning to do between elections, who can expect him to make all those decisions?

Yeah, let's go with Czars.  I'd be cool with that.
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Yikes! Watch out for this one. For such an otherwise very secure and conscientious browser, this is a pretty big hole. I always knee the "access all data on all websites" was giving a lot of trust to someone you probably don't know.
Once in control, they can silently push new ad-filled "updates" to those users.
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lol
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Finally found what you were loling about. Had to view the full image. I'll bet you felt like Will Smith in Independence Day.
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Nicest theater in Utah Valley (perhaps until the Megaplex in Geneva opens). Some screens are larger/newer than others. Buy tickets on official megaplex website if you want to compare different options. The "Mammoth Screen" is next door at the museum of ancient life. It's big, but is a different aspect ratio, so your Hollywood movie will only fill about half of it. Seems to use the same/similar projector as the other screens in the actual theater. Larger screen and same projector = a bit pixelated and not as bright. Show I saw was projected a bit high and I felt a bit like I had a front row seat. I wouldn't pay the extra money to see another film in there. I think one of the theaters off the west-most hallway is the largest and best overall.
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
As far as Walmarts go, this one's not bad. Also has world's nicest Walmart bathroom.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Great and quick service. We had some water leaking out of the A/C evaporator hooked onto the furnace blower down in our basement. A technician named Dave Barlow was sent over and knew exactly what to look for and how to get it quickly fixed up for us so we could start cooling off once again. He took the time to explain what had happened (the extra humid air these last few weeks had caused extra water to condense inside that evaporator which took with it some dust and insulation that had made it in there somehow, clogging the drain pipe), answer questions, and gave an overview of how the whole thing worked. Awesome service and now we're cooling down once again.
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Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
4 reviews
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Brought my wife in to have her wedding ring cut off (she's pregnant and swollen). No charge and happy to help! Nice store, too. I'm sure we'll be back in a couple months to get it sized and repaired.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago