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Thomas Themel
Works at Google
Attended Vienna University of Technology
Lived in Vienna
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You guys provide DNS for a lot of spammy web sites, care to do something about that? Grepping your zonefiles for "buy" or "price" should turn up plenty of examples.
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Evert Guzman's profile photoGrom Moss's profile photoThomas Themel's profile photoRichard Harper's profile photo
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As stated by +Grom Moss​ we will either investigate or if shown sufficient evidence sinkhole any abusive domains.

If you can provide an algorithm to detect non-abusive/abusive usage accurately, we will be happy to review it.
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Beer nerds: Erzbierschof Zürich will run the Erzbierschof Microbrewery Armageddon on July 31st. All taps will be handed over to Swiss microbrewers, two taps per brewery, see below for the tap list. I'd go if I wasn't stuck on the wrong side of the Atlantic.
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Zindlenspitz (2096m), Rossalpelispitz (2075m),  Brünnelistock (2133m) - quality time high above Wägital. I took the S2 to Siebnen/Wangen and biked up to the starting point of the trail a bit behind restaurant Oberhof. The first two hours or so of the 3.5 hour ascent to Zindlenspitz were bog standard alpine hiking, passing through a couple of cow herds and a bunch of more leisurely hiker groups. Some enterprising soul surprised me by creating a self-service cold drink dispenser by floating a lot of cans in one of the many fountains and adding a "pay what you want" box at one of the otherwise not very inhabited looking huts on the Zindlen alp. Yay Switzerland!

On the approach to the ridge, the rewards slowly started revealing themselves - first the Glärnisch peaks and the interesting karst landscape towards Mutteristock, and as one reaches the ridge the view becomes almost too inspiring, including Mürtschenstock and bits of the mountains around Walensee. The short ascent from there to the peak of Zindlenspitz is a little steep, but the spectacular view then also extends in the other directions to include a view back towards the lake, the flatlands and the chain from Fluebrig to Hoch Ybrig. After some admiration time, a refreshing nap in the blooming alpine meadows was in order.

After half an hour, I made my way back down to the path and followed the marked path along the ridge towards Rossalpelispitz. This was mostly unexciting except for one steep drop that comes secured with very new and trustworthy-looking chains. A short scramble from the path to the peak later I got to look ahead at my final goal and feel nervous - the ridge toward Brünnelistock looked small and the sides steep.

As usual, it turned out that things were not nearly as scary up close and the (currently unmarked, but with leftovers of red-and-white markings from the days when hikers were real hikers) path to the peak was actually an enjoyable scramble that is never seriously exposed. 

The view from there was even better than before, particularly back towards Lake Zurich and I decided to take another nap at the peak after enjoying my well-deserved peanuts, disturbed only by the wooshing sounds of swifts making their rounds very closely overhead, before embarking on the somewhat painful 2.5 h descent back down to my bike and an exhilarating half hour ride back down into Siebnen.

I would totally recommend the middle part of this adventure to anyone who enjoys slightly exciting hikes free of objective danger, but the fact that you have 2.5 hours of tedium on either end probably means that similar amounts of fun can be had more cheaply elsewhere (e.g. at Hoch Ybrig, where you can descend by cable car or zipline if you prefer comfort to mountaineering purity).
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A quick impression on Beijing air quality: Pic 1 is an "unhealty" day, pic 2 is a "good" day (wow, they have hills!). I am of course unable to disentangle pollution from "ordinary" fog and haze in this, but running seven kilometers in "unhealthy for sensitive people" this morning was definitely out of my respiratory comfort zone (sorry, no pictures of coughed up slime balls this time), so I suspect that the visibility is a pretty good proxy for PM2.5 concentration.
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I liked these short chats because they highlight how following all the rules that the elder sages laid out in the nineties will not actually lead to better code. In particular, a lot of enterprise code I've seen in my career could benefit from a reexamination under these principles. 
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I really liked the landscapes in Ex Machina. My guess upon seeing them was Patagonia, but it turns out they are reasonably close by, and the billionaire's mansion is actually a hotel - how convenient!
If you were a billionaire genius creating a robot with artificial intelligence, a startlingly modern hideaway in the middle of a remote wilderness wouldn't be a bad place to carry out your project.
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Just watched the Movie yesterday. Ended liking it
Unfortunately, at 160Euro/Night, the Hotel is slightly out of my price range :)
Don't know about you, filthy rich Swiss people :D
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Chrome just got prettier: Art in your new tab page!
Art Project masterpieces from Google Cultural Institute in your browser tabs
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Thomas Themel

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La Tresenta (3609m) and Gran Paradiso (4061m).  I spent the last extended weekend in Italy enjoying some nice high mountain air with a Bergpunkt group. The schedule was very relaxed - we drove to the end of Valsavarenche at Pont on Thursday and made our way up to Rifugio Vittorio Emanuele II. The refuge is large (120 beds) and rather comfortable. - there's even a sit-down toilet (besides two of the more Italy-typical squat setups). Like proper Italians, they have an espresso machine!

On Friday, we got up for a 05:00 breakfast and then got started towards La Tresenta. This began with a climb up the moraine over the hut. We then expected a bit of a glacier crossing, but the situation depicted in the map had apparently neglected a decade or two of climate change, so most of that was instead just a hike over barren rocks and the occasional stream crossing. We finally walked up the puny remains of the glacier and had a short climbing passage to get up on the shoulder of La Tresenta. From there, it was a more or less pleasant walk through various types of rubble to the peak, where we got a good look at busy route to neighbouring Gran Paradiso. Theoretically, we should also have had a view as far as Torino, but that direction remained shrouded in clouds for the entire time we spent at the peak. We returned along the same route, had dinner and got ready for a short night.

We had signed up for the 03:00 breakfast to get an early start towards Gran Paradiso, but when the alarms went off it became clear that it was raining pretty heavily, so we went for another hour of sleep. The rain all but stopped, and so we departed around 05:00 in a rather subdued mood - it was dark, drizzling, and the rain was certain to make the snow on the glacier ascent unpleasantly mushy.

The first one or two hours we trudged along in silence, occasionally cursing the wet slippery rocks or the bad snow on the lower parts of the glacier, but after the first step of the glacier the clouds started to part, the sun broke through and everyone's spirits rose. Higher up, it also turned out that it had been cold enough to avoid rainfall, and so the conditions got better and better as we made our way to the top.

We crossed the bergschrund on the fixed aluminum ladder and reached the little saddle under the final climb up to the peak. That final climb brought us face to face with the awesome popularity of Gran Paradiso - it is not difficult, but since there are so many people and a lot of them are out of their element, it took us the better part of an hour to get to the peak. Most of that time was spent navigating crazy traffic jam situations with teams trying to go up/go down/overtake someone at the same time and then attempting to resolve the resulting congestion in various combinations of Italian, French and English.h

Once we made it to the peak, I think we spent less than a minute there until our guide thankfully decided to use alternative way back that involved abseiling onto a lower plateau and then walking back rather pleasantly instead of squeezing past dozens of people on exposed ledges. By that time, I was somehow shaking all over - I hope I can blame that on the cold from standing still for extended periods in the biting wind instead of nerves from the last few climbing moves on exposed terrain to reach the peak, but who knows.

For the descent, we took a right turn and descended on the Ghiacciaio di Laveciau, which was quite a sight because it flows over a series of steps and consequently has impressive crevasses. The original plan was to cross it all the way towards Rifugio Chabod, but we abandoned that and decided to go back to Rifugio Vittorio Emanuele II because the lower parts of the glacier seemed too tedious to cross and the afternoon snow was getting seriously mushy. To that end, we got back on the ridge separating the two glaciers, crossed some rubble and then had to climb down on the other side to get back down on the moraine that took us back to the refuge.

We arrived at around 16:30, had a victory beer and a short nap before dinner, a bottle of celebratory red wine and a good night's sleep. The next day, we walked back down to the car and drove back to Bern.

All in all, it was a very enjoyable experience, and I'm even glad to have experienced the craziness at the peak. Having a guide in that situation was pretty helpful because in retrospect I wouldn't have trusted myself not to mess anything up in the stress and hurry to make the last meters.
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Impressive!
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Because I recently had a discussion of potentially maybe someday going on a cruise (I walked past the "Allure of the Seas" in port and noticed that it has a sweet-looking climbing wall), I revisited David Foster Wallace's classic treatment of the cruise ship experience, which originally ran in Harper's Magazine as Shipping Out, but I think the title it received when it was republished as part of an essay collection, A Supposedly Fun Thing I Will Never Do Again captures the spirit of the work much better.
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No, that is A Supposedly Fun Thing I Will Stay Far Away From Because I Know Better. 
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Explore the Grand Palais in Paris with StreetView and the Google Cultural Institute!
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The Italian beer harvest from a visit to Il Pretesto in Bologna. The Mikkeller one snuck in. 
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Wikipedia seems to be in begging mode again, and much of their donation rhetoric is around "we need money to keep Wikipedia running". I was interested in seeing how much of the Wikimedia foundation's money would actually go towards this since I had heard about lots of extra activities that they're into, so I took a look at the 2014/15 financial plan for the Wikimedia foundation. 

The top-level Engineering + Product orgs make up about half of the spending (42%, 25M USD). A top-level item named "HR, Finance & Admin" is set to consume 18% of planned expenditure (10.8M USD), which is more than all of "Operations" (13%, 7.7M USD) - it's a little mystifying to my why that has to be so high. Another 20% (11.5M USD )  is taken up by grant making activity, which they're alternately enthusiastic ("a set of highly transparent and participatory processes") and lukewarm ("early evidence suggests that the Wikimedia movement's programmatic activities aren't achieving the level of impact we'd hope to see with the money that's being spent") about. 

I still gave them a bunch of my (and Google's) money, but I'd feel better about it if they engaged in less disingenuous messaging or allowed me to contribute to the narrow uncontroversial purpose that they advertise for instead of their somewhat nebulous overall mission.
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Hugo van der Merwe's profile photoThomas Themel's profile photoDavid Richfield's profile photo
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Unfortunately that's way more detail than I know, so let's see whether the others that I've tagged in this discussion are able to comment.
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Have him in circles
176 people
Anna Maria Nowakowska's profile photo
Pascal Andrey (Magrobar)'s profile photo
Alexey Shaban's profile photo
Raphael Ackermann's profile photo
Christa Themel's profile photo
Martin Rauter's profile photo
Christophe Blondeau's profile photo
René Kyllingstad's profile photo
Michael Prokop's profile photo
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Computer Nerd
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  • Google
    Software Engineer, 2013 - present
  • Mirai Solutions GmbH
    Solutions Architect, 2011 - 2013
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  • Vienna University of Technology
    Physics, 2005 - 2010
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The newly opened Zurich branch of Switzerland's finest craft beer establishment offers 24 beers on tap (see website for current menu), two ale pumps and a few fridges of bottles for those with even more need for variety. Service can be a little slow and good beer is often expensive, though the free samples and reduced takeaway prices help blunt the impact a little.
Public - 4 months ago
reviewed 4 months ago
Truly the most excellent of B&Bs. Beautiful house, incredibly nice owners, great surroundings.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Never tried before the change in management, but a couple of times since. Food is good, but not exceptional - classic Italian base with some off-beat extra ingredients and liberal use of truffle oil. Prices are on the expensive end of reasonable (20-30 CHF for pasta/risotto).
Food: Very GoodDecor: Very GoodService: Excellent
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
5 reviews
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Incredible selection of beers served by competent staff. Could use a cozier interior and cheaper prices, but the great beer makes it a solid five star pick.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago