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Thomas Green
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Thomas Green

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Revisiting this today. The guy who made this is a mad genius, literally.

"TempleOS is an x86_64, multi-tasking, multi-cored, public domain, open source, ring-0-only, single-address-map (identity-mapped), non-networked, PC operating system for recreational programming."

...and my favorite line...

"I capped the line-of-code count at 100,000, so it will never be ugly. Currently, it is 81,047 lines of code.  God's temple must be perfect, so backward compatibility is not promised."

If you are interested, check out his youtube channel too - 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdX4uJUwSFwiY3XBvu-F_-Q

It runs in a VM superbly. I have this man to thank for my interest in low-level coding.
The Temple Operating System. Why did they make Solomon's Temple? It was a direction to look, to focus on, a special place for meditation, to do offerings, a community center, a home to God's beauty, that encouraged love of God. People cherished God's temple, beautifying it with gold and all fine ...
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Zachtronics has released another genius game. I always hate sounding like I am advertising for someone else's product, but for those of you who ever wondered what it's like to program in Assembly, this is the puzzle game for you.

Billed as, "The assembly language programming game you never asked for", TIS-100 gives you a Turing complete instruction set and then presents you with puzzles to to solve with it. 

I know what you're saying. "But Thom, given enough lines of code for any Turing complete language, I can do anything..." Well there's the catch. The catch is you have to do it in a series of 'nodes' that pass data back and forth. And you have only 1 register, and a backup register per node.

Each node only allows for so many lines of code before you have to offload the work onto the next node in the chain. You'll be given problems like, "Take input from input.a, a zero delimited string of numbers, and output only the largest, and smallest number."

Here's an example of a function I wrote that returns the absolute difference of two values.

#ABS(x-y) =
S:MOV ANY ACC
SUB LAST
JLZ N
MOV ACC LAST
JMP S
N: NEG
MOV ACC LAST

Short explanation by line #.

1. Anything beginning with a # is a comment.
2. Move any port input to the Accumulator(register). 'S:' is a label for jumping and for me it stands for Start.
3. Subtract the input from the accumulator coming in on the same port(last).
4. jump to 'N' if the result is lower than zero. (JumpLowerZero)
5. Move the accumulator (also the result!) to the output
6. Jump to 'S' or start.
7. N: Negates the value because we need a positive answer.
8. move the negated result to the output.

From there the instruction pointer returns to the top and is ready for the next set of numbers.
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Ay, yi, yi.
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A little obsessed with ASCII and text at the moment.
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I doubt there is anyone interested in game programming that hasn't heard of this book... but for those who haven't, read it. It's the game programmer's interpretation of the Big Four's more popular patterns.

Oh, and it's free online.
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Wow, man. That's all really cool. No shortage of jobs for C++ programmers, no doubt, if you end up wanting to go square.

It's very impressive how you started school, stuck it out, and are now so close to finishing. You seem to be doing well, and I'm really glad to hear it.

I still haven't put the time in to learn Linux properly, and I haven't compiled and built a C++ program in many years, so I'll probably have to wait for the Windows binaries to get a first-hand look at your projects.

I'll be talking about stuff like game loops at this next Dart meetup of mine, but on a very rudimentary level, suitable for beginners. Looks like you're well past that now. One of the disadvantages of pushing a new technology is that everyone you ever meet is a beginner with it, so it's hard to move on to the cool, advanced stuff.

Anyway, good to see you're still out there. Perhaps we'll run into each other again sometime.
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Okay, this is sad. There's no where to complain about this other than on social media. I was just forced to change my eBay password. It would seem force you to hand-type in your password. I can't begin to explain how horrible of a practice this is.

This will have two side effects.

First the least likely; this makes your password susceptible to key loggers. They typically don't monitor your clip-board for cut and pastes. Not that I have stopped typing in passwords manually because of this. I find it easier to not type them in, and I find it more secure to store my many, many passwords in a key-encrypted file.

Second, this also encourages users to use shorter passwords. My passwords are typically 128-bit randomly generated (assuming the site will let me enter in a password that long). Try typing that in by hand. I'm uber-glad that all the financial information I have stored in eBay is years outdated. Instead I had to rely on a 40-bit generated password that was still a pain in the ass to have to type in by hand.

Either way, I'd discourage anyone from using their service until they change this policy. Not that anyone will. Except me. Insecure is insecure, and Erin just got her credit card stolen from using it on insecure sites that promised to be secure.

I was forced to buy something off eBay because I couldn't find another source for it. I will try harder next time to not have to use it. Oh best part is there's no one to contact at eBay to explain this to them. Not that they'd listen.

#eBayInsecurityIssues
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The CEO of Paradox Interactive talks about niche games. A few brilliant observations by a company that leads the market in niche gaming.
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Not being one for social media, as anyone who knows me knows. I still felt like I had to share this.

Last night I was reading, for the first time as a programmer, the Commodore 64 User's Guide. When I was a kid I remember going through it casually, wishing I had one small idea of what any of it meant. My father was an electronics engineer, because of that I was always enamored by the fancy diagrams in it.

Now I am reading it, understanding it, and once school frees up some time for me I'll be doing something I've waited thirty years for. Programming a Commodore 64.

I'll be honest, the thought brought up some emotion and I choked up a bit. And in case anyone is curious as to why I am learning how to program on a thirty year old computer; I'm using it to cut my teeth into low level assembly programming. It works like a more complex version of the assembler I learned on a simulated chip in my architecture class.

And the MOS 6502 processor is still used today. Produced by Western Digital, founded by Bill Mensch, father of the MOS 6502 and its decedents. Plus if you're a retro geek, it's really interesting stuff.
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+Monty Rasmussen Yeah, no way I am going to wrack up this amount of debt and not get a degree. So you should be glad if I wasn't. As the only way it could be interpreted is as my having graduated. Failure is not an option.
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Thomas Green

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This isn't news to me. But it's comforting.

If you think you're just bad at math, figure out if you have anxiety issues towards it. And if you do, get help. You aren't stupid.
Abstract A large field study of children in first and second grade explored how parents’ anxiety about math relates to their children’s math achievement. The goal of the study was to better understand why some students perform worse in math than others. We tested whether parents’ math anxiety predicts their children’s math achievement across the school year. We found that when parents are more math anxious, their children learn significantly less...
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Okay, gotta admit, I really, really miss OneNote. I wish the Mathematics plug-in was LaTex, but other than that it was fantastico. If only it worked in Linux too.

If anyone has a good suggestion for a decent, equivalent piece of note-taking software, I'd surely appreciate it. It doesn't have to have Equation support like LaTex or MS Mathematics, but I should be able to past images in that I generate from other LaTex applications like EqualX.

Oh, cross-platform is a bonus. Linux support is a must. I just got done abandoning Zim Notes, CherryTree, and right now I am trying out BasKet.
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Evernote has no decent Linux equivalent.

Google Keep isn't bad but I'd rather have a note taking system that doesn't rely on someone else's computer.

Haha I just logged into Google Keep to take a look at it. Apparently I already have, as I was greeted by a note that read "This is a test note. Why'd you come in here? Fuck off." Plus I'm currently trying to move away from Google's services.

Yeah. As one of Erin's instructors so ingeniously put it, "The Cloud" really just means someone else's computer. And while I love syncing capabilities so much I set up my own OwnCloud server, I'd prefer local copies instead of or in addition to remote ones.

Right now I am really digging BasKet. But no native Windows port for a while. It seems like if I want to meet my simple requirements of...

a) Rich Text
b) Image Support
c) Both Linux and Windows Native
d) Local Files
e) Doesn't totally suck.

...I think my cheese is out with the wind. I'm starting to learn why one of the most popular note-taking software is currently "Notepad document copied into Dropbox." So far, really the only thing that has met that requirement was Zim Notes and CherryTree, but they were both a little iffy on e).
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This one is mostly for Monty, but music buffs will find it interesting too...

For a while I was obsessed with this song. I'd become acutely aware of it being a notable part of my childhood about ten years ago. Over the period of about 4 years, I had the song bouncing in an out of my awareness, only able to glean parts of it from my memories.

During those four years I went from thinking I imagined this song to knowing who performed it. I remember having it go in and out of my memory for about a year, then one day I was in an Albertson's and they played it over the PA system. I spent the next two weeks trying to figure out who it was. For a short time, until I verified that it wasn't, I thought it was a McCartney song. It did sound a lot like Wings.

Anyway, I saw this on Reddit today, and it made me realize just how amazing this one song is. I'd explain how amazing it was, but that would negate the point of the watching the video. But I will at least mention this:

The most amazing part; the backing chorus. For the longest time I thought it was a synth. But they actually made a musical instrument out of a 16 track recorder using multiple vocal tracks layered. So what you're hearing, is three people singing, per note represented by one track looped repeatedly. Sixteen notes, and to play each note, they simply used console faders to drop the one being played, and slid up the one they wanted to play next...

Genius, and one of the most unique sounding tracks released in the 1970s. I hope you enjoy this as much as I did.
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Yes! It's been soooo long since I've heard that song. My dad was into those guys. After watching this documentary, I popped over to YouTube, dialed up the song, and laid back in my dark office with a pair of headphones on.

Not only is all that backing vocal amazing, but the headphones really highlighted how carefully they mixed the tracks in stereo. They were able to achieve such a balance, even though left and right are never really doing the same thing at the same time. This kind of careful orchestration was more common before the "wall of sound" technique caught on, and I miss it a lot.

The mid-'70s were an incredible time for innovation in audio engineering. Must've been nice to be a productive adult in a time when not everything had been done already. Haha...

Yeah, thanks for pointing this out to me. It was a nice end to a long, shitty day.  :)
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In case anyone is interested, not trying to advertise for them, but Black Sabbath's newest album... the first studio album with Ozzy, Tony, and Geezer, (Ward couldn't make it due to contractual obligations) in 35 years... It's absolutely fantastic. It's like they took up right after Vol. 4, instead of declining in to the bickering and eventual break up they did. I suggest if you are remotely interested, give it a listen.
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+Monty Rasmussen Glad to know you liked it. Now give me one back by doing my homework for me. Give me an algorithm that, given any regular language L, determines whether or not L = L^*. And remember, Google is cheating ;)
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