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Theodore Ts'o
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James Bottomley, Stacey, her brother, and I had dinner last night at the Herb Farm Restaurant in Woodinville, WA. The theme was "A Mycologist's Dream."
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For those who need something that's not Kavanaugh and not politics (Can we not get back to politics, yo?), I came across this amazing and authentic talk from Betsy Struxness about her experience being one of the original cast ensemble of Hamilton.
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Reagan: "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!"

The Republican Party today: "We won't promise to reject help from the Russians when they try to interfere with American elections."
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This is a fascinating article. And it puts to question whether or not "The only remedy is More Speech" is always true. In a world where everyone is rational, sure. But Richard Thaler was recently awarded Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for discovering that, in fact, humans are not rational actors, and to assume that in the course of economic theories would lead you down the primrose path.
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Excellent writing. Powerful words.
John McCain’s Funeral Was a Council of War—Just as He Meant It to Be: A dispatch from the National Cathedral.
"a morality play shot through with Shakespearian portent and foreshadowing, a pageant of democracy's vengeance."

by Charles P. Pierce
https://twitter.com/CharlesPPierce/status/1035994903543799808

"Yet somewhere under starlight or the sun, My father stands.
Aged, worn out with wars
On foot on horseback or in battle-cars.
I only ask what way my journey lies,
For He who made you bitter made you wise."

-- Cuchulain's Fight With The Sea, W.B. Yeats

WASHINGTON — In the magnificent, lordly church-house, there were speeches and prayers. There were songs and hymns. There were bands and pipers and choirs and soloists. John McCain was given a national send-off in a National Cathedral and there was a great gathering of emotion that was almost frightening in its intensity because you knew that it was aimed at a solitary, angry, unbalanced man left back at the White House, at someone who nonetheless is the president* of the United States, with all the powers inherent to his office, a man who has created a situation in which he is an object of dislike and disrespect, because that is all that he's given to the world in return.

It was said almost immediately after the conclusion of the funeral ceremonies on Saturday that, for a few hours anyway, we were back in a familiar country with familiar customs and manners and norms, a country with institutions built to last. That may well be true. I felt it, too. But in back of that is the realization that all of us, including the deceased, had taken those customs, manners, norms, and institutions terribly for granted. We thought they could withstand anything, even a renegade president* in the pocket of a distant authoritarian goon. We let the customs, manners, norms and institutions weaken through neglect and now we are in open conflict with an elected president and, make no mistake about it, John McCain's funeral was a council of war, and it was a council of war because that's what John McCain meant it to be.

He deliberately made known to people that the president* was not welcome at any of the services. He deliberately chose the previous two presidents to deliver the formal eulogies. He deliberately created that scene in the Capitol rotunda at which Mitch McConnell, Paul Ryan, and Mike Pence, an unholy trio of Trumpist quislings, had to choke down their own cowardice and say how much they loved him and his irascibility. He deliberately created a mirror in which, if they still have an ounce of self-awareness, they could see the rot that has set in on their souls. Even at the end, John McCain knew what he was doing and he was a fearsome opponent. He wanted a pageant of everything this administration* has trashed and put up for sale, and that's what he got Saturday—a morality play shot through with Shakespearian portent and foreshadowing, a pageant of democracy's vengeance.

This is not to minimize the genuine affection and love that was on display. John McCain was a beloved figure to many of the people who came to bid him farewell. But there was so much subtext under the proceedings that the mantle shattered, and subtext became text, plain as the rain that fell and passed while the service continued. This was a funeral with more than one purpose—to celebrate the passing of John McCain and to summon a rebirth of politics that did not so much reek of grift and vodka.
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In 1998, when I was traveling with McCain for a profile that ran in this magazine, I asked him if there was anyone involved with the Vietnam War that he couldn't bring himself to forgive. By then, he had made his peace with the antiwar movement; he delivered the eulogy for an antiwar activist whose speeches from Hanoi had been piped into his cell. He—along with John Kerry—had succeeded in normalizing relations between the United States and Vietnam. He had taken Walter Cronkite on a tour of his old prison. He'd even forgiven the guards who'd beaten and tortured him. A couple of years earlier, former Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, one of the architects of that bloody misadventure, had written a memoir in which he confessed that he'd known the war was unwindable as early as 1967, but that he had kept his mouth shut while the country slid more swiftly toward disaster. As it happens, October 26, 1967 was the day that John McCain's fighter jet had taken an anti-aircraft missile over Hanoi. So I asked him if there was someone he couldn't forgive, or at least talk to, about that awful time. He got all quiet and took a long time to answer.

"McNamara," he finally said. "That's the worst to me—to know you've made a mistake and to do nothing to correct it while, year after year, people are dying and to do nothing to stop it, to know what your public duty is and to ignore it. I don't think any conversation we could have would be helpful now."
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This was a really thoughtful conversation that covered a lot of ground --- from Kanye West, to Artificial Intelligence and Tech/Big Data. It's definitely worth a listen to while on a elliptical cycle or treadmill.
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According to this article, Mike Gustavision's previous job before he was Director of Security at Panera Bread? Senior Director of Security Operations at Equifax (2009-2013). I don't know enough about him to say that he's a hack, but.... it sure doesn't sound good.

I wonder if there are other security professions who had previously worked at Equifax which are now busily filing that off their resume....
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I've been listening to an old Cheryl Wheeler concert, and one of the last songs was this one. It made me think of all of the friends and colleagues that I worked with when I was at the IBM LTC in Portland. Unfortunately, I haven't had a good excuse to go and visit in many a year, so here's a shout out to them!

+John Stultz +Darren Hart +Paul McKenney (and many others)
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TIL --- how to "fix" evince so that the default zoom level is something sane, as opposed to seeing only a fraction of the page when opening a PDF:

gsettings set org.gnome.Evince.Default sizing-mode 'fit-page'

Ah, GNOME --- the same old "we'll be user friendly by removing confusiong settings UI". After all, experts can just figure out how to set a Windows-style registry key, can't they?
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Dear Lazyweb,

At one point there were some kernel patches to for a proposed feature where a userspace program could mark certain pages as "disposable" so the kernel could be allowed to steal the pages if necessary, but if there isn't memory pressure, the pages aren't immediately taken away. So in that way it's not like madvise(MADV_DONTNEED).

The use case is for a userspace cache which would act much like the page cache ---- if there's memory available, the userspace cache would remain available; but if the memory is needed for higher priority things, the kernel would be allowed to steal the pages from the process --- perhaps with some kind of signal notification at the time that the pages were taken away, or just letting the program notice by getting a seg fault when it tries accessing a page which has since been removed from the userspace cache.

I can't seem to find the necessary search keywords to find it, though. Does this ring a bell for anyone?
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