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The Electric Heads
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The Electric Heads
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Alright guys, IT IS TIME. The Electric Heads is upgrading itself. We are ready for The Electric Heads 2.0, and we want YOU to be a part of our team.
We are looking to build a world class organization. We want people from all over the world to collaborate and design with us, and create something that is TRULY special.
We KNOW you have what it takes to change the world and add value to lives everywhere. Not to mention your life!
We are starting at the ground floor.
We need partners who want to build this with us.
We have put many many hours into this and were ready to launch this thing into the stratosphere (figuratively and literally) but we need a team to help us do that. If you have skills we need them.

If you are interested send us your Name, Email, Phone Number, City/Country and a short written or video bio about yourself. Send via Email to electricheads@yahoo.com



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Harry Sayer's profile photoM Bazooi's profile photoAhmed Mehar's profile photo
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I m also available for this project 
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If only it worked that way!
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"DARPA has selected 10 performers for its Atoms to Product (A2P) program whose goal is to develop technologies and processes to assemble nanometer-scale pieces—whose dimensions are near the size of atoms—into systems, components, or materials that are at least millimeter-scale in size."

 
DARPA's Atoms to Product program aims to bring nanoscale precision and functionality to manufacturing methods and products. Machine Design takes a look at a second set of the program's funded projects. For more information on Atoms to Product, visit: http://www.darpa.mil/news-events/2015-12-29.
3D printing with functional nanoparticles may produce metamaterials with never-before-seen properties and characteristics.
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This is cool!
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Barrie Barrett's profile photoJared Hausmann's profile photoTony Bostony's profile photo
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The blue sperm in its natural office habitats. 
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Definitely gets your attention.
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Daniel Vrtel's profile photoHarshit Kasera's profile photopsychedelic medecine's profile photoPipe Dreams's profile photo
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+michael adams life is great. I do my best to ignore ads.

Just because someone speaks out strongly about something doesn't mean their life sucks.

Yall expect things to be too easy. The world isn't black and white, one way or the other.

It's full of color, every which way. Things are not as simple as "its this way or that way only". 
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But that feeling when you do get it right.
 
Happy #DevHumor Friday everyone!

Hope this little gem starts your weekend off with a bang.

Poor developer Spider-Man...
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Only one?
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Have them in circles
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I like this one!
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Trippy...
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You had me at cotton candy!
 
Cotton candy machines may hold the key for making life-sized artificial livers, kidneys, bones and other essential organs.
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This one always makes me laugh.
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Thought this was a cool use of VR. You could get trained in many skill this way.
 
It’s been a banner season for #technology in sports. Learn how a former +NFL player uses cutting-edge virtual reality videos to help players and coaches train better, faster and smarter: http://intel.ly/1UGX2Lq #iQ
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The Electric Heads
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Technology Throwback ( Technology History)  - 
 
This is a good read.
 
"What makes highly creative people different from the rest of us? In the 1960s, psychologist and creativity researcher Frank X. Barron set about finding out. Barron conducted a series of experiments on some of his generation's most renowned thinkers in an attempt to isolate the unique spark of creative genius.

In a historic study, Barron invited a group of high-profile creators—including writers Truman Capote, William Carlos Williams, and Frank O'Connor, along with leading architects, scientists, entrepreneurs, and mathematicians—to spend several days living in a former frat house on the University of California at Berkeley campus. The participants spent time getting to know one another, being observed by researchers, and completing evaluations of their lives, work, and personalities, including tests that aimed to look for signs of mental illness and indicators of creative thinking.

Barron found that, contrary to conventional thought at the time, intelligence had only a modest role in creative thinking. IQ alone could not explain the creative spark.

The creative genius is "occasionally crazier and yet adamantly saner than the average person." Instead, the study showed that creativity is informed by a whole host of intellectual, emotional, motivational and moral characteristics. The common traits that people across all creative fields seemed to have in common were an openness to one's inner life; a preference for complexity and ambiguity; an unusually high tolerance for disorder and disarray; the ability to extract order from chaos; independence; unconventionality; and a willingness to take risks.

Describing this hodgepodge of traits, Barron wrote that the creative genius was "both more primitive and more cultured, more destructive and more constructive, occasionally crazier and yet adamantly saner, than the average person."

This new way of thinking about creative genius gave rise to some fascinating—and perplexing—contradictions. In a subsequent study of creative writers, Barron and Donald MacKinnon found that the average writer was in the top 15% of the general population on all measures of psychopathology. But strangely enough, they also found that creative writers scored extremely high on all measures of psychological health.

Creative-minded people seemed to find an unusual synthesis between healthy and "pathological" behaviors. Why? Well, it seemed that creative people were more introspective. This led to increased self-awareness, including a greater familiarity with the darker and more uncomfortable parts of themselves. It may be because they engage with the full spectrum of life—both the dark and the light—that writers score high on some of the characteristics that our society tends to associate with mental illness. Conversely, this same propensity can lead them to become more grounded and self-aware. In openly and boldly confronting themselves and the world, creative-minded people seemed to find an unusual synthesis between healthy and "pathological" behaviors.

Such contradictions may be precisely what gives some people an intense inner drive to create. As psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi said after more than 30 years of observing creative people: "If I had to express in one word what makes their personalities different from others, it's complexity. They show tendencies of thought and action that in most people are segregated. They contain contradictory extremes; instead of being an 'individual,' each of them is a 'multitude.'"

Today, most psychologists agree that creativity is multifaceted in nature. And even on a neurological level, creativity is messy.

Contrary to the "right-brain" myth, creativity doesn't just involve a single brain region or even a single side of the brain. Instead, the creative process draws on the whole brain. It's a dynamic interplay of many different brain regions, emotions, and our unconscious and conscious processing systems.

The brain's default mode network, or as we like to call it, the "imagination network," is particularly important for creativity. The default mode network, first identified by neurologist Marcus Raichle in 2001, engages many regions on the medial (inside) surface of the brain in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes.

We spend as much as half our mental lives using this network. It appears to be most active when we're engaged in what researchers call "self-generated cognition": daydreaming, ruminating, or otherwise letting our minds wander.

The functions of the imagination network form the core of human experience. Its three main components are personal meaning-making, mental simulation, and perspective taking. This allows us to construct meaning from our experiences, remember the past, think about the future, imagine other people's perspectives and alternative scenarios, understand stories, and reflect on mental and emotional states—both our own and those of others. The imaginative and social processes associated with this brain network are also critical to developing compassion, as well as the ability to understand ourselves and construct a linear sense of self.

But the imagination network doesn't work alone. It engages in an intricate dance with the brain's executive network, which is responsible for controlling our attention and working memory. The executive network helps us focus our imagination, blocking out external distractions and allowing us to tune in to our inner experience.

The creative brain is particularly good at flexibly activating and deactivating these brain networks, which in most people are at odds with each other. In doing so, they are able to juggle seemingly contradictory modes of thought—cognitive and emotional, deliberate and spontaneous. This allows them to draw on a wide range of strengths, characteristics and thinking styles in their work.

Perhaps this is why creative people are so difficult to pin down. In both their creative processes and their brain processes, they bring seemingly contradictory elements together in unusual and unexpected ways."
Artists can juggle seemingly contradictory modes of thought.
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San T
 
apparently that is me :)
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Brains.
 
Research Replicates a Folding Human Brain in 3D

Study substantiates a simple mechanical framework for how the human brain folds.

The research will appear in Nature Physics.

#neuroscience
Study substantiates a simple mechanical framework for how the human brain folds.The distinctive troughs and crests of the human brain are not present in most animals; highly folded brains are seen
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