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Drunkduck
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FEATURED COMIC -> Scared by the Bell
Read: http://www.theduckwebcomics.com/Scared_by_the_Bell/
Poor Peter doesn't know what he's in for... His very first day at a new school and the other kids are monsters, LITERAL monsters that is. He shares class with a Frankenstein's monster, a vampire, a mummy, and a Cthulhu to name a few. This was certainly NOT what he was expecting! He's just a normal kid afterall. It's going to be very interesting to see how he copes!
This is a black and white comic, all conventionally drawn, in simple, cartoon styled line art. The characters look great and the art is pretty consistent. It's a very funny, monster high school story. This comic is just starting so it's easy to get into and catch up. It updates weekly!
Read Scared by the Bell, by Dylandrawsdraws, rated E.
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Quackcast 320 - Making the reader believe
LISTEN: http://www.theduckwebcomics.com/quackcast/episode-320-making-the-reader-believe

In this Quackcast I wanted to talk about the magic of authorship: how the creator of a story sets up the whole situation so that they can convince the reader of anything. You can write a story about the smartest man in the world, and the reader will believe that they are, within the story, because you set it up that way: not just by having other characters reacting to them and forming that impression, but also independently convincing the audience of it as well by having them solving riddles and such or knowing lots of languages, quoting literary texts etc, but the creator doesn't have to be a very smart person themselves…
Like Sherlock Holmes is seen as super smart because he's meant to, but Arthur Conan Doyle wasn't a super genius himself.
You can write about a Casanova type charmer who's fantastic with the opposite sex and readers will believe, but only if you set the stage well enough.
You as the creator set the parameters for anything to happen. Without having certain abilities or skills yourself, you can create a character with totally convincing skills far outside of yourself.

The music for this week by Gunwallace is for The Gloom, it's creepy, ghostly, unsettling, uneven. This one gets under your skin and keeps you off-balance.

Topics and shownotes

Featured comic:
Slaughter at Camp Notamoovi - http://www.theduckwebcomics.com/news/2017/apr/18/featured-comic-slaughter-at-camp-notamoovi/

Special thanks to:
Gunwallace - http://www.virtuallycomics.com/
Pitface - http://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/PIT_FACE/
Tantz Aerine - http://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/Tantz_Aerine
Banes - http://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/Banes/

Featured music:
The Gloom - http://www.theduckwebcomics.com/The_Gloom/, by Avart, rated M.
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Righteous Webcomic Reaches 50 Page Milestone!

RIGHTEOUS, best known on Drunk Duck as being the last featured comic of 2016 has a milestone announcement. The comic is now 50 (and still fabulous) after reaching the milestone last week.

The creator, righteouscomic, is inviting everyone on The Duck to join in on the special occasion by reading through the archive.


http://www.theduckwebcomics.com/RIGHTEOUS/
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Carl Jung is Your Friend (part 1)
From here: http://www.theduckwebcomics.com/news/2017/apr/21/carl-jung-is-your-friend-part-1/

I’ll start today by talking a bit about one of the superstars in the field of Psychology (please don’t groan, it’s for a good cause):

Carl Jung was a Swiss psychologist and psychiatrist (the super sayan combo in our field). He is considered the founder of analytical psychology, which is a school within the psychodynamic/psychoanalytical approach emphasizing the importance of the psyche and centering the motivations for humans in their striving for “wholeness”.

As you might imagine if you have at any point dabbled in psychology, Jung was pretty influenced by Sigmund Freud, and he basically postulated a different conceptualization of the psychodynamic model Freud had theorized .

One of the major changes Jung suggested was about the unconscious and its qualities. Jung suggested that humans are not born tabula rasa, but instead with pre-installed information called “the collective unconscious”: the part of our minds that we all collectively share, respond to and draw from.

And this is why he is your friend when you’re sitting down to construct stories and characters! (Jung has been quite influential in literature)

According to Jung, in our collective unconscious there exists a library of instincts and archetypes. For now, it’s the archetypes that we’ll be focusing on:

Archetypes are patterns of events, personality, behavior, motivations and thoughts that are coded into a ‘profile’ of sorts, and from which individuals draw in order to understand and interact with their (primarily) social environment and life. These archetypes are shaped by culture, history and core cultural elements of human civilization- and they are unconsciously recognized by all of us. This capacity to recognize and connect to archetypes in people and personalities we encounter, as well as in the stories of these people, is what makes Carl Jung our best of friends as creators of stories and, consequently characters within a story.

If when creating a character we give it a consistent Jungian archetypal base before we construct him/her for the purposes of our story, then it is extremely likely that our audience will emotionally engage with the character, exactly because we will be tapping into the collective unconscious that we all share. And because it’s unconscious, nearly reflexive reaction to the stimulus of such a character, the emotional engagement is likely to be very solid and your audience will love, sympathize, hate, despise exactly as you want them to do in your story, be it a novel, a graphic novel or a movie.

When creating a story, the core of it is bound to have at least one of Jung’s archetypal events and/or motifs, if stripped down to the absolute essentials (yes, that’s why every plot has already been told, and that doesn’t at all matter).

What are these Jungian Archetypes then?

There are Archetypal Events, Archetypal motifs and Archetypal figures.

Archetypal Events are six: Birth, Death, Separation from parents, Initiation, Marriage and the Union of Opposites.

Archetypal Motifs are three: Apocalypse, Deluge, Creation.

Is it starting to sound familiar as far as plots are concerned?

Archetypal Figures are nine: Great Mother, Father, Child, Devil, God, Wise Old Man, Wise Old Woman, Trickster, Hero

These should also be ringing a bell.

But listing them is not enough. So in this little ‘mini series’ of newsposts, I’ll be talking about each archetypal category and examples we encounter in literature, as well as ways to incarnate them with originality in our stories.

Next time then, would you like me to talk about the Events, the Motifs or the Figures? (It won’t be boring, I promise)
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Drawn Together

Let me start off by distracting y'all from my complete and total failure to even show up last week by saying, hey! to celebrate TEN YEARS of PUTRID MEAT, Pit Face has made this special behind the scenes “the making of…” video for y'all! Check it out!
https://youtu.be/ciVOLjSz87Y

And also by wishing a very happy Iggy Pop's Birthday to each and every one of ya.

Anyhow! When I can't think of a good topic I say to myself, well what have I been doin' or thinkin' about or lookin' at this week? Sometimes that amounts to subject matter wholly inappropriate for a public forum. By sometimes I mean usually. Always. Crap. Sometimes I can twist it enough to coax it into a suitable blog. This may or may not be one of them times; let's find out together!

That's actually just what i'ma talk to ya about this week: working together! Well, working with other artists and writers, that is: collaboration! I've had my good and bad experiences with it myself, and generally fall into the “does not play well with others” category. I was the control freak kid in group projects that would end up doin' all the work myself on account of being totally convinced my peers would just fuck it up. But this week I was lucky enough to get a visit from my favorite (read: to date, only successful) collaborator, so I did a lot of that.


I'ma assume we all know basic comic industry history and that for the most part, titles will have separate individuals writing, penciling, inking, lettering, and coloring books. For mass production and monthly deadlines that's just more efficient. I'ma also go out on s limb and assume most of y'all, like myself, do all the heavy lifting yer own self. While working solo gives you complete creative control, which the control freak kid in me pretty much demands, I do dig workin' with like-minded artists and seeing how riffing off their work or working with their characters or ideas influences the decisions I make working on a piece or a comic.

There are lots of fun comic jam type exercises you can do: have one person script, another pencil, and yet another ink; trade off doing panels or pages of the same story. Or just pass a page back and forth until it's done. The possibilities are pretty endless. In this drawing I did the pencils, my collaborator laid down color, then we both inked.

Here's another that I started pencils on, then came back in to finish after he had laid down color and some basic linework.

Here's the pencils before his inks.

This one is interesting because some of the decisions I made inking were based on how he interpreted (or in cases misinterpreted) my original lines. I definitely recognize my hand in the drawing here, but there's a looseness and dimensionality to it that wouldn't have been there had I drawn the piece alone.

Another reason I dig working with or around others is seeing different tricks or aspects of others' process that I might not come up with on my own. I'm constantly mining for techniques to borrow (read: blatantly rip off) and apply to my own stuff.

So whattaya think? Did I pull it off? Is this a blog? Can I go back to drawing comics now? What about y'all- what's yer best or worst collaboration experiences? Good ideas for projects with pals? C'mon, let's collaborate on this here thing so I feel less like I'm coppin' out!

image credits: Josh Bayer and Hyena Hell. You can find more of Josh's work on Instagram, Facebook, or anywhere on the internet seriously the dude is prolific as fuck. Check out his anthology series “suspect device” or his latest project, “All Time Comics” with Fantagraphics at yer local comic shop or the internet, again. 
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21/04/2017
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COMEDY - part two - Creating Comedic Characters
Posted here: http://www.theduckwebcomics.com/news/2017/apr/19/comedy-part-two-creating-comedic-characters/

Last week I looked at a theory of the “comedy premise” that has to do with crossing the mundane with the unusual.

Here's that post:

http://www.theduckwebcomics.com/news/2017/apr/12/comedy-part-one-the-premise/

This week: Creating Comedic Characters!

Using the same principle as the “premise” creation, we can craft endless numbers of comedy CHARACTERS.

The first step is to choose a comedic perspective. That's the character's way of seeing the world or a general “type” for the character. Some examples:

-Virtuous Priest
-Boisterous Drunk
-Human-looking Robot
-Innocent/Naive
-Con Artist
-Workaholic
-Serial Killer

I think that's the idea (this stuff, like last week's, is from John Vorhaus' book “The Comic Toolkit”)

The idea goes that from your endless list of Comic Perspectives, the best ones will be the ones that are most removed from “average”.

So, a “workaholic” is not as inherently interesting as the perspective of an alien, or an extreme OCD person, or the almost-otherworldly eccentricity of Kramer from Seinfeld.

The actual phrase Vorhaus uses is “STRONG comic perspective”. The stronger (more unusual) that perspective is, the better.

EXAGGERATION

The second principle to fold into this is Exaggeration. The perspective is to be exaggerated as much as you can. That can often solve the problem of perspectives that aren't as inherently “different”.

If George Costanza's perspective is “pettiness” or “selfishness” - it's not quite enough. Exaggerating this perspective to the Nth degree is what helps him become the brilliant comic character he is.

Ditto Ebenezer Scrooge and his “greed” perspective.

Jughead is not just apathetic to girls and having a hearty appetite. He's asexual and a food-chomping machine!

Though I didn't create my own comic characters this way, I've analysed them with it, and the characters who are most “off the reservation” and exaggerated the most are by far the strongest characters, and most enjoyed by readers: Penelope is not just innocent and muscle-bound - she's the ultimate naive ditz, and the strongest woman in the world. TK goes against the grain in every conceivable way, and is the consummate cynic.

A lot of comedy is about extremes. So find a character's perspective, then exaggerate it!

Next time we'll add some other qualities to these half baked characters and round them out.

ciao for niao!


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FEATURED COMIC -> Slaughter at Camp Notamoovi

Sexy teens, a summer camp down by a lake, hormones, a mysterious legend of a roaming monster, and ancient Indian burial ground… all the ingredients are here and ready for a deadly red soup of murder! And a good old fashioned classic sex comedy. My fave characters so far are Sandra Van Dyke the douchey lesbian and Patricia O'Brien the aggressive Irish girl. This comic is a LOT of fun!
The art is black and white, the style is a sex-comedy, horror thriller. I have only two criticisms of the comic: the text in the beginning is a little hard to read and character lines are sometimes a little clumsy. Apart from that it's pretty good and always improving!
BE AWARE: this comic is rated Mature and there are instances of full frontal nudity.

Read Slaughter at Camp Notamoovi, by Freakenburger, rated M. http://www.theduckwebcomics.com/Slaughter_at_Camp_Notamoovi/
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FEATURED COMIC -> Slaughter at Camp Notamoovi

Sexy teens, a summer camp down by a lake, hormones, a mysterious legend of a roaming monster, and ancient Indian burial ground… all the ingredients are here and ready for a deadly red soup of murder! And a good old fashioned classic sex comedy. My fave characters so far are Sandra Van Dyke the douchey lesbian and Patricia O'Brien the aggressive Irish girl. This comic is a LOT of fun!
The art is black and white, the style is a sex-comedy, horror thriller. I have only two criticisms of the comic: the text in the beginning is a little hard to read and character lines are sometimes a little clumsy. Apart from that it's pretty good and always improving!
BE AWARE: this comic is rated Mature and there are instances of full frontal nudity.

Read Slaughter at Camp Notamoovi, by Freakenburger, rated M. http://www.theduckwebcomics.com/Slaughter_at_Camp_Notamoovi/
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The Art of Constellations
(written by kawaiidaigakusei)

The night sky in southern California has been clear the last couple of nights. When I look up at the sky I see Orion the Hunter and the clear dots that make up the Big Dipper. The night sky shows different constellations depending on where you live around the world and I spend most of my year in the northern hemisphere, which limits the constellations I get to enjoy on a daily basis.

I am unsure how rest of the world studies the stars, but whenever I go to the planetarium, there is usually a light show that recreates the night sky in a dome theater. After a few minutes of staring at clusters of white dots, the animations are projected on the screen that outline each constellation with its corresponding group of stars. I had an issue with the constellation animations because they were so intricate and full of detail that they were completely different from the simple group of stars that it represented.

Creating an image out of a constellation seems so simple, like connecting the dots. I like to think of myself as a creative person, but I have a difficult making out the outline of a large bear when I stare at Ursa major, the big dipper, when all I really see is a saucepan with a crooked handle.

What is your favorite constellation? (In addition to Orion and the Big Dipper, I am partial to Scorpius.)


Image: Ursa Major constellation from Uranographia by Johannes Hevelius
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