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The Pipe and Glass Inn
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The Pantry the magazine of The Pipe and Glass Inn online.

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Fine art and food have always gone hand-in-hand – we’re delighted to team up with the Artmarket Gallery to offer this unique evening
Fine art meets fine food – an evening with Bob Barker at the Pipe and Glass Inn

East Yorkshire’s first and only Michelin-starred restaurant has teamed up with a Cottingham gallery to offer an evening of fine food and art.
The Pipe and Glass is the venue for an evening in the company of one of Yorkshire’s favourite artists, Bradford’s Bob Barker, on Thursday 1 May.

Hosted by the award-winning Artmarket Gallery, Cottingham, the evening will start with a private viewing of Bob’s art, including a specially commissioned painting inspired by the Pipe and Glass.
The original will be on show alongside a small number of limited edition giclée prints signed by both Bob and the Pipe and Glass’s chef/owner, James Mackenzie.

James has created a four-course menu for the evening based around the titles of some of Bob’s paintings – a starter of salmon three ways will go under the name of Perfect Match, while the main course, Nice Weather for Ducks, will be roast duck breast with a crispy confit duck pasty, savoy cabbage, and Chips and Gravy. A pudding of pistachio and cherry bakewell tart with dark chocolate sorbet is named We Go Together Like A Wish And A Smile, while The Passion is a selection of Yorkshire cheeses.

And James and Bob aim to Spread A Little Happiness by rounding off dinner with coffee and treats. Throughout the evening there will be talks from Bob and James, live sketching by Bob, and a charity auction.
Bob is known for his nostalgic images of his home county, and says: “Where I live it is impossible to walk a dozen yards from home without seeing old weavers' cottages, cotton and woollen mills, Yorkshire stone flags or cobbled streets that have been there for decades settling in and maturing, watching the landscape change around them. 

“Every day I get to see and paint this history and people get to share it with me through my paintings. I eat, breathe and sleep painting – and I love every minute of it.”

James says: “Fine art and food have always gone hand-in-hand – we’re delighted to team up with the Artmarket Gallery to offer this unique evening.”

Robert Power, director of the Artmarket Gallery says: “Bob is one of our most popular artists – this will be a wonderful evening, and a unique opportunity to meet the man behind the paintbrush.”
Places cost £60 (drinks not included), and any special dietary requirements can be accommodated – please advise at time of booking.

For further information or to book a place, please contact the Artmarket Gallery on 01482 876003 or email gallery@artmarket.co.uk
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2014-04-07
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Fine art meets fine food – an evening with Bob Barker at the Pipe and Glass Inn

East Yorkshire’s first and only Michelin-starred restaurant has teamed up with a Cottingham gallery to offer an evening of fine food and art.
The Pipe and Glass is the venue for an evening in the company of one of Yorkshire’s favourite artists, Bradford’s Bob Barker, on Thursday 1 May.

Hosted by the award-winning Artmarket Gallery, Cottingham, the evening will start with a private viewing of Bob’s art, including a specially commissioned painting inspired by the Pipe and Glass.
The original will be on show alongside a small number of limited edition giclée prints signed by both Bob and the Pipe and Glass’s chef/owner, James Mackenzie.

James has created a four-course menu for the evening based around the titles of some of Bob’s paintings – a starter of salmon three ways will go under the name of Perfect Match, while the main course, Nice Weather for Ducks, will be roast duck breast with a crispy confit duck pasty, savoy cabbage, and Chips and Gravy. A pudding of pistachio and cherry bakewell tart with dark chocolate sorbet is named We Go Together Like A Wish And A Smile, while The Passion is a selection of Yorkshire cheeses.

And James and Bob aim to Spread A Little Happiness by rounding off dinner with coffee and treats. Throughout the evening there will be talks from Bob and James, live sketching by Bob, and a charity auction.
Bob is known for his nostalgic images of his home county, and says: “Where I live it is impossible to walk a dozen yards from home without seeing old weavers' cottages, cotton and woollen mills, Yorkshire stone flags or cobbled streets that have been there for decades settling in and maturing, watching the landscape change around them. 

“Every day I get to see and paint this history and people get to share it with me through my paintings. I eat, breathe and sleep painting – and I love every minute of it.”

James says: “Fine art and food have always gone hand-in-hand – we’re delighted to team up with the Artmarket Gallery to offer this unique evening.”

Robert Power, director of the Artmarket Gallery says: “Bob is one of our most popular artists – this will be a wonderful evening, and a unique opportunity to meet the man behind the paintbrush.”
Places cost £60 (drinks not included), and any special dietary requirements can be accommodated – please advise at time of booking.

For further information or to book a place, please contact the Artmarket Gallery on 01482 876003 or email gallery@artmarket.co.uk
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2014-04-07
4 Photos - View album

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What Does Spring Have To Offer Us: Spring Onions

It is quite ironic that spring is the season of spring onions. Not because of the name but because of the connotations surrounding this season such as transformation and renewal. This is due to the fact that the soils of the earth reawaken and after the dreary, cold winter season, it bursts with new life. Many people use this season as a time to refresh, hence the old spot of ‘spring cleaning’. It is also a popular time to start contemplating a healthier and more fulfilling lifestyle. So the reason why it is ironic that spring onions are harvested in spring is because of their amazing nutritional benefits and thus this is a great food for people who are wanting to get some significant nutrients into their body. 


Throughout History

Spring onions are famous for its plain looks with intense flavour. They are harvested when they are young and immature before the plant and blub grow big which is why they are known to have an appealing and sleek look. Onions and its different branches have been eaten since prehistoric times including the Egyptians, Greek and Romans. They have also been referred to in Chinese literature as they have grown in Chinese gardens for over five thousand years. It seems that the Chinese were aware of the goodness of the vegetable because they have been used in many traditional medicines. 


Nutritional Benefits

They have the nutritional benefits of ‘greens’ and onions making them a phenomenal food. Here is a list of their endless goodness:

First of all they are very rich in Vitamin A, B complex, C and K, which are all essential for a variety of reasons

Vitamin A – is good for the immune system and fights cancer as it inhibits the production of DNA in cancerous cells

Vitamin B complex - eases stress, reduces heart-disease risk, helps with anxiety and depression

Vitamin C – prevents immune system deficiencies, prenatal health problems and cardiovascular disease

Vitamin K – the nutrient for better bone health
They contain plenty of minerals including, copper, manganese, iron and

calcium

Copper – prevents premature aging, increases energy production, and heals wounds quickly

Manganese – benefits bone structure, and proper functioning of thyroid glands

Iron – plays a significant role in the production of haemoglobin and red blood cells, reduces fatigue and strengthens the immune system

Calcium – strengthens bones and teeth

Spring onions also have anti-viral and anti-bacterial properties which help to treat viral infections, cold and flu

If you suffer from arthritis or joint pain, spring onions will help you because they lessen inflammation

The vegetable contains sulphur compounds which helps to reduce the risk of coronary heart diseases because it controls blood pressure levels

If you have diabetes, the chromium in spring onions is great at controlling blood sugar levels, and improves glucose intolerance

Pectin is also found in spring onions and reduces the chances of developing cancers especially colon cancer

It regulates metabolism

Prevents eye disease and eye problems

The allicin in the vegetable is good for the skin and protects it from wrinkling

To prepare this variety of onion, first of all trim the roots and strip any of the outer leaves before slicing. Some recipes will want the white part of the vegetable, however do not underestimate the delicate green tops as they have a milder appeal. 

Many people enjoy the vegetable raw in a salad or sandwich. Alternatively it can be cooked in a stir fry, or omelette, so if you want a rejuvenating spring this year spring onions are for you.
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James Mackenzie named as one of top 50 in hospitality in the north

East Yorkshire chef James Mackenzie has been named as one of the top 50 most important and influential people within the Northern hospitality industry.

James and his wife Kate run the Michelin-starred Pipe and Glass Inn at South Dalton, near Beverley.
James was yesterday named as one of this year’s NRB Top 50 Best Northern Operators at the Northern Restaurant and Bar 2014 show, being held at Manchester Central yesterday and today (18 and 19 March). The prestigious list highlights the most important and influential individuals within the hospitality industry in the north.

Previous NRB Top 50 lists have included chefs Simon Rogan, Nigel Haworth, Terry Laybourne and Andrew Pern.
James said: “I was born, grew up and trained in the north, and have spent most of my professional life here. It means a lot to me to be named as one of the most influential people in hospitality in the region, especially in a list that also includes such amazing people.”
Last autumn, The Pipe and Glass Inn retained its Michelin star for the fifth consecutive year. It has won numerous other awards, including the Michelin Eating Out in Pub Guide’s coveted national Pub of the Year Award in 2012, and being named as one of the top 100 restaurants in the country in The National Restaurant Awards 2013. It is the Good Pub Guide’s County Dining Pub of the Year for Yorkshire 2014. 

In January, it was named as fourth best gastropub in the UK in the Budweiser Budvar Top 50 Gastropub Awards – the highest placed gastropub in the north.

The NRB show is the largest hospitality trade show in the UK outside London. For further information on it and the NRB Top 50 Awards: www.northernrestaurantandbar.co.uk
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WHAT IS WELL AND TRULY AMONG THE PEARLS? A LOOK AT THE HISTORY AND NUTRITIONAL VALUE OF OYSTERS

In today’s day and age we associate Oysters with sophistication and indulgent eating, but you will be surprised to know that amongst the Oysters long history, it was once a food embraced by the poor in the Victorian Era. Here is a look back deep into the history and facts surrounding the organism that brings us pearls. 

An Oyster is the name given to a number of Bivalve Molluscs (bivalve meaning two shells). Some people eat Oysters raw, whilst others prefer to enjoy the delicacy smoked or baked. 

Before the Romans had arrived on our land in 43AD, shellfish was something eaten only when there was no other fish or meat to be eaten. However this was all to change on the arrival of the Empire because they were very enthusiastic about eating all types of fish. In fact shells of oysters have been found on the sites of old Roman forts, towns and villas. 

Soon after the Romans left, the infectious love for shellfish, turned out to be not so infectious and they were rarely eaten for centuries. This was until the Norman Conquest in the 11th Century when they started using the old Roman technique for transporting it inland. 
Apart from the shellfish being a deluxe delicacy, it is also highly beneficial from a nutritional perspective.

Oysters contain:

Proteins- which are used by the body to build strong bones, skins, muscles and cells. Unlike carbohydrates the body is unable to store proteins and therefore your intake of protein should be daily

Irons- this mineral is responsible for transporting oxygen to your body cells. It also regulates your body temperature and is said to strengthen your immune system. If your intake of iron is not sufficient enough it could cause anaemia

Omega 3 fatty acids – these are really good for your joints, vision, skin, brain and heart. It also helps lower your cholesterol

Zinc – in Oysters, zinc levels are very high. Zinc is responsible for maintaining a healthy immune system. This means that your body is more equipped for fighting illnesses as well as healing wounds

Vitamin C – protects the body from free radical damage that can cause heart disease or cancer. It is also a good vitamin for the immune system

Important note: When you select your Oysters ensure that they have been harvested according to the safety guidelines.

This type of shellfish can be used in many great dishes including; Duck with Oyster sauce, Oyster Rockefeller, or with Singapore-style noodles to name but a few. So if you like shellfish, and want to benefit from the fact that it is exceptionally good for you, get inventive and start cooking with them.

The Michelin-starred Pipe and Glass Inn stands on the site of the original gate house to Dalton Park and offers one of the greatest exclusive Michelin star restaurants. Come visit James and Kate Mackenzie at the Pipe and Glass Inn.

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THE WONDERS OF A CLEMENTINE
Often associated as a healthy offering at Christmas time, the Clementine is in season from October right through to February. The reason why they are often so appealing is due to their desirable seedless characteristic which sets them apart from the tangerine. They are typically a sweet and juicy fruit which are less acidic than other oranges. 
Another reason why Clementine’s are so loved is because of how easy they are to consume. For instance all you need to do is simply peel the skin and then it is easily separated into a minimum of eight sections. This makes them a popular piece of fruit in many children’s lunchboxes.
The exact origin of this variety of orange is debatable. It was first thought that they were discovered by a Father Clement Rodier whom was growing fruit in his garden for an Algerian orphanage. It is believed that two different species of citrus fruit created a hybrid which formed the Clementine’s that we know and love today. On the contrary to this, others state that it actually originated in China several thousand years ago where accounts have been found describing something similar to the nature of a Clementine.
There are many nutritional benefits of a Clementine such as:
• It clementine is rich in vitamin C like other members of the orange family. This particular vitamin cannot be produced inside the human body and therefore has to be taken externally. It is vital that we get vitamin C into our body because it boosts the immune system and also fights cardiovascular disorders. A lack of vitamin C can lead to horrible diseases such as scurvy which is commonly associated with sailors between the 16th and 18th centuries
• The fruit contains a high amount of fibers which helps the functioning of the digestive system.
• Clementines are also high in potassium which is a mineral important for mental alertness and storage of energy. It also keeps your heartbeat regular.
The growing season for the clementine does not overlap with the traditional orange and therefore you can gain the great benefits of a citrus fruit even when other members of the orange family are not in season.
Here are some great easy ideas for how you could cook Clementines, for example you could try making:
• Orange marmalade
• Add it into a wintry salad with some sliced red onions, walnut and melted Brie
• A nice warm baked clementine cake
• Clementine, cranberry and pork
Whatever you choose to do with your Clementines it is sure to taste wonderful. So instead of just adding one to your pack-up why not get inventive and make some great dishes with this citrus fruit.

http://www.pipeandglass.co.uk/

CHRISTMAS MEANS THAT IT IS TIME FOR THE BRUSSEL SPROUTS

Love them or loathe them, Brussel sprouts are a much loved Christmas tradition in many homes. But where did these little things originate from, and how can you make them taste so good?

The first ever reference to the Brussel Sprout was as early as the 1200s in Belgium. This is where it was first cultivated in large quantities hence why it has been given the name ‘Brussel’ after its capital city. Interestingly, sprouts were also cherished by ancient Rome in Italy. They didn’t catch on though through northern Europe until the 16th century, where its popularity soared. 

As expected Brussel sprouts are of the same species as the cabbage, but also of the broccoli, kale, collard greens and kohlrabi. Not only can they taste brilliantly, but they are also highly nutritional. Below are just a few key reasons why Brussel sprouts are good for you:

Research and studies have found a link between a chemical in sprouts – Sulforaphane- which is thought to contain anti-cancer properties. However, when you boil Brussel sprouts the level of this chemical may be reduced and thus it is best to either steam, stir-fry or microwave them.

The sodium and fat content in them are both quite low which means that eating them is healthy for your heart. Foods with high fats will result in fat accumulating in your arteries which causes heart problems. Additionally, sodium is linked with cardiovascular problems. 
Brussel sprouts are also a very good source of vitamin C which functions as an antioxidant. It also keeps cells healthy and protected.
What is so different about Brussel sprouts in comparison to their ancestor –the cabbage- is that they grow upwards. Additionally they are accused of having a strong flavour for a vegetable, however some say that this is only the case if they are over cooked. Another quirky theory is that those who dislike Brussel sprouts have a different enzyme in their mouth that makes the vegetable taste sour!

One way to make sure that you have a good Brussel sprout is to make sure that they are fresh. It is preferable that they are bought with the stalks still attached for the ultimate freshness, however if they are sold loose then you should inspect them. Look out for yellow or discoloured leaves, or even worse yet brown root ends that appear dry should be discarded.

There are many great ways to cook and serve Brussel sprouts. So if you have a few left over this Christmas, why not fry them with some bacon, dried fruit and almonds, or make a warm hearty Brussel sprouts soup.

The Michelin-starred Pipe and Glass Inn stands on the site of the original gate house to Dalton Park and offers one of the greatest exclusive restaurants Yorkshire. Come visit our quality restaurant Yorkshire.

http://www.pipeandglass.co.uk/

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OH THAT OLD CHESTNUT!

As the winter nights are drawing in and the temperature is falling, this can only mean one thing … it is time for the chestnut season. Chestnuts start becoming in season from October in the UK, but the peak of the season hits us between November and December. In the culinary world, eating foods in season is fashionable. This is because the food will not only be at its best and ripest, but it is also readily available making it cheaper!



History of the Chestnut

The chestnut dates back to prehistoric times, whereby it is said that the nut steered a Greek Army (401-399 BC) away from bother! Yes, the legend states that this army who were retreating from Asia Minor survived because they had a large store of chestnuts available to them.  

However, it was first introduced to Europe from Sardis as a 'Sardian nut', since then it has been a staple food in Europe, Turkey and eastern Asia for over a millennia.



Nutritional Value

Chestnuts have a high nutritional value. Firstly, they contain no cholesterol and very little fat. Just like the rest of the nut family, the chestnut is gluten free. Moreover it contains a variety of vitamins and minerals such as:

• Vitamin C: the chestnut is a unique nut, because of the fact that it is the only one in the family that contains Vitamin C. This vitamin is important because it is needed for the growth and repair of tissues. It is used to form a protein which makes skin, ligaments, tendons and blood vessels. This means that it can heal wounds by forming scar tissues, and maintains as well as repairs your cartilage bones. The benefits of Vitamin C doesn't stop here! It is also an antioxidant which offers protection against harmful radicals.
• Iron: is an essential mineral as it helps carry oxygen around the body.
• Calcium: has several functions. It helps strengthen bones and teeth, regulates muscle contractions and ensures blood clots normally.
• Magnesium: helps keep your blood pressure normal, heart rhythm steady and your bones nice and strong.
• Phosphorus: required for cells to function properly. It also regulates calcium for strong bones and teeth.
• Zinc: this mineral stimulates some of the enzymes in your body to help support your immune system. It also helps healthy growth development and so it is especially important during childhood, adolescence and pregnancy
• Potassium: your body requires this mineral in order to build proteins and muscles, and maintaining normal body growth

So as you can see the old chestnut is very good for you. What a great reason to get stuck in!



Ways to preserve your chestnuts

If you are collecting your own chestnuts the best time to get them is when the leaves fall. But don't lose the race between you and the squirrels. You should aim to to collect them as soon as they hit the ground before they start deteriorating on the forest floor.

When assembling your chestnuts together do not confuse them with Horse chestnuts (also known as conkers). You can tell the two apart because the sweet chestnuts pods have longer spikes on them which are more hairy in appearance. 

If you are keeping the chestnuts until Christmas, make sure that first of all you vigorously check for holes and cracks in the nut. Those that you find do have cracks or holes in should be discarded. The best way to freeze your nuts is by blanching them beforehand. You are then best peeling them straight away as the skins will come off easier this way.

If you are planning to roast your chestnuts keep them hanging in a onion bag. This will allow the air to circulate around them to prevent them from going damp which will turn them mouldy.



Ideas to cook your chestnut

There are lots of things that you could do with your chestnuts. You could roast them, fry them, mill them into flour, boil them, steam them and even grill them. One particular English favourite is roasted chestnuts. These have the texture of a baked potato but with a sweet and nutty flavour.

Why not try a chestnut and truffle chocolate cake or using it as a stuffing in meat?



In a nutshell …

It is finally that time of year again when there is a chance for you to start grabbing your chestnuts. And if you have never tried a chestnut before, maybe 2013 could be the year?

http://www.pipeandglass.co.uk

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Why Pipe and Glass Inn isn't just any old place

The Pipe and Glass Inn has achieved an incredible status since its refurbishment in 2006. Once an old gate house to Dalton Park estate, it has been completely transformed into a destination dining gastropub whilst managing to keep its local pub atmosphere.

The term 'gastropub' was coined in 1991 when David Eyre and Mike Belben took over a pub in London called 'The Eagle'. This concept of converging pub culture with British Dining has become a phenomenon in public houses across Britain. Gastropubs, also known as gastrolounges, typically serve high-end beer and food. The Pipe and Glass Inn does not fall short of this demand, as it serves nothing but the best quality and seasonal food. This has led to the restaurant claiming awards such as the 'Yorkshire Life dining pub of the year' in 2006/7, 'restaurant of the year' in 2007/2008, and one of thirty best gastropubs in the UK by Pub Chef magazine.

One of the greatest achievements of The Pipe and Glass Inn is its Michelin star status which was awarded in 2010 and retained in 2011. A “Michelin Star” is a hallmark of fine dining quality. The reason why such status is so desirable is because most restaurants never receive a Michelin star. In fact The Pipe and Glass Inn is just one of ten pubs that has been acclaimed with this position, and the first and only Michelin star awarded in East Yorkshire.

There are various menus available at The Pipe and Glass Inn varying from Evening, Vegetarian, Specials and even a 'Little Peoples' menu. This really shows the Inn's special efforts to cater for all.

The gastro pub also includes other facilities such as private dining, and overnight accommodation. First of all the dining rooms are exceptional and thus perfect for hosting events accommodating between six and twenty-eight people. The Hotham room offers a much more intimate dining experience with access to the grand Chef's library. This is a snug lounge that can be enjoyed with champagne and canapés. For larger events guests can make use of the Airy Conservatory which has splendid views of Dalton Park making it an extra special place.


The overnight accommodation is grand. The exquisite luxury boutique suites named 'Sage' and 'Thyme' make a perfect romantic break away or luxury retreat after dinner. They both feature super king-sized bed's, luxury bathrooms and private patio's.



The founders, James and Kate McKenzie, have thought of every little detail to ensure that guests are comfortable and experience nothing but luxury. These efforts are not only rewarded in the many awards received over the years, but the continued satisfaction of its guests.

http://www.pipeandglass.co.uk 
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2013-11-06
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