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The Niall Boylan Show
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New post: Do you have sympathy for the 14 immigrants that were found illegally entering Ireland?

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http://www.theniallboylanshow.com/podcasts/immigrants-refugees-kurdish-france-rosslare-illegal-brexit-ireland-uk-zappone/

14 immigrants were found in a refrigerated unit on a truck coming from France at the port of Rosslare. They are believed to be Kurdish and are now going through the refugee vetting process.

Is this the beginning of immigrants trying to get into the EU via Ireland as opposed to Britain following the beginning of BREXIT? Should they be returned to France where they came from or should we take our share of refugees into the country?

This got angry.

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New post: Should cyber bullying be a jail-able offence?

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http://www.theniallboylanshow.com/podcasts/boylan-4fm-podcast-bully-cyber-hughes-suicide-gardai/

Should cyber bullying be a jail-able offence?

The mother of a teenage victim of alleged cyber bullying says laws need to change to protect children from online predators.

Elaine Hughes lost her 17 year old son Darren Hughes Gibson to suicide on 23 August 2012.

Ms Hughes believes her son was bullied online due to the colour of his skin.

Following consideration of a substantial file containing 5,500 pages of online messages, the Director of Public Prosecution has directed that no charges will be brought.

Her son Darren was found dead at the Stephenstown Industrial Estate in Balbriggan, Co Dublin on 23 August, 2012.

He had been reported missing by his mother after he failed to return to the family’s former home at New Haven Bay in Balbriggan the previous night.

Coroner Dr Myra Cullinane set a date for a full hearing into the teen’s death, but Hughes said she wants a review of the DPP’s decision.

Elaine broke down in tears when she was informed of the court of the DPP’s decision not to bring charges.

I am going to speak to Elaine in a couple of minutes but tonight I want to know if you think cyber bullying should be a jailable offence.

We live in such a scary digital age now. I don’t know what it is like growing up as a teenager with such access to the internet and the lack of protection out there for young people.

I was bullied growing up but thankfully, when I went home the bulling didn’t follow me. Kids and teenagers these days have nowhere to turn anymore as the bullying now follows them home, in the form of their phones and laptops.

Some of these teenagers who are bullying people online may grow up to regret it but what in the mean time there is a possibility of them causing serious and irreversible damage.

Some people may argue that these teenagers don’t deserve to be jailed and punished for making a a childish mistake of calling someone names online. Not all bullying cases lead to the tragedy of a suicide but some do – which I personally think is the worrying thing about this and it shows the need for clear way to put a stop to it.

Would the possibility of prosecuting teenagers who engage in online bullying put a stop to it?

The primary statutes protecting individuals are the Non Fatal Offences Against the Person Act 1997 and the Offences Against the Person Act 1861. While these laws seem old and outdated, they are designed to both safeguard individuals from abuse and to provide appropriate sanctions to those who are found guilty.

Last year the Labour party put forward a bill to make cyber bullying and revenge porn a crime. The Bill proposes updating the existing definitions of communication and harassment so that acts such as cyberstalking, cyberbullying and dissemination of revenge porn can be codified into law.

Under the terms of the Bill anyone who causes another person harm or distress by persistently following, watching, pestering or communicating with or about them will be guilty of harassment and liable for a fine, a prison sentence of up to seven years or both.

Should this be rigorously enforced, even for teenagers?

I want to know what you think tonight –

Should cyber bullying be a jail-able offence?

Remember you can find more stories on the Niall Boylan Facebook and Twitter pages and remember #IrelandTalks4fm

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New post: Should cyber bullying be a jail-able offence?

Click Here to Listen

http://www.theniallboylanshow.com/podcasts/boylan-4fm-podcast-bully-cyber-hughes-suicide-gardai/

Should cyber bullying be a jail-able offence?

The mother of a teenage victim of alleged cyber bullying says laws need to change to protect children from online predators.

Elaine Hughes lost her 17 year old son Darren Hughes Gibson to suicide on 23 August 2012.

Ms Hughes believes her son was bullied online due to the colour of his skin.

Following consideration of a substantial file containing 5,500 pages of online messages, the Director of Public Prosecution has directed that no charges will be brought.

Her son Darren was found dead at the Stephenstown Industrial Estate in Balbriggan, Co Dublin on 23 August, 2012.

He had been reported missing by his mother after he failed to return to the family’s former home at New Haven Bay in Balbriggan the previous night.

Coroner Dr Myra Cullinane set a date for a full hearing into the teen’s death, but Hughes said she wants a review of the DPP’s decision.

Elaine broke down in tears when she was informed of the court of the DPP’s decision not to bring charges.

I am going to speak to Elaine in a couple of minutes but tonight I want to know if you think cyber bullying should be a jailable offence.

We live in such a scary digital age now. I don’t know what it is like growing up as a teenager with such access to the internet and the lack of protection out there for young people.

I was bullied growing up but thankfully, when I went home the bulling didn’t follow me. Kids and teenagers these days have nowhere to turn anymore as the bullying now follows them home, in the form of their phones and laptops.

Some of these teenagers who are bullying people online may grow up to regret it but what in the mean time there is a possibility of them causing serious and irreversible damage.

Some people may argue that these teenagers don’t deserve to be jailed and punished for making a a childish mistake of calling someone names online. Not all bullying cases lead to the tragedy of a suicide but some do – which I personally think is the worrying thing about this and it shows the need for clear way to put a stop to it.

Would the possibility of prosecuting teenagers who engage in online bullying put a stop to it?

The primary statutes protecting individuals are the Non Fatal Offences Against the Person Act 1997 and the Offences Against the Person Act 1861. While these laws seem old and outdated, they are designed to both safeguard individuals from abuse and to provide appropriate sanctions to those who are found guilty.

Last year the Labour party put forward a bill to make cyber bullying and revenge porn a crime. The Bill proposes updating the existing definitions of communication and harassment so that acts such as cyberstalking, cyberbullying and dissemination of revenge porn can be codified into law.

Under the terms of the Bill anyone who causes another person harm or distress by persistently following, watching, pestering or communicating with or about them will be guilty of harassment and liable for a fine, a prison sentence of up to seven years or both.

Should this be rigorously enforced, even for teenagers?

I want to know what you think tonight –

Should cyber bullying be a jail-able offence?

Remember you can find more stories on the Niall Boylan Facebook and Twitter pages and remember #IrelandTalks4fm

Late Night Talk Radio
Add a comment...

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New post: Should Conor McGregor apologise to road safety campaigners for his video of him recording a mobile phone video phone while driving?

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http://www.theniallboylanshow.com/podcasts/boylan-podcast-4fm-mcgregor-driving-criminal/

On Wednesday evening, Roseann Brennan spoke to The Niall Boylan Show on Classic Hits 4FM about why she believes UFC star Conor McGregor owes the families of road traffic accidents an apology.
Roseann Brennan is the mother of 6 year old Jake Brennan who was killed in 2014 when he was knocked down by a car in their housing estate.
The mother set up a group called 'Jake's Legacy' which was created in the hope of decreasing speed limits to 30km/h in residential areas.
Conor McGregor posted a video on his Instagram account of himself driving his car while recording a video on his mobile phone.
 



Driving out the compound these women are animals.
A post shared by Conor McGregor Official (@thenotoriousmma) on Jan 15, 2018 at 11:34am PST



The grieving mother told Classic Hits 4FM that the UFC star should apologise to victims of road traffic accidents and their families because she believes his behaviour is very irresponsible.
She told Niall Boylan that McGregor is taking away from the good work being done by herself and many organisations who are trying to reduce the amount of road accidents through awareness and legislation.
She believes he is a role model to many people and he must apologise for the video.
The heartbroken mother said;
"I call out Conor McGregor to publicly give an apology not to me but to the people that were seriously injured or killed on our roads" 
When Niall asked was Conor McGregor's video irresponsible, Roseann Brennan responded
"He (McGregor) is actually saying to them (his fans) it is cool to get in your car, drive, take a selfie and have no seat belt...this is undoing all our work trying to make our roads safe."
"He is being irresponsible and childish doing something that you'd expect of a teenager...I actually thought he was a clever man but I actually think he is stupid"
" Conor has so much of an influence, if he just used that he could do so much good being a proper role model...what is he playing at?"
Should Conor McGregor make a public apology to road safety campaigners for his video of him recording a video on his mobile phone while driving?
Remember you can find more stories on the Niall Boylan Facebook and Twitter pages and remember #IrelandTalks4fm

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New post: Would you be offended if a potential partner asked you to take an STI test?

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http://www.theniallboylanshow.com/podcasts/offended-partner-sti-test-sex-hiv-boylan-podcast-4fm/

Would you be offended if a potential partner asked you to take an STI test?

The popularity of dating apps may have led to an increase in the amount of sexually transmitted infections being reported in Ireland.

According to Dr. Ilona Duffy, sex education needs to be improved to decrease the prevalence of STIs in Irish society.

However, she has pointed to the emergence of STI clinics as one of the reasons behind the inflated figures.

She believes modern attitudes towards casual sex are one of the main contributing factors to the rise in infections.

She said "We're seeing the likes of Tinder, other websites where people are hooking up purely for sex and people, young people especially, don't have the same hang ups as they had years ago - worrying about pregnancy, worrying about STIs, worrying just about their reputation,".

She went on to say that “While it is fine to be on Tinder etc and meeting up people for casual sex - you've got to take precautions and I think that's not out there,"

Tonight I want to talk about the rise in STI’s in Ireland and the new age approach to casual sex.

Is casual sex a good thing or a bad thing in society?

Would you ask a potential partner to take a STI test before sleeping with them?

Or do you think it is offensive to assume that they may have an STI?

Put yourself in the situation – you are dating a guy or girl and you decide to take things to the next level. The woman or man you are dating whips out a home STI kit and asks you to do it – Would you be offended?

It would certainly be a mood killer but with the rise of STI’s in Ireland maybe it is necessary.

How would you react?

In 1995, just over 3,000 STIs were diagnosed; by 2013 it was 12,753, so is it time to change our attitude to testing?

A survey by insurer Aviva Health in 2013 found that 70 per cent of people surveyed had never had an STI test.

Tonight I want to know what you think –

Would you be offended if someone asked you to take an STI test?

Remember you can find more stories on the Niall Boylan Facebook and Twitter pages and remember #IrelandTalks4fm

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New post: Would you trust a 16 year old to be left at home alone for the weekend?

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http://www.theniallboylanshow.com/podcasts/boylan-4fm-podcast-teenager-home-vacation-holiday-alcohol-drugs/

Would you trust a 16 year old to be left at home alone for the weekend?

I want to ask you this because of a message we received from a listener.

Have a listen to it.

Hi Niall,

My husband and I have a predicament on our hands that I was wondering could you get me some advice on it. We have a 16 year old son. He is our only child. We are booking a weekend away and told our son about it. He told us that he doesn’t want to come with us and thinks he is too old to be going away with his parents.

He asked us can he stay home while we go and we are so unsure about what to do. He used to always come with us and I’ll be honest, I did notice him getting bored when he was away with us.

He is too old for a babysitter and said he doesn’t want to go stay with my sister. He wants us to trust him to stay at home by himself for the weekend.

My husband is more on the side of trusting him but I don’t think I can do it. We have left him in the house for a couple of hours if we are going to the local pub but we have never left him for a number of days alone.

He thinks he is old enough, I am not too sure.

Basically, I am hoping maybe a listener can offer some advice as they might have had this situation before themselves.

Is 16 old enough to be left in the house alone for a weekend?

What do you think of this message?

Do you think the mother is being overprotective? Or can you understand why this mother is concerned?

The thing that comes to my head when leaving a 16 year old boy alone in the house is will he have friends in the house? Will he get up to no good? Can you trust your child alone?

All children are different. Some may get up to no good whereas some may sit on their computer and be as good as gold.

Only a parent knows their child but even then – do we as parents really know what our child is capable of getting up to when we are not around. All children have secrets from their parents.

What should this mother do – should she let her 16 year old stay at home alone?

Is 16 old enough to be trusted?

I want to know what you think –

Would you let a 16 year old stay home alone for a weekend?

Remember you can find more stories on the Niall Boylan Facebook and Twitter pages and remember #IrelandTalks4fm

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New post: Should the Gardai be held to a higher standard of the law than civilians?

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http://www.theniallboylanshow.com/podcasts/gardai-law-civilians-drugs-conviction-boylan-4fm-podcast/

You may have seen in the papers the story of a female Garda who was caught in a Kildare nightclub taking a Class A drug just before Christmas. When she was confronted by the security staff of the club she admitted that had used the drugs and that her colleague – a fellow Garda - had dealt her the drugs.

 

No charges have officially been taken yet against the 2 Gardai but the story as I said, has been plastered all over the media. A source said last night: “This is shocking. Gardai are absolutely disgusted to hear that this happened. There are brave and courageous members putting themselves in danger every day of the week fighting drug gangs, there is a murderous feud in Dublin and the fact of the matter is cocaine sales in Ireland directly fund these gangs.”

 

The local Garda station has been praised for reacting so swiftly to deal with this incident. They are investigating the incident fully and all those concerned. It is understood when Gardai questioned the woman she identified herself as an officer stationed in the Midlands.

When questioned further she identified her dealer as a colleague. Gardai are understood to have immediately called senior officers to alert them to the situation and to enforce a plan to target the drug-dealing operation.

 

Many of us in the office said that as these 2 individuals’ members of the Gardai, they should be heavily covered by the media. Why – you may ask? Well people said that we are supposed to put our faith in the Gardai that they will arrest people who break the law – even more so when it comes to drugs that is a huge medical and gangland issue in Ireland.  The Gardai have to be a step above the law at all times and ensure that they lead by example and furthermore this duo who were caught should be made an example of by the media.

 

Many people on social media had a different opinion. One comment said “I’m glad to see that the Gardai are going to investigate this crime fully and through to a possible conviction. However It looks like the media has decided that these 2 Gardai are going to be sacrificial lambs. They should be treated like all citizens of the country and get their trial in court and not on the front pages of the newspapers like it’s already started.”

 

That’s an interesting point. At the end of the day the Gardai were off duty when then committed the alleged crime and I’m sure they were not the only people in Ireland that night who were caught using drugs but they were the only ones reported in the papers because of their profession.

 

So tonight I want to ask you – Should it matter what your profession is when it comes to being charged for crimes especially against drugs? Or should all people be treated the same by the law when it comes to investigations and prosecutions?

 

Remember you can find more stories on the Niall Boylan Facebook and Twitter pages and remember #IrelandTalks4fm

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New post: Should the voting age for referendum be reduced to 16?

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http://www.theniallboylanshow.com/podcasts/boylan-4fm-podcast-vote-age-ireland/

Should the voting age be lowered to 16 in Ireland?

The citizen’s assembly made a number of recommendations yesterday relating to the conduct of referendums.

To increase turnout in referendums, members recommended allowing early voting and holding ballots on weekend.

The assembly also recommended lowering the voting age to 16.

In Scotland, the voting age was reduced to 16 for the 2014 independence referendum and was since extended to the Scottish parliament and local elections.

But should we do the same here?

As it stands, a person must be 18 before they can register to vote. Many people believe that is the right age because it is when a person starts becoming an adult.

The argument for lowering the age is that referendums on issues affect the younger generation too and that it is unfair to not let their voices be heard.

However, some will argue that their age is exactly why they shouldn’t vote as they believe they are simply not mature enough to make changes to our legislation through voting.

I want to know what you think:

Should the voting age for referendum be reduced to 16?

Remember you can find more stories on the Niall Boylan Facebook and Twitter pages and remember #IrelandTalks4fm

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New post: Is President Donald Trump a racist?

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http://www.theniallboylanshow.com/podcasts/podcast-4fm-boylan-trump-racist-immigration-daca-haiti-afrioca/

Is President Donald Trump a racist?

President Donald Trump has insisted that he was “not a racist,” after his reported denunciation of immigration from “shithole” countries triggered a global firestorm of criticism.

Trump last week tweeted a convoluted denial about the comments, which were reported by The Washington Post and The New York Times and confirmed by Democratic Senator Dick Durbin, who attended the meeting at which they were said to have been spoken.

Trump told reporters, “I’m not a racist. I am the least racist person you have ever interviewed, that I can tell you,”

The alleged expletive came during a Thursday meeting between Trump and legislators about immigration reform.

After lawmakers raised the issue of protections for immigrants from African nations, Haiti and El Salvador, the president reportedly demanded to know why the United States should accept immigrants from “shithole countries,” rather than, for instance, wealthy and overwhelmingly white Norway.

Accounts suggest that when Mr Trump was told that the largest groups of immigrants with the status were from El Salvador, Honduras and Haiti, the president responded: "Haitians? Do we need more Haitians?"

The president tweeted on Friday morning that the language he used in the meeting was "tough" but disputed the wording of the reports.

He also posted another tweet denying he had insulted Haitians, accusing Democrats of making it up.

But Senator Dick Durbin stood by claims, and said that Mr Trump had used "hate-filled, vile and racist" language during the meeting.

The African Union on Friday demanded that the US president apologise expressing their "shock, dismay and outrage" at the "clearly racist" remarks.

The UN human rights spokesman, Rupert Colville, told a Geneva news briefing: "There is no other word one can use but racist. You cannot dismiss entire countries and continents as 'shitholes'."

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) accused the president of falling "deeper and deeper into the rabbit hole of racism and xenophobia".

Several Democratic representatives have said they intend to skip the president's State of the Union address later this month over the comments, accusing the president of racism.

Today I want to know if you think President Trump’s comments were racist.

The president has been accused of being racist in the past with some of his proposals like building walls to keep Mexicans out of America and also his travel ban from certain Middle Eastern countries.

Some people say that calling counties ‘shithole’s is not racist as a country is not a race.

However, disagree and think his comments are racist.

I want to know what you think –

So – do you think Trump is racist?

Remember you can find more stories on the Niall Boylan Facebook and Twitter pages and remember #IrelandTalks4fm

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New post: Do you think people are making themselves homeless to get a house?

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http://www.theniallboylanshow.com/podcasts/think-people-making-homeless-get-house/

Charity officials and opposition politicians have strongly criticised the outgoing chair of the Housing Agency over comments he made saying that families may be “gaming the system” by making themselves homeless in order to jump up the social housing waiting list.

Speaking to the Irish Times, Conor Skehan – who will finish up with his role this year after six years - suggested that the government may have “unwittingly created a problem by prioritising self-declared homelessness above all other types of housing need”.

Skehan referenced a measure – introduced in January 2015 – whereby 50% of all social housing allocations in Dublin were to go to homeless people.

This practice was discontinued in July 2016, due to fears that general applicants were being disadvantaged. Dublin City Council still prioritises homeless applicants, however.

Commenting on this measure, Skehan suggested that the prioritisation could be skewing homelessness figures.

“We unwittingly created a problem by prioritising self-declared homelessness above all other types of housing need, which created a distortion in the waiting list system and may have encouraged people to game the system,” he told the Irish Times.

He said that a way of gauging this was to look at if there was a change in the type of people presenting as homeless over the period that prioritisation has been in effect.

“If you were a social scientist analysing it, you might find people who had chaotic lives suddenly being displaced by people who had two or three kids and who have found a way of gaming the system,” said Skehan.

In the interview, Skehan also suggested that homelessness charities should be subject to “performance targets” to justify any state funding they receive. He also said that it was time to stop saying that homelessness can be ended.

The Housing Agency was set up in 2010 and plays a crucial role in addressing housing issues in the state.

Skehan has been strongly criticised for his comments, with homelessness experts and others saying that there was no evidence for the claims that families were “gaming the system”.

Sinn Féin TD Eoin Ó Broin “Conor Skeehan’s comments accusing some homeless families as ‘gaming the system’ are deeply hurtful to the thousands of people living in emergency accommodation,”

Ó Broin pointed towards an April 2016 report from the Housing Agency which examined the impact of the 50% social housing allocation and which failed to show any evidence to back up Skehan’s remarks.

Tonight I want to know if you think Conor Skehan should apologise for his comments.

Or do you agree with him?

Do you think people are making themselves homeless to get a house?

Remember you can find more stories on the Niall Boylan Facebook and Twitter pages and remember #IrelandTalks4fm

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