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The New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies
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The Lalo family from the village of Hotevilla on Third Mesa (Hopi Reservation, Arizona) will give an extended presentation on Hopi culture, farming, and art during this two-day event at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology. All four members of the Lalo family take part in their ceremonial duties at Hotevilla, continue to farm staple crops using the Hopi dry-farming method in the sand dunes and gardens below Third Mesa, and supplement their income by creating and marketing their artwork.

Raynard Lalo is an award-winning kachina carver who sells his work at the Heard Museum Fair and the Santa Fe Indian Market, Gene Lalo is also a kachina carver and has won awards at the Hopi Festival at the Museum of Northern Arizona, Dorleen Gashweseoma has won numerous awards for her woven wicker plaques, piki trays, and large willow peach baskets, and Valjean Lalo has earned several awards for his ceremonial clothing, including the very complex technique of diamond twill weaving.

On Saturday, May 20th the Lalo family will begin the weekend by demonstrating Hopi farming methods including a discussion of farming tools, field preparation, sowing seeds, maintenance of their fields, protection from pests and predators, and harvesting and processing their crops; participants will also be given the opportunity to try their hand at planting their own garden plot at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology. Event participants on May 20th will also be shown demonstrations on preparing and cooking somiviki, a traditional Hopi food made of either blue corn or wheat and used regularly for daily meals. On the following day, Sunday, May 21st, the Lalos will exhibit their work at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology; Dorleen will explain Hopi basketry, Raynard and Gene will demonstrate kachina carving, and Valjean will introduce Hopi weaving techniques. All of the artwork created by the Lalo family will be on display throughout the weekend and available for purchase.

Participants at this event will be treated to a catered meal on both Saturday and Sunday from The Feasting Place, owned and operated by Norma and Hutch Naranjo from Ohkay Owinge and Santa Clara Pueblo.

This event is an extremely unique opportunity for hands-on learning about traditional Hopi farming and artwork at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology. The cost of this event is $95 for one day and $150 for both days for FOA members, and $105 for one day and $165 for both days for non-FOA members. To reserve your place for this event, call (505) 982-7799, ext. 5 after 7am, starting Tuesday, April 11.

Please check back on the Office of Archaeological Studies' website (http://www.nmarchaeology.org/events/event-details.html?event_id=303) and the Museum of New Mexico Foundation's Friends of Archaeology website (http://www.museumfoundation.org/friends-archaeology) for updates.

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The Lalo family from the village of Hotevilla on Third Mesa (Hopi Reservation, Arizona) will give an extended presentation on Hopi culture, farming, and art during this two-day event at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology. All four members of the Lalo family take part in their ceremonial duties at Hotevilla, continue to farm staple crops using the Hopi dry-farming method in the sand dunes and gardens below Third Mesa, and supplement their income by creating and marketing their artwork.

Raynard Lalo is an award-winning kachina carver who sells his work at the Heard Museum Fair and the Santa Fe Indian Market, Gene Lalo is also a kachina carver and has won awards at the Hopi Festival at the Museum of Northern Arizona, Dorleen Gashweseoma has won numerous awards for her woven wicker plaques, piki trays, and large willow peach baskets, and Valjean Lalo has earned several awards for his ceremonial clothing, including the very complex technique of diamond twill weaving.

On Saturday, May 20th the Lalo family will begin the weekend by demonstrating Hopi farming methods including a discussion of farming tools, field preparation, sowing seeds, maintenance of their fields, protection from pests and predators, and harvesting and processing their crops; participants will also be given the opportunity to try their hand at planting their own garden plot at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology. Event participants on May 20th will also be shown demonstrations on preparing and cooking somiviki, a traditional Hopi food made of either blue corn or wheat and used regularly for daily meals. On the following day, Sunday, May 21st, the Lalos will exhibit their work at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology; Dorleen will explain Hopi basketry, Raynard and Gene will demonstrate kachina carving, and Valjean will introduce Hopi weaving techniques. All of the artwork created by the Lalo family will be on display throughout the weekend and available for purchase.

Participants at this event will be treated to a catered meal on both Saturday and Sunday from The Feasting Place, owned and operated by Norma and Hutch Naranjo from Ohkay Owinge and Santa Clara Pueblo.

This event is an extremely unique opportunity for hands-on learning about traditional Hopi farming and artwork at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology. The cost of this event is $95 for one day and $150 for both days for FOA members, and $105 for one day and $165 for both days for non-FOA members. To reserve your place for this event, call (505) 982-7799, ext. 5 after 7am, starting Tuesday, April 11.

Please check back on the Office of Archaeological Studies' website (http://www.nmarchaeology.org/events/event-details.html?event_id=303) and the Museum of New Mexico Foundation's Friends of Archaeology website (http://www.museumfoundation.org/friends-archaeology) for updates.
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The New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies is now on YouTube! Check out the New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies' YouTube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLJdJmLn3Pqe62_zHYzoDyw.

In this video installment of the "Maize: A Sacred Sustenance" series, Marlon Magdalena, from the Pueblo of Jemez, discusses the significance of corn in Pueblo culture. Marlon is an artist and instructional coordinator at Jemez State Historic Site and is also a passionate performer of Native American flute music.

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The New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies is now on YouTube! Check out the New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies' YouTube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLJdJmLn3Pqe62_zHYzoDyw.

In this episode of the "Maize: A Sacred Sustenance" video series, Norma and Hutch Naranjo of Ohkay Owinge and Santa Clara Pueblo, respectively, discuss corn's importance to Pueblo culture. In addition to being traditional farmers, Norma and Hutch own and operate a catering business called The Feasting Place. The Feasting Place is much more than a small business, it is an introduction to Pueblo culture through its most tangible offering: its unique and delicious cuisine.

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The New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies is now on YouTube! Check out the New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies' YouTube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLJdJmLn3Pqe62_zHYzoDyw.

Corn is just as important to Navajo culture as it is to Pueblo culture, however, it was incorporated into Navajo society much later. In this episode of "Maize: A Sacred Sustenance", Lenora Tsosie speaks about corn in Navajo culture and how the staple crop is critical to the life of a Navajo girl and its use is symbolic of her transition into womanhood.

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Join the New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies' International Archaeology Day event on Saturday, October 15th at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology.

The Office of Archaeological Studies, in collaboration with the Santa Fe Chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America, will host an open house at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology (7 Old Cochiti Road, Santa Fe, NM 87507) on Saturday, October 15, 2016 from 10 am to 4 pm. This is a free event, open to the public, and a great opportunity to tour the Center for New Mexico Archaeology, try your hand at the atlal and bow and arrow, and ask questions of archaeologists.

Download a PDF flyer for Archaeology Day at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology here: http://www.nmarchaeology.org/assets/images/pdf_files/2016%20Archaeology%20Day%20at%20the%20CNMA%20flyer.pdf.

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The New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies is now on YouTube! Check out the New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies' YouTube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLJdJmLn3Pqe62_zHYzoDyw.

In the fourth and final part of this four video series, archaeologist Lynette Etsitty shows us how to weave rabbit fur and yucca cordage into a wearable garment. The rabbit fur blanket was ubiquitous in the American Southwest up until very recently and is commonly found in prehistoric contexts as the primary cold weather clothing item.

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The New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies is now on YouTube! Check out the New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies' YouTube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLJdJmLn3Pqe62_zHYzoDyw.

In the third episode of this four part video series, archaeologist Lynette Etsitty demonstrates how to wrap wet rabbit fur around hand spun yucca fiber cordage. The wrapped rabbit fur "fabric" is the essential building block of the rabbit fur blanket and retains a tremendous amount of heat when woven into a full garment.

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The New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies is now on YouTube! Check out the New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies' YouTube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLJdJmLn3Pqe62_zHYzoDyw.

In the second video of this four part series, archaeologist Lynette Etsitty spins cleaned and separated yucca fiber into cordage. This cordage, a very thin rope, will be the basis upon which the rabbit fur blanket is woven. In order to weave this adult-sized blanket, Lynette had to spin several hundred feet of yucca fiber cordage.

Post has attachment
The New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies is now on YouTube! Check out the New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies' YouTube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLJdJmLn3Pqe62_zHYzoDyw.

In the first part of the four episode series on weaving a rabbit fur blanket, archaeologist Lynnette Etsitty demonstrates the first step in creating the cordage used to weave a rabbit fur blanket: cleaning and preparing yucca fiber. In this video Lynette shows us how to separate the thin fibers that make up yucca leaves by soaking the yucca in water. These thin fibers are the basic foundation in making yucca fiber cordage.
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