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The New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies
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More photos from the 2017 garden project at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology. This project was an extension of the Hopi Weekend event in May 2017. The seeds used for the garden project were heirloom varieties received from Pueblo villages around Santa Fe and from the Native Seeds/SEARCH (www.nativeseeds.org) seed bank in Tucson, Arizona. Pictured are both Cochiti blue corn and Hopi blue corn.
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2/15/18
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A group of photos of the 2017 garden project at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology. This project was an extension of the Hopi Weekend event in May 2017.
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2/15/18
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A selection of photos from the Hopi Weekend event at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology on May 20th and 21st, 2017. A group of 40 participants joined the Lalo family from Hotevilla, Arizona to learn about Hopi agriculture and lifeways.
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2/15/18
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"We Will Date Any Old Thing: Radiocarbon Dating at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology"

Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 12:00 noon, free!

The Low Energy Plasma Radiocarbon Sampling Laboratory is on the cutting edge of radiocarbon sampling. The ability to date extremely small amounts of organic materials through “gentle” surface oxidation has opened up a variety of dating applications difficult to address with conventional radiocarbon methods. These include the collection of stratigraphically-sequential samples from sooted rockshelter ceilings, the dating of oxalate layers both underlying and overlying rock art images, and the dating of residues from sherds. Although it did not stretch the lab’s capabilities, the recent sampling of a reputed Picasso canvas proved an interesting diversion from normal archaeological work.

The Brown Bag talk will take place at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology at 12:00 noon in the CNMA library. Seating is limited. Admission is free.

The Center for New Mexico Archaeology (7 Old Cochiti Road) is located off of Caja del Rio Road, across from Challenge New Mexico on the way to the Santa Fe Municipal Golf Course. Take 599 to South Meadows Road, continue through the traffic circle west along the Frontage Road to Caja del Rio Road. CNMA is on the left-hand side of the road and is the large building with white sail-like skylights on the roof.
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"Settlers and Consumers: Characterization of Tewa Pueblo Pottery from Late Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Sites"

Tuesday, February 13, 2018 at 12:00 noon, free!

C. Dean Wilson (former Director of the OAS' Ceramics laboratory and current OAS Research Associate) presents a lecture on the economic interaction between Tewa groups near Santa Fe and their non-Indian neighbors, beginning from the Spanish Colonial period and ending with Anglo-American residents of the northern Rio Grande region around the turn of the twentieth century.

Much of what is known about pottery produced by the Tewa and other Pueblo groups during the Late Colonial to Early Territorial periods is based on whole painted vessels found in museums and private collections. Recent studies of archaeological sherd assemblages from Northern Rio Grande Hispanic and Anglo sites occupied during this time span have provided the opportunity to characterize a broader range of pottery produced by Pueblo potters for use in non-Native households. These collections also document the nature and extent of interaction, influence, and trade between these groups.

The Brown Bag talk will take place at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology at 12:00 noon in the CNMA library. Seating is limited. Admission is free.

The Center for New Mexico Archaeology (7 Old Cochiti Road) is located off of Caja del Rio Road, across from Challenge New Mexico on the way to the Santa Fe Municipal Golf Course. Take 599 to South Meadows Road, continue through the traffic circle west along the Frontage Road to Caja del Rio Road. CNMA is on the left-hand side of the road and is the large building with white sail-like skylights on the roof.
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"Settlers and Consumers: Characterization of Tewa Pueblo Pottery from Late Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Sites"

On Tuesday, February 13th at noon, C. Dean Wilson (former Director of the OAS' Ceramics laboratory and current OAS Research Associate) presents a lecture on the economic interaction between Tewa groups near Santa Fe and their non-Indian neighbors, beginning from the Spanish Colonial period and ending with Anglo-American residents of the northern Rio Grande region around the turn of the twentieth century.

Much of what is known about pottery produced by the Tewa and other Pueblo groups during the Late Colonial to Early Territorial periods is based on whole painted vessels found in museums and private collections. Recent studies of archaeological sherd assemblages from Northern Rio Grande Hispanic and Anglo sites occupied during this time span have provided the opportunity to characterize a broader range of pottery produced by Pueblo potters for use in non-Native households. These collections also document the nature and extent of interaction, influence, and trade between these groups.

The Brown Bag talk will take place at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology at 12:00 noon in the CNMA library. Seating is limited. Admission is free.

The Center for New Mexico Archaeology (7 Old Cochiti Road) is located off of Caja del Rio Road, across from Challenge New Mexico on the way to the Santa Fe Municipal Golf Course. Take 599 to South Meadows Road, continue through the traffic circle west along the Frontage Road to Caja del Rio Road. CNMA is on the left-hand side of the road and is the large building with white sail-like skylights on the roof.
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On Thursday, August 17th, Hopi kachina carvers from the Third Mesa village of Hotevilla will be giving a day-long demonstration at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology highlighting their traditional methods of carving. The carvers will give presentations on the types of materials they use, the manner in which they collect their materials, how they work, and the symbolism and meaning behind their carvings. The presentation is free, however, seating is limited.

This is a full-day’s event dedicated entirely to kachina carving and guests are encouraged to watch and ask questions as these skilled artists create their one-of-a-kind art pieces. Each of the artists will be working from raw, unfinished cottonwood root at the beginning of the process and at the end of the day they will have completed pieces, entirely painted and decorated. This is a rare opportunity to see kachina carvers at work and for visitors to see the entire creative process unfold.

The carvers that are participating are Raynard Lalo (Spider Clan), Darance Chimerica (Fire Clan), and Eric Kayquaptewa (Spider Clan).

Raynard Lalo and Eric Kayquaptewa have both won numerous awards at prestigious art shows across the country for their traditional kachina carvings and are featured artists in the August 2017 issue of Native American Art magazine, the official magazine of the 2017 SWAIA Indian Market. Darance Chimerica is an award-winning traditional kachina carver and has traveled internationally to act as a representative of the Hopi Tribe to review museum collections and as a consultant for the proper care of their kachina carvings.

Please check back on the Office of Archaeological Studies' website (http://nmarchaeology.org/events/event-details.html?event_id=502) for updates.

The Center for New Mexico Archaeology (7 Old Cochiti Road) is located off of Caja del Rio Road, across from Challenge New Mexico on the way to the Santa Fe Municipal Golf Course. Take 599 to South Meadows Road, continue through the traffic circle west along the Frontage Road to Caja del Rio Road. CNMA is on the left-hand side of the road and is the large building with white sail-like skylights on the roof.
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The Lalo family from the village of Hotevilla on Third Mesa (Hopi Reservation, Arizona) will give an extended presentation on Hopi culture, farming, and art during this two-day event at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology. All four members of the Lalo family take part in their ceremonial duties at Hotevilla, continue to farm staple crops using the Hopi dry-farming method in the sand dunes and gardens below Third Mesa, and supplement their income by creating and marketing their artwork.

Raynard Lalo is an award-winning kachina carver who sells his work at the Heard Museum Fair and the Santa Fe Indian Market, Gene Lalo is also a kachina carver and has won awards at the Hopi Festival at the Museum of Northern Arizona, Dorleen Gashweseoma has won numerous awards for her woven wicker plaques, piki trays, and large willow peach baskets, and Valjean Lalo has earned several awards for his ceremonial clothing, including the very complex technique of diamond twill weaving.

On Saturday, May 20th the Lalo family will begin the weekend by demonstrating Hopi farming methods including a discussion of farming tools, field preparation, sowing seeds, maintenance of their fields, protection from pests and predators, and harvesting and processing their crops; participants will also be given the opportunity to try their hand at planting their own garden plot at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology. Event participants on May 20th will also be shown demonstrations on preparing and cooking somiviki, a traditional Hopi food made of either blue corn or wheat and used regularly for daily meals. On the following day, Sunday, May 21st, the Lalos will exhibit their work at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology; Dorleen will explain Hopi basketry, Raynard and Gene will demonstrate kachina carving, and Valjean will introduce Hopi weaving techniques. All of the artwork created by the Lalo family will be on display throughout the weekend and available for purchase.

Participants at this event will be treated to a catered meal on both Saturday and Sunday from The Feasting Place, owned and operated by Norma and Hutch Naranjo from Ohkay Owinge and Santa Clara Pueblo.

This event is an extremely unique opportunity for hands-on learning about traditional Hopi farming and artwork at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology. The cost of this event is $95 for one day and $150 for both days for FOA members, and $105 for one day and $165 for both days for non-FOA members. To reserve your place for this event, call (505) 982-7799, ext. 5 after 7am, starting Tuesday, April 11.

Please check back on the Office of Archaeological Studies' website (http://www.nmarchaeology.org/events/event-details.html?event_id=303) and the Museum of New Mexico Foundation's Friends of Archaeology website (http://www.museumfoundation.org/friends-archaeology) for updates.
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The Lalo family from the village of Hotevilla on Third Mesa (Hopi Reservation, Arizona) will give an extended presentation on Hopi culture, farming, and art during this two-day event at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology. All four members of the Lalo family take part in their ceremonial duties at Hotevilla, continue to farm staple crops using the Hopi dry-farming method in the sand dunes and gardens below Third Mesa, and supplement their income by creating and marketing their artwork.

Raynard Lalo is an award-winning kachina carver who sells his work at the Heard Museum Fair and the Santa Fe Indian Market, Gene Lalo is also a kachina carver and has won awards at the Hopi Festival at the Museum of Northern Arizona, Dorleen Gashweseoma has won numerous awards for her woven wicker plaques, piki trays, and large willow peach baskets, and Valjean Lalo has earned several awards for his ceremonial clothing, including the very complex technique of diamond twill weaving.

On Saturday, May 20th the Lalo family will begin the weekend by demonstrating Hopi farming methods including a discussion of farming tools, field preparation, sowing seeds, maintenance of their fields, protection from pests and predators, and harvesting and processing their crops; participants will also be given the opportunity to try their hand at planting their own garden plot at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology. Event participants on May 20th will also be shown demonstrations on preparing and cooking somiviki, a traditional Hopi food made of either blue corn or wheat and used regularly for daily meals. On the following day, Sunday, May 21st, the Lalos will exhibit their work at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology; Dorleen will explain Hopi basketry, Raynard and Gene will demonstrate kachina carving, and Valjean will introduce Hopi weaving techniques. All of the artwork created by the Lalo family will be on display throughout the weekend and available for purchase.

Participants at this event will be treated to a catered meal on both Saturday and Sunday from The Feasting Place, owned and operated by Norma and Hutch Naranjo from Ohkay Owinge and Santa Clara Pueblo.

This event is an extremely unique opportunity for hands-on learning about traditional Hopi farming and artwork at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology. The cost of this event is $95 for one day and $150 for both days for FOA members, and $105 for one day and $165 for both days for non-FOA members. To reserve your place for this event, call (505) 982-7799, ext. 5 after 7am, starting Tuesday, April 11.

Please check back on the Office of Archaeological Studies' website (http://www.nmarchaeology.org/events/event-details.html?event_id=303) and the Museum of New Mexico Foundation's Friends of Archaeology website (http://www.museumfoundation.org/friends-archaeology) for updates.
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