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A revolutionary force is now rising in North Korea from below: a new class of traders and merchants. Tomorrow at 9am GMT/6pm JST, Henry Tricks, The Economist's Tokyo bureau chief, will answer your queries about the country via twitter. To pose a question, comment below or use #askeconomist on twitter. For more info visit: http://econ.st/Xza1RZ
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Remarkable how capitalism can seep into even perhaps the most closed country in the world. I do personally believe that when people in North Korea get richer, they will definitely be more picky about their central government. The government may be able to appeal to the rich when only a small portion of its people are rich now. When the number of rich people in this country increases, however, the government will need to make bigger reforms to satisfy the need of the growing rich class. 
 
+Harry Watson or the country can make it impossible for the mass to become rich enough to be picky about thr government.
 
I can't remeber which gov't offical in N Korea who said this but there was the matter of the 'embarrassing' set of warehouses in Pyongyang which were actually emergency supermarkets setup by the regime to atleast mitigate the shortage in supplies at the capital. They said that they would remove them as soon as possible. I can see they're making good progress on that!
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North Korea is possibly the most evil government left on the planet. It does not speak well for China that they encourage this continued behavior. 
 
My earlier comment was to judgemental. During the peak of the Cold War many governments around the world were proxies for the major adversaries. The U.S. supported many evil governments under the guise of the enemy of my enemy.... Fortunately that era of international relations is coming to an end. My dissapointment with China's policy regarding North Korea is based on the new realities of international relations. Sure there are still many xenophobes but we all know China and the U.S. have a symbiotic yet competitive need for each other so China has no need to continue propping up such a reprehensibile regime.
 
Satisfying a rich class is governmental self satisfaction. The cost of convenience goes far beyond what is printed on your receipt. She stands guard over shelves full of poison.
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