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Thad Starner
Works at Google
Attended Massachusetts Institute of Technology
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Thad Starner
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$300,000 challenge to design and produce a wearable device to monitor blood alcohol levels in real time. 

http://www.challenge.gov/challenge/a-wearable-alcohol-biosensor/
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Thad Starner
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The cover article for National Geographic this month talks about my lab's work creating waterproof wearable computers and algorithms to help marine mammalogist Denise Herzing research two-way communication with wild Atlantic spotted dolphins.  Below is the on-line version of the article.

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2015/05/dolphin-intelligence/foer-text
When one of Earth's smartest creatures vocalizes, it fuels a heated debate among scientists: Are dolphins actually speaking a complex language?
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Mark Billinghurst's profile photo
 
Nice job Thad :)
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If you do this hack, please share - been wanting to do it myself and try our Passive Haptic Learning gloves on teaching steno.  In fact, I have a Steno machine and Plover in my lab already - and I have some friends who want to have a Twiddler version of stenotype for court reporting in the field.

On a steno machine, most fingers control 2 buttons which can be pressed individually or chorded.  On the Twiddler, emulating this is easy using its 3 buttons per finger:  use left for top, right for bottom, and middle for both.

The thumbs also control 2 buttons that may be chorded.  Dealing with the thumbs on the Twiddler is even easier than the fingers.   Just use Ctl and Shift (and both together) on one Twiddler for the A and O keys for steno and use Ctl and Shift on the other Twiddler for E and U.

Now comes the trouble.  Both the index finger and the little finger on the right hand are responsible for 4 keys, including chords of them.  Fortunately, we still have the Num and Alt keys on both thumbs left.   Thus, we could do Num, Alt, Num+Alt, and even Alt+Ctl for each thumb.  Unfortunately, the thumb is usually busy with the vowels when doing Steno.  Yet, from my limited use of steno, only ONE thumb is usually being used.  Even more good news - those extra keys controlled by the right index finger and right little finger are rarely used. 

SOOOoooo....can we slightly modify normal steno to work on two twiddlers by using the extra thumb keys?  My guess is yes.  I just haven't gotten around to trying it yet.

As a final note, there might be an easier way to fix the problem.  The Twiddler3 has mouse buttons above the index finger.  I am physically capable of hitting both the letter key and the mouse key at the same time.  That might given enough expressiveness to handle the two 4-key fingers - I haven't gotten far enough into the advanced steno lessons to know for sure yet.  I also don't know if the Twiddler3 configurator has the ability to redefine the mouse keys as chording letter keys (+Tony Havelka ?).

OK....back to ISWC paper editing.  Deadline is today.
 
Does anyone know if it's possible to configure a Twiddler3 to act like an NKRO keyboard? 

My crazy thought: two Twiddler3s, change the keymap to something steno-like and use Plover. This would give lightweight, wireless steno input. 

CC +Tony Havelka +Mirabai Knight 
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Thad Starner's profile photoTony Havelka's profile photoBrian Dorsey's profile photoAlex Bravo's profile photo
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You don't need to send anything to OS. You only need one steno application - Plover. All you need is to write another keyboard module for Plover. Plover exists on all platforms AFAIK, except maybe iOS. It's all open source too. The timing might be the biggest issue. 
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Mike Elgan gets it more right than any of the other articles I've seen. 

http://www.computerworld.com/article/2905974/three-lies-about-google-glass.html
The conventional wisdom about Google's experimental smart glasses project is all wrong. Here's why.
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Thad Starner's profile photoRussell Nelson's profile photoChro mosone's profile photoSean Sill's profile photo
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Is it possible to get one anymore without resorting to amazon or ebay? I'm feeling the lack of hud.
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A Wearable User’s Dashboard and Turn Signals

Walking with a wearable computer should be more like driving a car. With a car, much of my attention is dedicated to the environment around me: looking for pedestrians, watching for stop signs, and staying in my lane.  Occasionally, when everything looks clear, I might look at the speedometer, fuel gauge, or radio station displayed on the dashboard. These displays are arranged and designed so that I can monitor the car’s state with a glance.  Yet the displays don’t intrude-I determine when and how often I look at them.

I’d like the equivalent of my car’s dashboard and turn signals for my wearable. The system should give me constant, useful (and usable) information that I can refer to when I want and that enables me to do the most common tasks simply. In some senses, a wristwatch already serves as a sort of wearable dashboard. While walking down the street, I can check to see if the area immediately before me is clear, turn my wrist, refocus my eyes, check the time, and then refocus my eyes on the world in front of me. The entire process takes approximately two seconds, and I haven’t gone further than I had already determined was safe to walk without looking.  A head-up display can provide more advantages than a wristwatch. I can set the HUD’s physical focus to the depth of my focus. This focus matching eliminates the time required for my eye to refocus between the environment and the display. In addition, a HUD requires less eye and arm movement than a watch.  Of course, a HUD also provides a higher-resolution image than a wristwatch can effectively display.  An interesting question is, what sort of information might be useful for fast access during a user’s daily tasks? What should be on the dashboard of everyday life? How should the data be displayed so as to be both useful and understandable at a glance? Depending on the user, we could imagine displays of calories burned while walking, time until the next meeting, top to-do list items, email status, or even a Google Earth-style view of the user’s surroundings.

Martin Frey, an interface designer in Munich, has combined several of these concepts to create the Just In Time Watch (www.freymartin.de/en/projects/jitwatch). The JIT-Watch helps its user get to appointments on time by providing a visualization of the time and distance to the appointment location. First, the system accesses the user’s calendar to determine the appointment time and location. By using the Web-based travel and traffic information, it estimates the times when the user should arrive at certain checkpoints, such as a bus stop or subway station. Through GPS, the JITWatch tracks its user’s progress and visualizes the user’s current location versus an on-time travel rate on a completion bar. The watch achieves much of this functionality through Bluetooth connections to sensors and a mobile-phone ٞInternet connection carried elsewhere on the body. Like a car’s dashboard, the JIT-Watch combines relatively complex data into a meaningful and immediately understandable display, letting the user determine his progress with a glance whenever he has a spare second.

We could extend the JITWatch so that when its wearer is running late, she could compose an email or SMS to the other people at the upcoming appointment and give them an updated arrival time. We often use mobile messaging and mobile phones for such microcoordination already. However, by understanding the user's context, devices such as the JITWatch could significantly reduce the user’s burden in signaling his intentions to others. The display could suggest predetermined messages ("I'm coming," "I'll be there shortly," "Where are you?"), and the user could dispatch the message by confirming it with a flick of the wrist (sensed by accelerometers in the wristwatch).

This scenario reveals another goal for wearable computer interfaces that parallels current automobile interfaces: simplicity and low effort in the use of commonly used communication devices. In the automobile, some actions (such as braking) automatically generate signals (brake lights) for others to see. Other common signal interfaces such as turning are designed so that they can be performed with the minimum amount of additional motion and attention.  One obvious question then is, what actions do we most often want to perform while moving -that is, what’s the equivalent of the driver’s need for turn signals? Microcoordination seems one potential application, but many are possible. Perhaps a user, while walking, might make a gesture to trigger the reading of an email. Other gestures could speed or slow playback or skip to other messages.

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From 2002-2007 I wrote a series of essays for Pervasive Computing magazine on wearable computing.  The excerpt above is from the last in 2007 and was requested by +Alex Bravo .  Alex's timing is fortuitous - I just read the Wired essay on the Apple Watch

http://www.wired.com/2015/04/the-apple-watch/

in which Apple designers are quoted discussing many of the same concepts and much of the same language as in these essays.  Over the next few weeks, I hope to revisit the essays here, preparing for the class Mark Billinghurst and I are teaching at CHI2015 called "C20 The Glass Class: Designing Wearable Interfaces"

http://chi2015.acm.org/program/courses/

I'm hoping y'all will help me iterate on and improve these essays by commenting here.  For the full essay, see

http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/login.jsp?tp=&arnumber=4160599&url=http%3A%2F%2Fieeexplore.ieee.org%2Fxpls%2Fabs_all.jsp%3Farnumber%3D4160599
The inside story of the Apple Watch: the people who made it, why it's important, and just how much the world's largest company has riding on it.
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Alex Bravo's profile photoJennifer Edeburn's profile photo
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This is why I prefer audible backup sensors to in-dash rearview cameras.  They keep me from having to choose whether I am visually monitoring the front or the back, because I can do both at once.
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Who would pay US$3995 ($8,986 today) to own a early prototype of a consumer device that could only be used for 30 minutes?  I don't know, but someone did this week, March 1984, 31 years ago.    Seems ludicrous, except that  the device was the Motorola DynaTAC 8000X, the first commercially available cellular phone.  That day, some unknown consumer started living in the future, as today there are billions of users.

The wearable computing devices we see today are making similar history.  Some are already wildly successful - even if they are going unremarked.  The LG Tone Pro-style around-the-neck bluetooth stereo headphones are on several best seller lists on Amazon, and I rarely walk around in public without seeing a pair.  Other, more experimental devices like Google Glass have shown that the public "gets it," even if the price tag is more like that of the $9000 DynaTAC than the Diamond Rio (the first commercially successful wearable MP3 player, sold at $291 in today's money).   With numerous technological pieces finally falling into place to make wearables feasible for business and consumers (not the least of which, widespread deployment of low power Bluetooth and low latency cellular networks), I expect to see a wave of products, some of which will really change our lives in the next decade.

As many of you know, this journey has been very personal for me and various teams of enthusiasts.   This year is the 25th since I started trying to make a wearable computer that I could use in my everyday life - for note taking, augmented memory, music, navigation, messaging, health/fitness, augmented reality, social collectives, and basically everything people do on a laptop or smart phone these days.  During that time, two thoughts have really inspired me:

1) "Time makes more converts than reason."  Thomas Paine

and

2) The best way to invent the future is to live in it (with nods to Alan Kay, Abraham Lincoln, and my colleague Gregory Abowd)

Here's to hoping that soon more people will be inventing the future with us by wearing it.
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Richard DeVaul's profile photoNoble Ackerson's profile photoBoris Valdez's profile photoDavid Murphy's profile photo
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+Joshua Marinacci
About BT LE:  It should still be lower IMO.  Phil Carvey showed 2-3nJ/bit back in 1996 (http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/login.jsp?tp=&arnumber=526877&url=http%3A%2F%2Fieeexplore.ieee.org%2Fxpls%2Fabs_all.jsp%3Farnumber%3D526877)   Unfortunately, when BT was first being made, it was thought of as a replacement for RS232 on desktops....I was told the managers of the project did not believe it was going to be for cellular phones - which is what we were encouraging as part of the 802.15 standard.  I can't believe it has taken this long to even get to BT LE!
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Deadline has been extended for the IEEE Computer Special Issue on Wearable Computers.  See

http://www.computer.org/portal/web/computingnow/cocfp6
Wearable Computing. Full Paper Submissions Due: 5 January 2015. Publication date: June 2015. Computer seeks submissions for the June 2015 special issue on wearable computing. Wearable computing technology involves usability, interface design, human–computer interaction, context sensing, ...
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Thad Starner
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Looks like the Recon Jet is available now.  +Gil Zhaiek  says the back-orders are being filled, but current sales have a 4-6 week wait according to Recon's order form.  I like Recon's approach and want to get my hands on a Jet to see the interaction.  Now, if they can just come out with a dive mask with a developer's interface so I can use it for my dolphin research, I'd be very happy!

http://www.theverge.com/2015/4/16/8422111/recon-jet-smart-glasses-sports-google-glass
While shooting in Park City last December for our Top Shelf episode on winter tech, I finally got to test a product I'd waited years to try: ski goggles with a heads-up display. The technology was...
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I had a chance to talk to a reporter for Motherboard (Vice magazine) on how wearable tech should have more of a democratizing effect than one of increasing disparity.  See what you think!

http://motherboard.vice.com/read/the-inherent-inequality-of-biohacking
What happens when not everyone can afford a hacked body?
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Kathi Browne's profile photoThad Starner's profile photo
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+Kathi Browne
OK.  But its not going to be like what you think:

"Recognizing Sign Language from Brain Imaging"
http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.362.4602&rep=rep1&type=pdf
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Submission deadline for ISWC Wearable Computing conference now April 17! ISWC.net
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Wifi Wearable Woes:  Have a wearable device on 802.11 that seems to have slow network connection or drops all the time?  The reason might be that the Wifi router allows 11Mbps (802.11b) connections, which causes everything to slow down to that speed.  Even if a device starts at 54Mbps, as it wanders to the fringes of a given router's range, it might move to 11Mbps (instead of finding the next router for a connection).  Now the device is using high power AND causing everything to slow down.  As an extra detriment, it may start dropping connections.

Solution: turn off 11Mbps (802.11b) compatibility on the router.    

For more information:

http://www.networkworld.com/article/2230601/cisco-subnet/dropping-legacy-802-11-support-from-your-infrastructure--part-2-.html

http://blogs.cisco.com/wireless/bring-out-yer-dead-5-steps-to-eliminate-802-11b-from-your-networks

http://blogs.cisco.com/wireless/wi-fi-taxes-digging-into-the-802-11b-penalty

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11n-2009

(Thanks to Greg Priest-Dorman and Robert Watson for making me aware of how common this Wifi problem is!)
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+Greg Priest-Dorman
the day after you told me about  this problem, Robert called me asking about similar symptoms!  I figure we needed to make the community aware.
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As we say goodbye to the Glass project at Google X labs, we can look forward to seeing the first versions of Google Glass, the consumer electronics product.
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Tony Havelka's profile photoTrish Whetzel's profile photoPaulo Edson (P4ulo 3dson)'s profile photoSir Charles's profile photo
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I love how the best selling wearable monocular in history is considered, by the press, to be a failure.  Glass puts Google "in the game" in a big way.  They now know what works and what doesn't. They know where to look for advancements.  They know what is important and what is just noise. The have interested, highly qualified people seeking them out to help further this concept along.  They could not be in a better position to springboard to Glass 2.0.
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Have him in circles
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RealFranck Vernelus's profile photo
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Education
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology
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Story
Tagline
Creating intelligent interfaces through wearable computing, first person sensing, and pattern discovery
Introduction
I am a Technical Lead/Manager on Glass and a Professor of Computing at Georgia Tech.  Besides Glass, my projects include a glove that teaches the wearer how to play piano melodies without active attention, detecting sign language from brain signals, two way communication experiments with dolphins, and a computer vision based sign language recognizer that helps young deaf children acquire language skills.
Bragging rights
I am a founder of the field of wearable computing and coined the term "augmented reality" in 1990 to describe the interfaces I was building. For over 20 years I have worn a head-up display based computer in my everyday life as an intelligent assistant, the longest such experience known.
Work
Occupation
Professor/researcher on wearable computing and pattern recognition
Skills
activity discovery, pattern recognition and machine learning, gesture recognition, rapid prototyping, user studies, some American Sign Language, table tennis
Employment
  • Google
    Technical Lead/Manager, 2010 - present
    Making Glass usable and useful.
  • Georgia Institute of Technology
    Professor, 1999 - present
    Research and teaching.
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Double cheddar style burger and onion rings very good. Shakes are very thick. A lot of food for little $. Clean and new. These folks are trying, and it shows. Cookout has a drive through, but the burgers seem cooked to order. If they can keep this quality of experience going, Cookout will be my preferred fast food place around Georgia Tech.
Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago
Lasagne with wine soaked onions was a good dish. Suckling pig was OK; bonus points for having it available. Onion soup a little disappointing. Lovely ambiance. Service was good. Good wine list. A bit better than the average 4 star I give. Worth a stop.
Public - 4 months ago
reviewed 4 months ago
Smoked salmon risotto was my favorite dish in two weeks in Italy! Very rich. Actually perhaps my favorite dish in a year. My wife had the vongole (spaghetti with clams) which was also very good. My mother's amatriciana (red sauce with pancetta and red chilies) was certainly good, but not the level of the other dishes. Family restaurant with buffet of appetizers. Simple decor. Goods selection of wines.
Public - 4 months ago
reviewed 4 months ago
pistachio pasta is excellent. 3 pasta special provides a good contrast in tastes. when we were there in winter there was several dishes not available, but still a good selection of tasty food for a tourist mountain spot.
Public - 4 months ago
reviewed 4 months ago
25 reviews
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Sign on the door says "Caffetteria Tavola Calda Pizzeria Gastronomical." Good for a quick bite: slices of pizza, arroncini (fried rice balls with filling), hot dogs in pastry (tried - pretty good for its genre). A better idea, though, is the sit down service where there is much more variety. I had a fried chicken cutlet and fries. With some salt and lemon, it was pretty tasty. Omelette with ham and cheese was good as well. Very helpful staff and fast service. The meatballs and rolled beef looks like a good choice. Fast turn over. A good quick option on the way to the Vatican museums.
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Public - 4 months ago
reviewed 4 months ago
The service is a well oiled machine, which is rare next to tourist destinations in Europe. extensive menu, executed well. Open all day. Food is a step above. Garlic is a staple. Good for drinks or a gorge fest. staff cares and takes pride in their work. update: ate here for a third time. changing daily specials. recommend the veal in Gorgonzola if they have it (small portion by American standards but tasty). bresaola and rocket salad is tasty. ham and Gorgonzola pizza is good too. good cheese plates and amazing chocolate gelato for dessert. try a bottle of Camenere wine from Veneto. they cook an artichoke until you can eat the whole thing. my party of 4 keeps eating more than we intended. Good consistent stop with a big enough menu that we didn't bother looking for alternatives.
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Public - 4 months ago
reviewed 4 months ago
Inexpensive for a fine dining experience and something I'd be happy to do again. The restaurant features fish, but I had a balsamic steak that was very tasty. It comes thin and well done, but even as a rare meat eater I very much enjoyed it. Two of us had the swordfish, which is thin, seasoned well, and enjoyable, but a touch overdone. One highlight was the house white wine - produced by the owner and named after the his mother. We had to have two bottles! Lots of small tasty extras make you feel welcome. My wife enjoyed the deconstructed cannoli for dessert. I intend to order more dishes in the future to get a better idea of their menu.
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Public - 4 months ago
reviewed 4 months ago