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Thad Starner
Works at Google
Attended Massachusetts Institute of Technology
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Thad Starner

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"On You: A Story of Wearable Computing" is opening at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA this week
(http://www.computerhistory.org/visit/)

Clint Zeagler and I are setting it up today.  The exhibit shows why devices like Glass, Fitbit, LG Tone Pro, and Vuzix M100 were not possible until recently due to challenges in power, networking, mobile input, and display.  We have approximately 50 head-mounted displays as part of the exhibit.

Here is a preview:
https://www.google.com/culturalinstitute/exhibit/wearable-computing/gQuZsQUI?hl=en-GB
Spend a day at the Computer History Museum. Find out why computer history is 2000 years old. Learn about computer history´s game-changers in our multimedia exhibitions. Play a game of Pong or Spacewar! Listen to computer pioneers tell their story from their own perspective.
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"On You: A Story of Wearable Computing" is opening at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA this week
(http://www.computerhistory.org/visit/)

Clint Zeagler and I are setting it up today.  The exhibit shows why devices like Glass, Fitbit, LG Tone Pro, and Vuzix M100 were not possible until recently due to challenges in power, networking, mobile input, and display.  We have approximately 50 head-mounted displays as part of the exhibit.

Here is a preview:
https://www.google.com/culturalinstitute/exhibit/wearable-computing/gQuZsQUI?hl=en-GB
Spend a day at the Computer History Museum. Find out why computer history is 2000 years old. Learn about computer history´s game-changers in our multimedia exhibitions. Play a game of Pong or Spacewar! Listen to computer pioneers tell their story from their own perspective.
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UbiComp/ISWC Doctoral School -- Announcement and Call for Papers

*Important Dates*
June 19th @ 11:59pm PDT: Submission deadline
June 26th: Notification of acceptance
July 3rd @ 11:59pm PDT: Camera-ready version of extended abstracts
September 7th/8th: Doctoral school

    http://www.ubicomp.org | http://iswc.net/iswc15/     September 7-8, 2015, Osaka, Japan

The UbiComp/ISWC Organizing Committee is excited to announce the joint
UbiComp and ISWC 2015 Doctoral School, which continues the successful
Doctoral Colloquium event to offer a more in-depth and comprehensive
experience to PhD students at different stages in their PhD research.

The Doctoral School (DS) will provide a friendly, supportive, and
constructive forum in which PhD students can learn about research and
methods from internationally recognized leaders in the community and present
their research-in-progress to get feedback from peers and experts in the
field. The DS offers PhD students the valuable opportunity to engage in
in-depth discussion on their work and gain exposure to a variety of
perspectives that can help to strengthen and shape their work as they
progress towards their degrees.

*Target Participants*

The Doctoral School welcomes applications from candidates who are 1-2
years away from their PhDs. However, junior PhD students are welcome to
apply if they have already selected a topic they would like to pursue for
their thesis work and have some initial results. Applicants should be far
enough into their PhDs to have identified the salient issues and appropriate
research methodology, as well as achieved some results. The research
questions and proposed contributions of the dissertation research should be
defined. Preference will be given to applicants who are at a stage where a
substantial portion of the research has been completed but are still far
enough from completion that feedback received at the DS can influence the
remaining research.

Applicants accepted to the DS will be required to give a presentation on
their PhD research during the DS. DS student participants will be offered
free registration for UbiComp / ISWC 2015 for both the Doctoral School and
the main UbiComp / ISWC 2015 conferences. DS student participants will be
eligible to apply for student travel grants.


*Submission*

Student submissions should be 4-6 pages long and comply with the SIGCHI
Extended Abstract template. Accepted submissions will be included in the ACM
Digital Library as extended abstracts. Furthermore, students will be invited
to present during the joint UbiComp and ISWC poster session.

Applications should be submitted as a PDF file to either of the following
email addresses: doctoral.school2014@ubicomp.org and
doctoralschool2015@iswc.net

Submissions will be reviewed by the Chairs and an expert committee.
Interested applicants who are not sure whether to apply are encouraged to
consult with the Chairs prior to applying.


*Important dates*

June 19th @ 11:59pm PDT: Submission deadline
June 26th: Notification of acceptance
July 3rd @ 11:59pm PDT: Camera-ready version of extended abstracts
September 7th/8th: Doctoral school


*Doctoral School Chairs*

Nicholas D. Lane, Bell Labs, UK
Youngki Lee, School of Information Systems Singapore Management
University, SG

doctoral.school2014@ubicomp.org| doctoralschool2015@iswc.net
The 2015 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing (UbiComp 2015) will be held at Grand Front Osaka in Umeda, Osaka, Japan from Sep. 7-11, colocated with ISWC 2015. UbiComp 2015 will again be multi-track and we aim to include a broad multidisciplinary program, ...
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Ivan Poupyrev discusses the expressivity of different body parts for interaction with a focus on wearables at Google I/O.

elbow: 10 bits/sec
wrist: 23 bits/sec
hand: 38 bits/sec per finger

https://youtu.be/mpbWQbkl8_g
11:03
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Twiddler without a Twiddler? Could it be possible? 
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The ISWC Program Committee meeting was Tuesday at Google, and the announcements of which papers were accepted were sent to the authors.  Lots of new stuff and new people, so it looks like it will be a fun program! 

For those academically minded nerds, the wearables conference had 30% more submissions this year than last year, and the acceptance rate for full papers was 19% with an overall acceptance rate of 32% 

Hope to see folks in Osaka, Japan September 7-11!

http://iswc.net
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$300,000 challenge to design and produce a wearable device to monitor blood alcohol levels in real time. 

http://www.challenge.gov/challenge/a-wearable-alcohol-biosensor/
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Looks like the Recon Jet is available now.  +Gil Zhaiek  says the back-orders are being filled, but current sales have a 4-6 week wait according to Recon's order form.  I like Recon's approach and want to get my hands on a Jet to see the interaction.  Now, if they can just come out with a dive mask with a developer's interface so I can use it for my dolphin research, I'd be very happy!

http://www.theverge.com/2015/4/16/8422111/recon-jet-smart-glasses-sports-google-glass
While shooting in Park City last December for our Top Shelf episode on winter tech, I finally got to test a product I'd waited years to try: ski goggles with a heads-up display. The technology was...
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The IEEE Computer magazine special issue (June) on wearable computers came out.  Tom Martin and I are guest editors!

http://www.computer.org/web/computingnow/computer

Our introduction is available freely here:

http://www.computer.org/csdl/mags/co/2015/06/mco2015060012.html

The editor (Carrie Walsh) did a nice job making us sound more eloquent than we are.  I would appreciate any feedback - we continue to refine our prose for placing wearables in the context of the history of computing.
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Project Jacquard (Google I/O):  Conductive thread 0.1 ohm/meter in many colors!

https://youtu.be/mpbWQbkl8_g
26:26
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Funny video that is great for showing the contrast between interactions possible with Glass vs. those with a VR HMD.

https://youtu.be/FN78c5npKfg
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Call for Participation

Wear and Tear: Constructing Wearable Technology for the Real World

ISWC'15, Workshop September 7th and 8th, 2015, Osaka, Japan
____________________________________________________

http://wcc.gatech.edu/wearandtear
____________________________________________________

Creating wearable devices for real world harsh environments is a
significant challenge to research projects. Often in the pursuit of
academic papers we lose the hands-on experience we develop while
building the actual hardware. In the pursuit of reaching our goals we
put aside the construction and prototyping lessons learned while
getting there. Typically the devices we build are secondary to the
research performed, but the skills are common to many ubiquitous and
wearable computing projects.

There are not many venues to publish these experiences. DIY builder
venues may not appreciate our narrowly focused requirements, while
academic publication is not usually appropriate for these engineering
efforts, often only having room for a short description of the final
version of the test setup. Ruggedizing equipment for use with animals,
or waterproofing computers for underwater experiments might have taken
up most of the research time, but can often get the least space in a
paper.

September 7th: Workshop

In this workshop we will have the opportunity to talk about how we
built our devices, systems, and test setups. What did we create in
order to perform the study? What did and didn't work? Who made the
part that finally met the requirements? What combination of hardware
from different sources made the difference?

A small sampling of the types of questions that we would love to see
addressed include:


・ How can you seal a wearable computer against submersion in water? For months?

・ What connectors stand up to the movements of an animal?

・ What harsh environment standards exist?

・ What flexible materials can you bite repeatedly?

・ What processes can mitigate industrial oil film on a camera lens?

・ How do you clean these devices?

・ What 3D printer technology is appropriate for building cases?

・ How do you radiation-harden consumer-grade electronic parts?

This is the engineer's opportunity for show and tell. Bring your
hardware, bring your horror stories, and brag on your sources. Tell us
about the approaches that failed and why. Share your insights and help
the community create new devices. Tell us about processes and
procedures. Describe your failures and then the ultimate successes.
Teach us how to build.

Topics we will cover include:

・ Harsh environments including underwater, extreme temperatures, and
high radiation.

・ Unappreciative users such as dogs, cats, horses, birds, land crabs,
and even human luddites.

・ Custom enclosures approaches including rapid prototyped, machined,
special surface treatments.

・ Hardened electronics including surface coatings and sealants,
avoiding vulnerable components, temperature, and radiation.

・ Communication, connectors, and cables. What protocols fail in the
presence of noise? What signals work in particular transmission
mediums?

・ Testing in the field. Preparation, logistics, test site
accessibility, transportation, networking.

・ Cloth and fabrics. How can textile interfaces be hardened for harsh
environments?

・ Unforgiving requirements such as international space station rules
and long lifecycle devices.


Submissions should not be structured like a typical academic paper. We
are looking for engineering how-to articles more at home in Make
magazine than an ACM publication. Give us specific vendors and part
numbers. Tell us the details.  Accepted papers must be in the SIGCHI
Extended Abstract format. Submit your presentations and questions to
wearandtear@wcc.gatech.edu by June 10, 2015.  See
http://wcc.gatech.edu/wearandtear for more details.
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The cover article for National Geographic this month talks about my lab's work creating waterproof wearable computers and algorithms to help marine mammalogist Denise Herzing research two-way communication with wild Atlantic spotted dolphins.  Below is the on-line version of the article.

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2015/05/dolphin-intelligence/foer-text
When one of Earth's smartest creatures vocalizes, it fuels a heated debate among scientists: Are dolphins actually speaking a complex language?
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Nice job Thad :)
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Education
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Links
Story
Tagline
Creating intelligent interfaces through wearable computing, first person sensing, and pattern discovery
Introduction
I am a Technical Lead/Manager on Glass and a Professor of Computing at Georgia Tech.  Besides Glass, my projects include a glove that teaches the wearer how to play piano melodies without active attention, detecting sign language from brain signals, two way communication experiments with dolphins, and a computer vision based sign language recognizer that helps young deaf children acquire language skills.
Bragging rights
I am a founder of the field of wearable computing and coined the term "augmented reality" in 1990 to describe the interfaces I was building. For over 20 years I have worn a head-up display based computer in my everyday life as an intelligent assistant, the longest such experience known.
Work
Occupation
Professor/researcher on wearable computing and pattern recognition
Skills
activity discovery, pattern recognition and machine learning, gesture recognition, rapid prototyping, user studies, some American Sign Language, table tennis
Employment
  • Google
    Technical Lead/Manager, 2010 - present
    Making Glass usable and useful.
  • Georgia Institute of Technology
    Professor, 1999 - present
    Research and teaching.
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Stay here every chance we get. A must stop for any train buff or foodie.
Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
My favorite late night place in York!
Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
Lasagne with wine soaked onions was a good dish. Suckling pig was OK; bonus points for having it available. Onion soup a little disappointing. Lovely ambiance. Service was good. Good wine list. A bit better than the average 4 star I give. Worth a stop.
Public - 6 months ago
reviewed 6 months ago
Smoked salmon risotto was my favorite dish in two weeks in Italy! Very rich. Actually perhaps my favorite dish in a year. My wife had the vongole (spaghetti with clams) which was also very good. My mother's amatriciana (red sauce with pancetta and red chilies) was certainly good, but not the level of the other dishes. Family restaurant with buffet of appetizers. Simple decor. Goods selection of wines.
Public - 6 months ago
reviewed 6 months ago
27 reviews
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Double cheddar style burger and onion rings very good. Shakes are very thick. A lot of food for little $. Clean and new. These folks are trying, and it shows. Cookout has a drive through, but the burgers seem cooked to order. If they can keep this quality of experience going, Cookout will be my preferred fast food place around Georgia Tech.
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
Sign on the door says "Caffetteria Tavola Calda Pizzeria Gastronomical." Good for a quick bite: slices of pizza, arroncini (fried rice balls with filling), hot dogs in pastry (tried - pretty good for its genre). A better idea, though, is the sit down service where there is much more variety. I had a fried chicken cutlet and fries. With some salt and lemon, it was pretty tasty. Omelette with ham and cheese was good as well. Very helpful staff and fast service. The meatballs and rolled beef looks like a good choice. Fast turn over. A good quick option on the way to the Vatican museums.
• • •
Public - 6 months ago
reviewed 6 months ago
The service is a well oiled machine, which is rare next to tourist destinations in Europe. extensive menu, executed well. Open all day. Food is a step above. Garlic is a staple. Good for drinks or a gorge fest. staff cares and takes pride in their work. update: ate here for a third time. changing daily specials. recommend the veal in Gorgonzola if they have it (small portion by American standards but tasty). bresaola and rocket salad is tasty. ham and Gorgonzola pizza is good too. good cheese plates and amazing chocolate gelato for dessert. try a bottle of Camenere wine from Veneto. they cook an artichoke until you can eat the whole thing. my party of 4 keeps eating more than we intended. Good consistent stop with a big enough menu that we didn't bother looking for alternatives.
• • •
Public - 6 months ago
reviewed 6 months ago