Profile

Cover photo
Verified name
The TerraMar Project
73,082 followers|44,422,670 views
AboutPostsCollectionsPhotosYouTube

Stream

The TerraMar Project

Shared publicly  - 
 
Sea grapes may sound like something Poseidon would snack on, and not a killer algae. Yet Caulerpa racemosa var. cylindracea poses a serious threat to marine life. Spread by the bilge water of boats, this fast-growing alga is quick to take root, squeezing out native species. But there is one spot in the Mediterranean where cylindracea hasn’t yet taken over, and biologists like Juan Manuel Ruiz Fernández are trying to discover why.

Learn more in The Daily Catch: http://theterramarproject.org/thedailycatch/sea-grapes/

#Nature #Wildlife #ocean #InvasiveSpecies
264
17
Sis s's profile photohal mcfarlane's profile photosuresh yadav's profile photoRebecca Johonson's profile photo
9 comments
 
That really cool ...

Add a comment...

The TerraMar Project

Shared publicly  - 
 
The red knot is a tiny shorebird that undertakes a mind-boggling migration from the tip of South America all the way to the Arctic Circle. One of the few stops on that marathon journey is the Delaware Bay, an estuary that offers a banquet for migrating birds. Here, for some 20,000 years, red knots have flocked by the thousands to fuel their journey. But humans may be writing a tragic ending to this extraordinary evolutionary success story, unless biologists armed with an unusual tool can win a race against time.

Learn more in The Daily Catch: http://theterramarproject.org/thedailycatch/red-knot/

#birds #nature #wildlife
218
7
Shubhangi Saini's profile photovall med's profile photoPottan Karuppasamy's profile photoBenzie Papol Nap's profile photo
10 comments
 
Looking for food?
Add a comment...

The TerraMar Project

Shared publicly  - 
 
#HappyFathersDay to #Dad's of all species!
567
29
Sina Akramsara's profile photoJuanita Fuentes Lagos's profile photo
24 comments
 
Increíblemente grande y maravillosos 
 ·  Translate
Add a comment...

The TerraMar Project

Shared publicly  - 
 
In the vast ocean, without walls and far from the floor, jellyfish can become drifting islands of activity. Creatures from far and wide will congregate on them to act out the ups and downs of life and death. Jellyfish have symbiotic relationships with living things of all sizes, from fish and shrimp that feed off them or off the pieces of food left between their tentacles, to single-celled photosynthesizing organisms that take shelter inside the cytoplasm of the jellyfish’s cells.

Learn more in The Daily Catch: http://theterramarproject.org/thedailycatch/creaturecast-fried-egg-jellyfish/

#Nature #Wildlife #Ocean #Jellyfish
290
14
Masao Takeda's profile photoFeri M's profile photoJackquline Benton's profile photoKirth Thomas's profile photo
14 comments
 
Nice
Add a comment...

The TerraMar Project

Shared publicly  - 
 
CreatureCast.org brings you stories about the unexpected world of animals. In this episode, Dr. Phil Pugh talks about studying jellyfish that cannot be collected in nets, and about his first times seeing live ones. These jellyfish are called siphonophores.

This work is provided under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial No-Derivatives license. Music by The Golden Hours. Many thanks to the Bioluminescence Lab at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute for the submarine footage, which was taken at 1,044 meters depth.

Learn more in The Daily Catch: http://theterramarproject.org/thedailycatch/creaturecast-footage-from-the-deep/

#Nature #Wildlife #Ocean
266
16
Biah Kadın's profile photo‫مجدي حامدي‬‎'s profile photoCourtney Hernandez's profile photoSonam Bhargava's profile photo
6 comments
 
Cool
Add a comment...

The TerraMar Project

Shared publicly  - 
 
The TerraMar Project (http://theterramarproject.org) is a nonprofit ocean organization dedicated to building a global community built around our mutual love of the ocean and the need to protect and conserve the seas.

We will use the power of our global community to be the voice that leads the clarion call for change on how we manage the ocean and the creatures that call it home.

By getting your ocean passport and becoming an ocean citizen you are joining the world's fastest growing community dedicated to giving a voice to the least talked about and most forgotten part of our planet.

Thank you to Jana Winderen for the audio compilation.
4
1
Add a comment...

The TerraMar Project

Shared publicly  - 
 
Siphonophores are regular visitors in the midwater. These animals form colonies where groups of individuals carry out specific functions.

Photo: NOAA

#Nature #ocean #Wildlife
147
12
Biah Kadın's profile photo
 
Very beautiful
Add a comment...

The TerraMar Project

Shared publicly  - 
 
The ocean is Earth’s last unexplored frontier, with millions of unknown species lurking in its depths. Most of those animals, though mysterious, have recognizable features: eyes, teeth, fins.

But one strange creature more closely resembles a giant, luminous condom adrift at sea. The glowing cylindrical structure floats in tropical waters and is built of hundreds, and sometimes thousands of tiny creatures. Together, the colony of animals forms the mystical glowing roll called a pyrosome.

Learn more in The Daily Catch: http://theterramarproject.org/thedailycatch/meet-the-pyrosome-one-of-the-oceans-strangest-creatures/

#Nature #Wildlife #Ocean
269
15
Rietje Bolleman's profile photoSade Mayer's profile photoSimmy Sehmi's profile photoSheryl Tade's profile photo
8 comments
 
Strange, but the color looks amazing.
Add a comment...

The TerraMar Project

Shared publicly  - 
 
Join us today as we celebrate #Solstice2016!

To learn more about the event, check out this story in The Daily Catch: http://theterramarproject.org/thedailycatch/solstice-2016-global-celebration-world-universe/

#Solstice #TeamOcean #GlobalEvent
17
1
Add a comment...

The TerraMar Project

Shared publicly  - 
 
How Krill Grow

Early last year, at the Australian Antarctic Division (AAD), Lisa Roberts saw an unusual sight: the birth of a live Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba.

The newborn appeared on a video screen that projected the view of a camera poised over a petri dish. A tremulous form emerged from its egg with its legs beating furiously!

This event began a continuing conversation with krill research leader, So Kawaguchi.

Back in Lisa’s Sydney studio, she worked with So’s words and images. He explained (by email) how krill grow, and sent diagrams by John Kirkwood to work with. Lisa also found data sets online of how krill appendages move (Uwe Kils).

Learn more in The Daily Catch: http://theterramarproject.org/thedailycatch/creaturecast-how-krill-grow/

#Nature #Wildlife #Krill #Antarctica
121
4
Xueen Tan's profile photoJackquline Benton's profile photoWill Lofgreen's profile photoPaul Hoang's profile photo
14 comments
 
Good food! Yum!!!
Add a comment...

The TerraMar Project

Shared publicly  - 
 
We love the ocean, do you?

+The TerraMar Project is an ocean conservation nonprofit on a mission to transform the way people think about the ocean and value the seas by creating a global, engaged, and informed community of ocean lovers.

Follow us on Google+, share us with your friends, and get your free ocean passport! 
Ocean love is spreading like a wave! Take the "I Love the Ocean Pledge" and receive your free digital passport to land and sea! Where will you explore with your new passport? Yes, subscribe me to The Daily Catch so I can get the best ocean, river, and lake news in the world delivered straight to ...
6
3
Add a comment...

The TerraMar Project

Shared publicly  - 
 
These Underwater Dragons Can Live up to 100 Years

The strange, slithery creatures inside Slovenia’s Postojna cave were once considered living proof that dragons existed, prompting locals to give it a wide berth.

Now, large crowds from all over the world have been queueing up to witness the extremely rare hatching of the mysterious olms – ancient underwater predators that can live up to 100 years and only breed once in a decade.

Their treat came yesterday when the translucent larva broke through the delicate egg envelope after four months of nervously monitored gestation

The birth, caught on live camera, is nothing short of “a miracle”, cave spokesmen said.

Learn more in The Daily Catch: http://theterramarproject.org/thedailycatch/underwater-dragons-can-live-100-years/

#Nature #Wildlife #Dragons #Olms
384
37
Babbie Lefort's profile photoaniket yadav's profile photo
26 comments
 
Cool 
Add a comment...
The TerraMar Project's Collections
People
Have them in circles
73,082 people
Mark Robinson's profile photo
Jerry Shea's profile photo
tonya harrison's profile photo
Ksenia Saenko's profile photo
Sedrice Williams's profile photo
david watkins's profile photo
Mayer S.'s profile photo
Pan Shuyuan (Simon)'s profile photo
Jason Sughrue's profile photo
Contact Information
Contact info
Email
Story
Tagline
Sea Hope. Sea Change. Sea Future.
Introduction

We're a nonprofit on a mission to create a global community to give voice to the least protected and most ignored part of our planet - the high seas. Join us! It's free, fun and you get a digital passport to the high seas. 

Description


The TerraMar Project provides the tools to empower our global community to act, get educated, get the latest news, and socially engage with one another.

We have created the I Love the Ocean Pledge -- it says that you love the ocean and you'd like the ocean to be managed sustainably for generations to come. Take the pledge