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The TerraMar Project
72,898 followers -
Sea Hope. Sea Change. Sea Future.
Sea Hope. Sea Change. Sea Future.

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Cruising into #FlatSharkFriday like this Cownose Ray.

Learn more about the incredible marine life in our world's oceans by visiting us at: www.theterramarproject.org

Photo: David Clode/Unsplash

#MarineLife #Ray #Elasmobranchs #SaveOurOcean #Nature #VitaminSea #SeaHope #OceanOptimism
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The face only a mother (ocean) could love. California Sheephead Semicossyphus pulcher are a truly unique member of the California Kelp Forest community.

All sheephead are born female. Most of them change to males following environmental clues we don't fully understand. Male and female sheephead have different color patterns and body shapes. Males are larger, with black tail and head sections, wide, reddish orange midriffs, red eyes and fleshy forehead bumps. Female sheephead are dull pink with white undersides. Both sexes sport white chins and large, protruding canine teeth that can pry hard-shelled animals from rocks.

During the late 1800s, Chinese fishermen caught large numbers of sheephead for drying and salting. Except for brief periods, fishermen didn't target sheephead again until the late 1980s, when commercial fisheries began to supply live fish to Asian markets and restaurants.

Learn more about the incredible marine life in our world's oceans by visiting us at: www.theterramarproject.org

Photo: Kristin Riser/Wikimedia Commons (CC0)

#OurOcean #MarineLife #SeaHope #MarineBio #Fish #Overfishing #Conservation #VitaminSea #Nature
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The Arctic Skua Stercorarius parasiticus a.k.a the Parasitic Jaeger is an aggressive seabird that acts as an avian pirate on the sea. Skuas steal most of their food from terns, puffins, and other seabirds carrying fish back to their nests.

Skuas strike by attacking in midair and forcing their victims to drop their prey in flight. The swashbuckling birds sometimes team up to overwhelm their victims, and they are relentless in chasing them down.This phenomena of stealing other animal's food is known in ecology as Kleptoparasitism.

Arctic Skuas live most of their lives at sea, and come back to shore to breed in the Arctic summer. These birds are highly migratory, and fly down to the southern hemisphere for the winter.

Learn more about the incredible marine life in our world's oceans by visiting us at: www.theterramarproject.org

Photo: A. Weith/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0)

#seabirds #bird #wildlife #oceanlife #seahope #conservation #marinebio #ecology #VitaminSea #cleanseas
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Oval Squid Sepioteuthis lessoniana are characterized by their large oval fin that extends throughout the margins of their mantle, giving them a similar look to cuttlefish. Like some cephalopods, these squids are capable of metachrosis โ€“ rapidly changing body colouration and patterns through voluntary control of chromatophores. Oval squids have actually been found to use their color changing abilities as a method of communicating with potential mates during reproduction.

These small squids live in temperate and tropical regions of the Indian Ocean and the western Pacific Ocean, and feed mostly on small fish and crustaceans. They're a commercially important species of loliginid squid as well throughout the region. They currently have not been assessed by the IUCN Red List.

Learn more about the incredible marine life in our world's oceans by visiting us at: www.theterramarproject.org

Photo: George Berninger Jr./Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

#marinelife #ovalsquid #squid #cephalopod #marinespecies #waterislife #VitaminSea #marineconservation #TerraMar #naturealwayswins #seahope #seachange #seafuture
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Meet the world's most endangered sea turtle: The Kemp's Ridley Sea Turtle Lepidochelys kempii. These turtles are listed as Critically Endangered, mainly because of the harvest of their eggs over the past century. Even though these incredible ocean animals are now protected on the beaches they visit to nest, and fishermen are taking measures to limit the bycatch of these turtles in fishing gears, Kemp's Ridley sea turtles have not yet recovered.

Found primarily in the Gulf of Mexico, but also as far north as Nova Scotia, Kempโ€™s ridleys are among the smallest sea turtles, reaching only about 2 feet in shell length and weighing up to 100 pounds. Their upper shell, or carapace, is a greenish-grey color, and their bellies are off-white to yellowish.

They prefer shallow waters, where they dive to the bottom to feed on crabs, which are their favorite food, and other shellfish. They also eat jellyfish, and occasionally munch on seaweed and sargassum. They may live to be 50 years old.

Photo: NPS/Wikimedia Commons (CC0)

#MarineLife #Endangered #SaveOurOcean #Conservation #SeaHope #OceanLife #SeaTurtles #SaveSeaTurtles #KempsRidley #MarineBio #Ecology
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Peacock Flounders are true masters of disguise. They use cryptic coloration to hide from both predators and prey in tropical coral reefs of the Atlantic. Adults will remain on the ocean floor, buried in the sand waiting for smaller fish to swim by for an easy meal.

Like other flounder species, adult Peacock Flounders have both eyes on the same side of their head. However they aren't born like this. Flounders are born like other fish with one eye on each side of their head and they swim as other fish do in the water column. As they grow, their right eye drifts over the the left side of their body, and the flounders begin to swim sideways on the ocean floor.

Peacock Flounders are considered to be a species of Least Concern by the IUCN Red List because they aren't caught commonly by commercial fisheries, and their only major known threat is the invasive lionfish which can prey on these flounder.

Learn more about the incredible marine life in our world's oceans by visiting us at: www.theterramarproject.org

Photo: Johnmartindavies-Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

#flounder #marinebiology #oceanlife #conservation #education #marinescience #saveourocean #coralreef #seahope
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The Mandarin Fish Synchiropus splendidus has possibly the most attractive coloration pattern in the reef fish community. These fish are also sometimes called Psychedelic fish due to their rather bizarre coloration. Found most commonly at inshore reefs and lagoons, these guys spend their days feeding on crustaceans and other bottom-dwelling invertebrates. They range from the Ryukyu Islands south to Australia, and are very popular in the aquarium trade thanks to their incredible coloration.

The conservation status of these animals has not been assessed but the IUCN Red List, but they appear to exist in fairly abundant numbers in the wild.

To learn more about the incredible life in our world's oceans, visiti us at: www.theterramarproject.org

Photo: Steve Childs/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0)

#marinelife #marinespecies #mandarinfish #TerraMar #seahope #seachange #seafuture #marineconservation #oceanhealth
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Ospreys are some of the world's best fishermen. These eagle-like birds dive from 30-100 feet up, and pluck fish from the water's surface with their curved claws. These avian predators can be found on every continent besides Antarctica.

Because their diet consists of 99% fish, Ospreys can be found near ponds, rivers, lakes, and coastal waterways around the world. Human habitat is sometimes an aid to the osprey. The birds happily build large nests on telephone poles, channel markers, and other such locations. Artificial nesting platforms are common in areas where preservationists are working to reestablish the birds. North American osprey populations became endangered in the 1950s due to chemical pollutants such as DDT, which thinned their eggshells and hampered reproduction. Ospreys have rebounded significantly in recent decades, though they remain scarce in some locales.

Learn more about the incredible marine life in our world's oceans by visiting us at: www.theterramarproject.org

Photo: NASA

#seabirds #oceanlife #VitaminSea #fishing #bird #osprey #conservation #cleanseas #fish #saveourocean
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