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Ted Driver
Attended University of California, San Diego
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There is some great unbelievable footage here!  Full-screen recommended.
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Summer doesn't last forever. 
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New Horizons Color Images Reveal Two Distinct Faces of Pluto

New color images from NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft show two very different faces of the mysterious dwarf planet, one with a series of intriguing spots along the equator that are evenly spaced. Each of the spots is about 300 miles in diameter, with a surface area that’s roughly the size of the state of Missouri.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/LORRI

Read more: http://buff.ly/1Cbtlho
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And the guy who came up with the name is surprised it got by everyone else!
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...when "it grabbed and crushed him against a metal plate".  All this without AI.
BERLIN (AP) — A robot has killed a contractor at one of Volkswagen's production plants in Germany, the automaker said Wednesday.
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Fractals are everywhere.  Now they've been found in the drum track of this 80's song.  The drummer didn't know he was using fractals when he was playing, but his mind created a self-similar track.
By analyzing the hi-hat in a hit single, physicists demonstrate a uniquely human way of keeping a beat.
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Very fascinating information. Although,  I wonder how many of these fractals we are "finding" are the result of apophenia. Fractals have infinite resolution and 1000 hi-hat strikes does not provide the zoom levels of even 1980's era computations. 
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Here's a pic - damn, this is a huge loss.
 
It looks like the Space Station astronauts are gonna have to start cutting back on rations.

The Falcon just blew up.

#SpaceX  
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I hope it's a quick investigation and they can get back to the pad soon.... and same for Orbital.
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Chaos made simple

This shows a lot of tiny particles moving around.   If you were one of these particles, it would be hard to predict where you'd go.  See why?  It's because each time you approach the crossing, it's hard to tell whether you'll go into the left loop or the right one. 

You can predict which way you'll go: it's not random.  But to predict it, you need to know your position quite accurately.  And each time you go around, it gets worse.  You'd need to know your position extremely accurately to predict which way you go — left or right — after a dozen round trips. 

This effect is called deterministic chaos.  Deterministic chaos happens when something is so sensitive to small changes in conditions that its motion is very hard to predict in practice, even though it's not actually random.

This particular example of deterministic chaos is one of the first and most famous.  It's the Lorenz attractor, invented by Edward Lorenz as a very simplified model of the weather in 1963.

The equations for the Lorentz attractor are not very complicated if you know calculus.  They say how the x, y and z coordinates of a point change with time:

dx/dt = 10(x-y)
dy/dt = x(28-z) - y
dz/dt = xy - 8z/3

You are not supposed to be able to look at these equations and say "Ah yes!  I see why these give chaos!"   Don't worry: if you get nothing out of these equations, it doesn't mean you're "not a math person"  — just as not being able to easily paint the Mona Lisa after you see it doesn't mean you're "not an art person".  Lorenz had to solve them using a computer to discover chaos.  I personally have no intuition as to why these equations work... though I could get such intuition if I spent a week reading about it.

The weird numbers here are adjustable, but these choices are the ones Lorenz originally used.  I don't know what choices David Szakaly used in his animation.  Can you find out?

If you imagine a tiny drop of water flowing around as shown in this picture, each time it goes around it will get stretched in one direction.  It will get squashed in another direction, and be neither squashed nor stretched in a third direction. 

The stretching is what causes the unpredictability: small changes in the initial position will get amplified.  I believe the squashing is what keeps the two loops in this picture quite flat.  Particles moving around these loops are strongly attracted to move along a flat 'conveyor belt'.  That's why it's called the Lorentz attractor.

With the particular equations I wrote down, the drop will get stretched in one direction by a factor of about 2.47... but squashed in another direction by a factor of about 2 million!    At least that's what this physicist at the University of Wisconsin says:

• J. C. Sprott, Lyapunov exponent and dimension of the Lorenz attractor, http://sprott.physics.wisc.edu/chaos/lorenzle.htm

He has software for calculating these numbers - or more precisely their logarithms, which are called Lyapunov exponents.  He gets 0.906, 0, and -14.572 for the Lyapunov exponents.

The region that attracts particles — roughly the glowing region in this picture — is a kind of fractal.  Its dimension is slightly more than 2, which means it's very flat but slightly 'fuzzed out'.  Actually there are different ways to define the dimension, and Sprott computes a few of them.  If you want to understand what's going on, try this:

• Edward Ott, Attractor dimensions, http://www.scholarpedia.org/article/Attractor_dimensions

For more nice animations of the Lorentz attractor, see:

http://visualizingmath.tumblr.com/post/121710431091/a-sample-solution-in-the-lorenz-attractor-when

David Szakaly has a blog called dvdp full of astounding images:

http://dvdp.tumblr.com/

and presumably this one of the Lorenz attractor is buried in there somewhere, though I'm feeling too lazy to do an image search and find it.
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I love tea and this is pretty dang cool.
 
Make some tea that's out of this world! Astronaut and Space Capsule Tea Infuser: http://j.mp/1Nxw8Sr
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I showed this to +Aaron Harper and the first thing he said was "cool!" next thing he said was "It's Grissom!" 
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Just had a fuzzy visitor!
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In the past week, a plate sized snapping turtle at the back door, at least three dear, bunny and gopher.
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Really?  Just call this a purse.  Guys can have purses. Or bags, or whatever.
Bags come in all shapes and sizes. Case in point, Everyday Carry reader Tony Beckham shares his tiny little messenger bag that still fits everything he needs for the day.
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I get the feeling that scotsmen have always been a bit more secure in their manhood than their english counterparts. :)
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#SpaceX Launch failure - s**t!
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Have him in circles
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Education
  • University of California, San Diego
    B.S. Physics, 1991
  • University of Colorado at Colorado Springs
    M.S. Computational Physics, 1997
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Learning one click at a time, then I automate it.
Introduction
I'm a software developer and navigation engineer by day.  I have many and varied interests, from science and education to history, philosophy and the story of humans. 
Other activities include meditation, reading, music, and wondering how it is that consciousness affects reality by collapsing wave functions.

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Software developer, Algorithm designer, Navigation engineer
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.Net, Java, HTML, other web and back-end development techniques. Physics, math and statistics related analyses.
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