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Ted Driver
Attended University of California, San Diego
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Ted Driver

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Steve!  You were supposed to prototype this in KSP.
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John P. “Astrogator John” Carrico Jr.'s profile photo
 
Yikes!
(btw, APL used Astrogator for this trajectory!  Hope there is not an odd number of sign errors!)
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Busy day on the hill.
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The birdhouse looks homey.
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Two B-1 bombers flying around this morning (look close!).  Probably in prep for the Air Force Academy graduation this Thursday.
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We see the big planes, C-130's etc, flying runs up against the mountains doing banks and turns. Always cool to see them.
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I'll be watching this one - wow.
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Hang on!
 
SpaceX Pad Abort Test | Point of View Video
May 22, 2015: The Pad Abort Test was the first key flight test of the Crew Dragon spacecraft, a vehicle designed to carry astronauts to and from space. Dragon traveled from 0-100 mph in 1.2 seconds, reaching a max velocity of 345 mph.

The test simulated how Dragon would carry astronauts to safety if an emergency occurred on the launch pad. Crew Dragon’s abort system is powered by eight SuperDraco engines which together produce 120,000 pounds of axial thrust. The engines are integrated directly into the sides of the vehicle rather than carried on top of the vehicle as with previous launch abort systems. This configuration provides astronauts escape capability from the launch pad all the way to orbit and allows the spacecraft to use the same thrusters to land propulsively on land at the end of a mission.

For more information on the test, see: www.spacex.com/news/2015/05/06/crew-dragon-completes-pad-abort-test

Credit: SpaceX

+SpaceX 
+NASA's Kennedy Space Center 
+Elon Musk 
+The Elon Musk Fan Club 

#NASA #SpaceX #Space #Dragon #Spacecraft #SuperDraco
#Engines #ISS #Crew #Astronaut #Test #Abort #Pad #Emergency
#ElonMusk #Kennedy #KSC #CapeCanaveral #Florida #USA
#UnitedStates #AirForce #Commercial #NewSpace #CCiCap
#Parachute #Atlantic #Ocean
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Greg Beatty's profile photo
 
That looks like a fun ride! Assuming you're not riding it to escape an exploding rocket of course.
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With all of the rain here, and on top the snow
Today Pikes Peak decided to show

#Colorado
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Ted Driver

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I love Trips!  Not only does it have my upcoming trips, but it has all of my past trips as well!  Truly innovative - thanks for organizing my life Google!
 
With Trip Bundles, all of your emails about a trip are bundled together with the most important details highlighted.
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As someone who travels a lot, this is the feature I'm looking forward to the most.  Now AT&T get on that software update!
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Math is only one of AOL's problems.  Still living 10 years behind.
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Wow. Dude has got to see The Wire.
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I can't put enough smiley faces in this post!
Way to go +SpaceX !!
NASA has formally certified SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket to launch all but the space agency's most costly robotic science missions, beginning with a a U.S.-French oceanography satellite set for liftoff from California in July. NASA's Launch Services Program, which manages the agency's rocket ...
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Gamma function fractals, in case you're tired of Mandelbrot and Julia sets.
Richard Green originally shared to Mathematics:
 
The Gamma Function and Fractal Factorials!

This fractal image by Thomas Oléron Evans was created by using iterations of the Gamma function, which is a continuous version of the factorial function.

If n is a positive integer, the factorial of n, n!, is defined to be the product of all the integers from 1 up to n; for example, 4!=1x2x3x4=24. It is clear from the definition that (n+1)! is the product of n+1 and n!, but it is not immediately clear what the “right” way is to extend the factorial function to non-integer values.

If t is a complex number with a positive real part, the Gamma function Γ(t) is defined by integrating the function x^{t–1}e^{–x} from x=0 to infinity. It is a straightforward exercise using integration by parts and mathematical induction to prove that if n is a positive integer, then Γ(n) is equal to (n–1)!, the factorial of (n–1). Since Γ(1)=1, this gives a justification (there are many others) that the factorial of zero is 1.

Using a technique called analytic continuation, the Gamma function can then be extended to all complex numbers except negative integers and zero. The resulting function, Γ(t), is infinitely differentiable, except at the nonpositive integers, where it has simple poles; the latter are the same kind of singularity that the function f(x)=1/x has at x=0. A particularly nice property of the Gamma function is that it satisfies Γ(t+1)=tΓ(t), which extends the recursive property n!=n(n–1)! satisfied by factorials. It is therefore natural to define the factorial of a complex number z by z!=Γ(z+1).

At first, it may not seem very likely that iterating the complex factorial could produce interesting fractals. If n is an integer that is at least 3, then taking repeated factorials of n will produce a sequence that tends to infinity very quickly. However, if one starts with certain complex numbers, such as 1–i, repeated applications of the complex factorial behave very differently. It turns out that (1–i)! is approximately 0.653–0.343i, and taking factorials five times, we find that (1–i)!!!!! is approximately 0.991–0.003i. This suggests that iterated factorials of 1–i  may produce a sequence that converges to 1.

It turns out that if one takes repeated factorials of almost any complex number, we either obtain a sequence that converges to 1 (as in the case of 1–i) or a sequence that diverges to infinity (as in the case of 3). However, it is not possible to take factorials of negative integers, and there are some rare numbers, like z=2, that are solutions of z!=z and do not exhibit either type of behaviour.

By plotting the points that diverge to infinity in one colour, and the points that converge to 1 in a different colour, fractal patterns emerge. The image shown here uses an ad hoc method of colouring points to indicate the rate of convergence or divergence. The points that converge to 1 are coloured from red (fast convergence) to yellow (slow convergence), and the points that diverge to infinity are coloured from green (slow divergence) to blue (fast divergence)

Relevant links

Thomas Oléron Evans discusses these fractals in detail in a blog post (http://www.mathistopheles.co.uk/2015/05/14/fractal-factorials/) which contains this image and many others. He (and I) would be interested in knowing if these fractals have been studied before.

The applications of the Gamma function in mathematics are extensive. Wikipedia has much more information about the function here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamma_function

This post appears in my Mathematics collection at https://plus.google.com/collection/8zrhX

#mathematics #sciencesunday  

Various recent posts by me
Camellia flower: https://goo.gl/8WNrlu
Horse chestnut tree: https://goo.gl/FPCGI3
A Curious Property of 82000: https://goo.gl/1rVg8y
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Beautiful!
 
SpaceX-6 Dragon Recovered off California Coast and Unloaded!
3,100 lbs of cargo have been offloaded and the spacecraft is powered down. Dragon is back in its nest after about 5 weeks at the International Space Station.

Credit: SpaceX

+SpaceX 
+Elon Musk 
+The Elon Musk Fan Club
+NASA Johnson Space Center 
+NASA's Kennedy Space Center 

#NASA #Space #ISS #SpaceX #Dragon #Commercial #Cargo #Earth #CRS6 #ElonMusk #Science #Research #Experiments #Spacecraft
#California #Pacific #Ocean #UnitedStates #USA #Expedition43
#Photography #Art #STEM #Education
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Education
  • University of California, San Diego
    B.S. Physics, 1991
  • University of Colorado at Colorado Springs
    M.S. Computational Physics, 1997
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Learning one click at a time, then I automate it.
Introduction
I'm a software developer and navigation engineer by day.  I have many and varied interests, from science and education to history, philosophy and the story of humans. 
Other activities include meditation, reading, music, and wondering how it is that consciousness affects reality by collapsing wave functions.

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Software developer, Algorithm designer, Navigation engineer
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.Net, Java, HTML, other web and back-end development techniques. Physics, math and statistics related analyses.
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