Profile

Cover photo
Ted Driver
Attended University of California, San Diego
1,314 followers|757,780 views
AboutPostsCollectionsPhotosYouTube

Stream

Ted Driver

Shared publicly  - 
 
Damn. Well, at least I know what the Anomaly is.
1
Add a comment...

Ted Driver

Shared publicly  - 
 
We definitely are not alone in the universe.
Link to the paper: http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1089/ast.2015.1418
A new study recalculates the likelihood of intelligent life existing elsewhere in the cosmos
6
Add a comment...

Ted Driver

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
I feel like +Patrick Stuart and +Jason Sholtis need to see this if they haven't already. Altamura man. Possibly 130,000 years old. Current thought is that this neanderthal dude was wounded, fell upside down in a crack in a cave, and died of starvation. But only the calcite remembers.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Altamura_Man
9 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Ted Driver

Shared publicly  - 
 
Lots of positions open at AGI! Something of interest?
http://www.agi.com/careers/
AGI provides COTS software to national security and space professionals for integrated analyses and visualization of land, sea, air, and space assets. Application areas include battlespace management, geospatial intelligence, space operations, and missile defense.
3
Add a comment...

Ted Driver

Shared publicly  - 
 
True, always keep up to date.
 
You're so sharp, Tyrion.
View original post
2
1
Add a comment...

Ted Driver

Shared publicly  - 
 
:(
 
"And then we wept."

The chatter of gossip distracts us from the really big story, the Anthropocene: the new geological era we are bringing about.   Pay attention for a minute.  Most of the Great Barrier Reef, the world's largest coral reef system, now looks like a ghostly graveyard.  

Most corals are colonies of tiny genetically identical animals called polyps.   Over centuries, their skeletons build up reefs, which are havens for many kinds of sea life.  Some coral polyps can catch their own food using stingers.  But most get their food by symbiosis!  They cooperate with algae called zooxanthellae.  These algae get energy from the sun's light.   They actually live inside the polyps, and provide them with of their food.  Most of the color of a coral reef comes from these zooxanthellae.

For reasons I don't understand, when a polyp gets stressed, it can kick out the zooxanthellae living in it.   This happens when the sea water gets too hot.  Without the zooxanthellae, the polyp is transparent and the coral's white skeleton is revealed - as you see here.  We say the coral is bleached.

After they bleach, the polyps begin to starve.  If conditions return to normal fast enough, the zooxanthellae may come back.   If they don't, the coral will die.

The Great Barrier Reef, off the northeast coast of Australia, contains over 2,900 reefs and 900 islands.  It's huge: 2,300 kilometers long with an area of about 340,000 square kilometers.  It can be seen from outer space!

With global warming, this reef has been starting to bleach.  Parts of it bleached in 1998 and again in 2002.  But this year, with a big El Niño pushing world temperatures to new record highs, is the worst.

Scientists have being flying over the Great Barrier Reef to study the damage, and divers have looked at some of the reefs in detail.  Of the 522 reefs surveyed in the northern section, over 80% are severely bleached and less than 1% are not bleached at all.    Of 226 reefs surveyed in the central section, 33% are severely bleached and 10% are not bleached.  Of 163 reefs in the southern section, 1% are severely bleached and 25% are not bleached. 

The top expert on coral reefs in Australia, Terry Hughes, wrote:

“I showed the results of aerial surveys of bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef to my students.  And then we wept.”

Some of the bleached reefs may recover.  But as oceans continue to warm, the prospects look bleak.  The last big El Niño was in 1998.  With a lot of hard followup work, scientists showed that in the end, 16% of the world’s corals died in that event. 

This year is quite a bit hotter.

So, global warming is not a problem for the future: it's a problem now.   It's not good enough to cut carbon emissions eventually.   We've got to get serious now.  

I need to recommit myself to this.  For example, I need to stop flying around to conferences.  I've cut back, but I need to do much better.  Future generations, living in the damaged world we're creating, will not have much sympathy for our excuses.
47 comments on original post
3
Add a comment...

Ted Driver

Shared publicly  - 
 
Speechless.
 
NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) recently captured a unique view of Earth from the spacecraft's vantage point in orbit around the moon.

"The image is simply stunning," said Noah Petro, Deputy Project Scientist for LRO at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. "The image of the Earth evokes the famous 'Blue Marble' image taken by Astronaut Harrison Schmitt during Apollo 17, 43 years ago, which also showed Africa prominently in the picture."

In this composite image we see Earth appear to rise over the lunar horizon from the viewpoint of the spacecraft, with the center of the Earth just off the coast of Liberia (at 4.04 degrees North, 12.44 degrees West).

The large tan area in the upper right is the Sahara Desert, and just beyond is Saudi Arabia. The Atlantic and Pacific coasts of South America are visible to the left. On the moon, we get a glimpse of the crater Compton, which is located just beyond the eastern limb of the moon, on the lunar farside.

LRO was launched on June 18, 2009, and has collected a
treasure trove of data with its seven powerful instruments, making an invaluable contribution to our knowledge about the moon. LRO experiences 12 earthrises every day; however the spacecraft is almost always busy imaging the lunar surface so only rarely does an opportunity arise such that its camera instrument can capture a view of Earth. Occasionally LRO points off into space to acquire observations of the extremely thin lunar atmosphere and perform instrument calibration measurements. During these movements sometimes Earth (and other planets) pass through the camera's field of view and dramatic images such as the one shown here are acquired.


This image was composed from a series of images taken Oct. 12, when LRO was about 83 miles (134 kilometers) above the moon's farside crater Compton. Capturing an image of the Earth and moon with LRO's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) instrument is a complicated task. First the spacecraft must be rolled to the side (in this case 67 degrees), then the spacecraft slews with the direction of travel to maximize the width of the lunar horizon in LROC's Narrow Angle Camera image. All this takes place while LRO is traveling faster than 3,580 miles per hour (over 1,600 meters per second) relative to the lunar surface below the spacecraft!

The high-resolution Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) on LRO takes black-and-white images, while the lower resolution Wide Angle Camera (WAC) takes color images, so you might wonder how we got a high-resolution picture of the Earth in color. Since the spacecraft, Earth, and moon are all in motion, we had to do some special processing to create an image that represents the view of the Earth and moon at one particular time. The final Earth image contains both WAC and NAC information. WAC provides the color, and the NAC provides high-resolution detail.

"From the Earth, the daily moonrise and moonset are always inspiring moments," said Mark Robinson of Arizona State University in Tempe, principal investigator for LROC. "However, lunar astronauts will see something very different: viewed from the lunar surface, the Earth never rises or sets. Since the moon is tidally locked, Earth is always in the same spot above the horizon, varying only a small amount with the slight wobble of the moon. The Earth may not move across the 'sky', but the view is not static. Future astronauts will see the continents rotate in and out of view and the ever-changing pattern of clouds will always catch one's eye, at least on the nearside. The Earth is never visible from the farside; imagine a sky with no Earth or moon - what will farside explorers think with no Earth overhead?"



NASA's first Earthrise image was taken with the Lunar Orbiter 1 spacecraft in 1966. Perhaps NASA's most iconic Earthrise photo was taken by the crew of the Apollo 8 mission as the spacecraft entered lunar orbit on Christmas Eve Dec. 24, 1968.

That evening, the astronauts -- Commander Frank Borman, Command Module Pilot Jim Lovell, and Lunar Module Pilot William Anders -- held a live broadcast from lunar orbit, in which they showed pictures of the Earth and moon as seen from their spacecraft. Said Lovell, "The vast loneliness is awe-inspiring and it makes you realize just what you have back there on Earth."


Image Credit: NASA/Goddard/Arizona State University
View original post
3
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
1,314 people
Boehme Tiana's profile photo
David Wales's profile photo
Frantz Tilus's profile photo
Sara Thurman's profile photo
Jeremy Morgan's profile photo
Paul Palumbo's profile photo
Jarl Ove Staurnes's profile photo
Abdul Mannan's profile photo
Mygoodhotels by Francesco Petri's profile photo

Ted Driver

Pictures  - 
 
Flying the Albatross is fun! Once you figure out the light touch needed to control it, you can easily go around the globe in one flight.
Here I take it out on a cross-the-ocean flight, then back again towards the north to search for an anomaly I spotted with my scanning satellite. There is a deep well in the Mountains, but no visible structure.
The controls on the Albatross are touchy; to turn, only use the roll controls. You can maintain level flight by adjusting the engine speed. I didn't know these things taking off, so I lost both landing gear on the outset. Jeb didn't care he just wanted to fly. He did have a rough landing though back at KSP.
8
Tom Justtom's profile photomoppaking's profile photoJacob Semmler's profile photoTed Driver's profile photo
5 comments
 
It took me about an hour of wall clock time. I tried physics warp, but that interfered with the pitch, yaw and roll too much to be useful.
Add a comment...

Ted Driver

Shared publicly  - 
 
Yes! This is huge for SpaceX.
Upstart rocket firm SpaceX scored a huge victory Wednesday with an Air Force Contract to launch one of the Air Force's newest Global Positioning System satellites. The $82.7 million contact to launch the GPS-III spacecraft was snatched by SpaceX, owned by PayPal co-founder Elon Musk. That could be a low for Colorado rocket-builder United Launch Alliance, which has had a hammerlock on military launches for more than a decade.
3
Add a comment...

Ted Driver

Shared publicly  - 
 
Yes!  Commercial is taking over!
4
1
Add a comment...

Ted Driver

Shared publicly  - 
 
Bear Creek Nature Trail
Spring is just starting to show - some bits of grass appearing, small buds on the bushes.
3
Add a comment...

Ted Driver

Shared publicly  - 
 
An explanation? It comes with experimentally verifiable predictions. We'll soon see.
 
Intriguing...

"In 2012, a Chinese team said it had measured a thrust produced by its own version of the EmDrive. In 2014, an American scientist built an EmDrive and persuaded NASA to test it with positive results.

And last year, NASA conducted its own tests in a vacuum to rule out movement of air as the origin of the force. NASA, too, confirmed that the EmDrive produces a thrust. In total, six independent experiments have backed Shawyer’s original claims.

That leaves an important puzzle—how to explain the seeming violation of conservation of momentum.

Today we get an answer of sorts thanks to the work of Mike McCulloch at Plymouth University in the U.K. McCulloch’s explanation is based on a new theory of inertia that makes startling predictions about the way objects move under very small accelerations."

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/601299/the-curious-link-between-the-fly-by-anomaly-and-the-impossible-emdrive-thruster/

Share thanks to +MIT Technology Review 
The same theory that explains the puzzling fly-by anomalies could also explain how the controversial EmDrive produces thrust.
7 comments on original post
2
Add a comment...
Ted's Collections
People
Have him in circles
1,314 people
Boehme Tiana's profile photo
David Wales's profile photo
Frantz Tilus's profile photo
Sara Thurman's profile photo
Jeremy Morgan's profile photo
Paul Palumbo's profile photo
Jarl Ove Staurnes's profile photo
Abdul Mannan's profile photo
Mygoodhotels by Francesco Petri's profile photo
Education
  • University of California, San Diego
    B.S. Physics, 1991
  • University of Colorado at Colorado Springs
    M.S. Computational Physics, 1997
Links
YouTube
Contributor to
Story
Tagline
Learning one click at a time, then I automate it.
Introduction
I'm a software developer and navigation engineer by day.  I have many and varied interests, from science and education to history, philosophy and the story of humans. 
Other activities include meditation, reading, music, and wondering how it is that consciousness affects reality by collapsing wave functions.

Work
Occupation
Software developer, Algorithm designer, Navigation engineer
Skills
.Net, Java, HTML, other web and back-end development techniques. Physics, math and statistics related analyses.
Basic Information
Gender
Male