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Ted Driver
1,256 followers -
Learning one click at a time, then I automate it.
Learning one click at a time, then I automate it.

1,256 followers
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It sounds like Google is shutting down Google+ for consumers (what else is there?). To all my followers, please keep in touch by following me on twitter here: https://twitter.com/TedDriver. It's been fun!
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Looking for a way to download your Google+ data?
Go to https://takeout.google.com, select the Google+ options. There are also options for Hangouts, Hangouts on Air, Google+ +1's and many others.
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First light!
Illuminating First Light Data from Parker Solar Probe
Just over a month into its mission, Parker Solar Probe has returned first-light data from each of its four instrument suites. These early observations – while not yet examples of the key science observations Parker Solar Probe will take closer to the Sun – show that each of the instruments is working well. The instruments work in tandem to measure the Sun’s electric and magnetic fields, particles from the Sun and the solar wind, and capture images of the environment around the spacecraft.

“All instruments returned data that not only serves for calibration, but also captures glimpses of what we expect them to measure near the Sun to solve the mysteries of the solar atmosphere, the corona,” said Nour Raouafi, Parker Solar Probe project scientist at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab in Laurel, Maryland.

The mission’s first close approach to the Sun will be in November 2018, but even now, the instruments are able to gather measurements of what’s happening in the solar wind closer to Earth. Let’s take a look at what they’ve seen so far.

WISPR (Wide-field Imager for Solar Probe)
As the only imager on Parker Solar Probe, WISPR will provide the clearest-yet glimpse of the solar wind from within the Sun’s corona. Comprising two telescopes, WISPR sits behind the heat shield between two antennae from the FIELDS instrument suite. The telescopes were covered by a protective door during launch to keep them safe.

WISPR was turned on in early September 2018 and took closed-door test images for calibration. On Sept. 9, WISPR’s door was opened, allowing the instrument to take the first images during its journey to the Sun.

Russ Howard, WISPR principal investigator from the Naval Research Laboratory, studied the images to determine the instrument was pointing as expected, using celestial landmarks as a guide.

“There is a very distinctive cluster of stars on the overlap of the two images. The brightest is the star Antares-alpha, which is in the constellation Scorpius and is about 90 degrees from the Sun,” said Howard.

The Sun, not visible in the image, is far off to the right of the image’s right edge. The planet Jupiter is visible in the image captured by WISPR’s inner telescope — it’s the bright object slightly right of center in the right-hand panel of the image.

“The left side of the photo shows a beautiful image of the Milky Way, looking at the galactic center,” said Howard.

The exposure time – i.e. the length of time that light was gathered for this image, an interval which can be shortened or lengthened to make the image darker or brighter – is on the lower end, and there’s a reason: “We intentionally wanted to be on the low side in case there was something very bright when we first turned on, but it is primarily because we are looking so far from the Sun,” explains Howard.

As the spacecraft approaches the Sun, its orientation will change, and so will WISPR’s images. With each solar orbit, WISPR will capture images of the structures flowing out from the corona. While measurements have been made before by other instruments at a distance of 1 AU – or approximately 93 million miles – WISPR will get much closer, about 95% of the way to the Sun from Earth, dramatically increasing the ability to see what’s occurring in that region with a much finer scale than ever before and providing a more pristine picture of the solar corona.
...

Read more at:
https://go.nasa.gov/2xuqyQK


By Sarah Frazier (NASA) & Justyna Surowiec (APL)
via NASA Blog Hom
NASA Parker Solar Probe



Image:
The right side of this image — from WISPR’s inner telescope — has a 40-degree field of view, with its right edge 58.5 degrees from the Sun’s center. The left side of the image is from WISPR’s outer telescope, which has a 58-degree field of view and extends to about 160 degrees from the Sun. There is a parallax of about 13 degrees in the apparent position of the Sun as viewed from Earth and from Parker Solar Probe.

Credit: NASA/Naval Research Laboratory/Parker Solar Probe




#NASA #ParkerSolarProbe #WISPR #SpaceCraft #TheSun #Earth #SolarSystem #SpaceScience #SolarScience #Space #Astronomy
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We're fostering kittens these days.
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"It's Business Time" - the first commercial flight for Rocket Labs' Electron rocket, is scheduled to launch April 19.
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"It's Business Time" - the first commercial flight for Rocket Labs' Electron rocket, is scheduled to launch April 19.

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This is big news - getting around the Heisenberg uncertainty principle by measuring the position or momentum's periodic functions.
"Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, the fundamental impossibility of simultaneously measuring properties such as position and momentum, is at the heart of quantum theory. Physicists at ETH Zurich have now demonstrated an elegant way to relax this intrinsic incompatibility using a mechanical oscillator formed by a single trapped ion, opening up a route for fundamental studies and practical uses alike.

Heisenberg's uncertainty principle posits that there is a fundamental limit to the precision with which so-called complementary variables, such as position and momentum, can be measured. That is, the more accurately the speed and direction (and thus the momentum) of a quantum particle are known, the less certain we can be about its position. Remarkably, this intrinsic limitation can be relaxed when measurements extract periodic functions of position and momentum with a characteristic length and momentum scale, respectively. Simply put, the uncertainty in either variable can be spread out in broad, comb-like structures in which each tooth is still relatively sharp, thus enabling precise measurements in a limited range.

Christa Fluehmann and colleagues in the group of Jonathan Home in the Department of Physics at ETH Zurich have now explored the use of such modular position and momentum measurements to study the dynamical behaviour of a mechanical oscillator consisting of a single trapped ion. As they report in a paper that appeared online today in Physical Review X, they used sequences of multiple periodic position and momentum measurements—by varying the period, they could control whether or not one measurement disturbed the state of the following one. At specific values of the period, they found that such measurements can prevent disturbance, whereas other choices produced strong disturbance. The observation of disturbances is a signature that the single ion displays quantum-mechanical behaviour—for a classical oscillator, the modular measurements are expected to be always unperturbed."

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-04-easing-uncertainty.html
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I remember the first time I read about John Bell's theorem. It's still astonishing today. In short, he has proved that either signals travel faster than the speed of light, or 'something more weird' is going on. This is a good introductory article on the topic.
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