Shared publicly  - 
 
"But here’s the kicker, and the real lesson for you, dear reader: Netflix is going to die."
108
29
Pickles Zamboni's profile photoRony Lizardo's profile photoKevin Pojezny's profile photoStephanie Castillo de Quintero's profile photo
42 comments
 
Oh geez.  Tell that to Blockbuster.  I read the same sh*t about Netflix about 5 years ago.  Who won?  Also, try streaming from Amazon.  Most of it is crap and Netflix easily beats them.

Oh well, you needed to write an article today so might as well pick an attention grabbing headline.  MG does it all the damn time too.
 
Bah! Take your bad comeover,and your d-bag beard and go back to Hollywood. Netflix appears to be surviving just fine. Hollywood has a wake up call coming. You may make some of the content (not all anymore) but you are quickly losing your drivers seat.
 
Nice article! Food for thought. Netflix killed BlockBuster and Hollywood Video, RedBox fills the niche. Microsoft buyout of Netflix? Entirely possible.
 
what about netflix starting to produce their own content?
 
Business environments change and the nature of capitalism is adapt or die. It's always hard to compete against someone with deep enough pockets to buy whatever they need and survive thin margins indefinitely.
 
Are allot of us still subbed? Yes? Psh judgement gets attention, which is their jobs. Sensationalism 
 
Interesting food for thought.

I have noticed Netflix is a bit lite on movies, but great on TV Shows.

Currently I watch Nexflix for TV shows, and Redbox for movies.
 
Netflix needs a "sugar daddy."  They also need to start selling content a-la-carte.  The all-you-can-eat for $12 (or whatever it is now) is fine, but I'd also like to be able to buy a movie or TV show if it's not available in their craptastic selection of titles.
 
Sounds like someone's still mad about Netflix increasing their membership fee. Get over it. It's still cheap and it' ancient history. This article has all the holes of a fanboy rant.
 
Lmao. Once you called Amazon the biggest ad company, I knew this was a fanboy rant.
 
On the flip side - acquisition-wise - Netflix makes a lot of sense because they seem to be the only ones who have figured out the importance of ubiquity.  When I look at Hulu I see a broken story - blocking it's usage on set-top boxes etc.  When I look at Apple - I see a monoculture story - their content doesn't play nice anywhere but Apple.  When I look at Amazon's movie offering it's just been painful to do so.  And I'm still more likely to use Microsoft's own "Zune" movies feature on my 360 than I am to watch a movie rented from Google in spite of my phone and tablet both being Android driven.

But wait - Netflix works on all those devices...  My phone.  Check.  My tablet.  Check.  My laptop.  Check (although only cause I had Silverlight installed).  My game consoles (yes consoles).  Check.

Shame about that market cap though.  It'd be nice if it was about actually getting consumers what they want at a price that consumers are willing to swallow - instead of gouging and creating the illusion of scarcity through goofy, broken DRM schemes.  
 
Netflix is the only streaming service that my parents have heard of.  That has to mean something.
 
The author makes a lot of good points, and to be honest I've been considering dropping Netflix - except for the point that +Porter Woodward raised about ubiquity.  I actually really like Amazon Instant Video - tons of stuff streaming on Prime that I like to watch, and I can buy movies & TV shows I really want on streaming all through the same place.  The only problem is, there's no way for me to access that stuff on the go.  I have all Android devices, and there's no Android app for Amazon Instant Video.  If Amazon launched one, I'd probably cancel my Netflix subscription within days.
 
To change this leverage situation Netflix should be thinking about:

1) highlight their original content including any series that they might revive, such as Arrested Development.  this means place it in it's own que / row for browsing.  make it obvious that it's theirs.  I found Lillyhammer on accident.  didn't even know Netflix was doing that until after the fact.

2) offer a la carte rentals the same way Comcast On Demand / iTunes does.

After al la carte was up and running they would, ideally, turn their service in to a video locker.  Like Valve software's Steam for video games, but for movies and TV DVD's.  Offer to let people buy DVD's and stream them to all the devices that they already stream to.  For people with massive collections of physical media offer to let them mail in their DVD's (permanently) and get credit for each one that they turn in, having each one added to their library.  Offer a clause that says they will own the rights to a physical copy of the media in perpetuity, even if Netflix goes out of business)

With that level of security in the $ people are spending I could see only "buying" DVD's on Netflix and storing them in the cloud.  Netflix would be getting customers to lock in to their service the same way people are locked in to their iPhones because they've paid for so many apps.  THEN Netflix would have the leverage it needs as well as the customers AND be one of the only ones that is device agnostic and, thus, ubiquitous.
 
Netflix needs to expand their titles and maybe services. I think most of us can agree with that, but you write like Netflix insulted you personally. I don't expect anyone to unseat them as best known service anytime soon. Between the misleading title & the angry tone of the article, I can only conclude that you're a fan of another company. You could have just said "hey I like this company more" and saved us all a lot of time. 
 
This would be sad, if I had any loyalty to Netflix, but it's not like we're talking about the death of content publishing.
 
Their android app sucks so bad I cancelled my acct.
 
I'm too drunk to read this, will come. We back later, or when I actually think I care 
 
Bout time, Netflix is bad. Bad Netflix. Double charge you, refuse to reimburse, send you the wrong movie, claim you stole their stupid movie. Bad Netflix. 
 
I use netflix on my xbox every single day.. I havent had a single problem with it..
 
Coming from someone sounds like he is trying to pump up his recently purchased stock. How many jobs has this punk had in the last decade? The only thing that can hurt Netflix is a purchase by Microsoft.
 
As much as I'd like to, I really can't find a hole in this prediction. It's too bad, because I enjoy Netflix and I'd like to see it thrive. 
 
What a pointless article. This guy is such an idiot. Netflix streaming compared to amazon is a joke! Amazon instant is horrible and soooooo much more money! 
 
Lol. The fact is, Netflix content is poor, therefore cheap to purchase, therefore easily profitable. It's completely incomparable to cinemas.
 
Oh gees. I still see mom n pop video places around from time to time. Not to mention Blockbusters still jamming. Your numbers show companies that do much more then just video content.

What is the breakdown of just that? Ohhhhh you don't know do you???
 
I loved Netflix from day one. We got it in 2010. It was awesome. Streaming is what we did for the most part so we got rid of cable and lived off of it. It met our needs and again awesome service.
Then we moved. And 9 out of 10 blu-rays sent to our new address we're cracked. So thinking it was the way our mail was being handled, we started sending it to the work address. And no more cracked movies. Awesome we thought until the mail wasn't being picked up consistently enough so movies would be sitting a couple days without us having the chance to watch them.
We then changed that address back home and cracked blu-ray again. So we canceled. It is sad but we signed up for streampics and our needs seem to be getting met at the moment.
I miss it but they online streaming was lacking substance. Netflix got rid of the workouts and when Halloween came around I couldn't watch my favorite cult classic Halloween. It was surely a disappointment. 
 
My kids watch Netflix everyday, I think it's the reason we have it personally I use hulu + more
 
Revive those things that are dear to your heart
 
Netflix is the biggest player in vod and they are dying? I don't believe that. other large companies have seen the value of netflix services and are trying to compete. that is healthy. i do see the content war heating up but it is far too soon to declare winners. Hollywood is great and making money. who's to say they won't start selling rights to their content to all the big players? more money for Hollywood and happier consumers.

Sounds like this article is based more off the authors personal preferences. even labeling Google as an advertising company...
 
The fatal flaw of his reasoning is assuming that Netflix customers want primarily movies.

Most Netflix subscribers I know are cord cutters looking for quality TV shows.

Albeit studio controlled, TV is easier to monetize via subscription (ala HBO and the rest of high end content) and/ or ad rev.
 
+Jack Kutilek They tried that a few years ago with Red Envelope Media. They put out some damn good stuff, but it was still closed.
 
Netflix is great in regard TV shows, but their movie selection is horrible. It seems like the only movies they have, are either decades old or movies that did poorly in the box office and went straight to DVD. I have been a Netflix subscriber for going on 2 years I think, and the content has gotten worse and worse. 

Netflix needs to offer an on-demand option. If I could purchase new releases on-demand that would be great. They already have my CC number, come on.....but unless something changes soon--->I'll be leaving Netflix. 
 
Hollywood has all the power? The Pirate Bay might disagree with Armando Kirwin on that. I'm not necessarily endorsing getting everything for free, but the draconian shift in the distribution channels and pricing can largely be attributed to piracy. Big Content was forced to adjust, and thus the consumer market was changed forever.

It's an ongoing process of evolution for content providers. Shoot, even HBO is starting to bend. Offering non-bundled service in Europe is likely a trial run for what is to come. 
Add a comment...