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Tanya GOtravel
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Tanya Off the beaten track - trips, tricks and tips
Tanya Off the beaten track - trips, tricks and tips

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As new 2018 began, I learned what is the most modern wish for the year’s kick off – Be positive. It seems to me everyone is turning now to positivity and undoubtedly it’s a promising start. I wasn’t an exception and received lots of “be positive” instructions. But they are definitely not relevant to me, because 47 years ago I was born to be positive and there is a clear evidence of that. Being positive is literally in my blood and it’s not just a metaphorical expression. Much simpler than it seems – my own blood type is B+ (Be positive).

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That’s my first impression of Bahrain. I just went out of the airport and already felt banned. What strikes the eyes is the series of prohibitions and do not do things welcoming the guest upon arrival. This is a bit weird, because the vast majority of the expats believe Bahrain is the most liberal of all the gulf countries. I heard legends about the nightlife here, the casual dress code, no requirements of modest clothing, quite Westerner type of life, not strict limitation of alcohol – so my expectations were to pop up at a fairly free spirit island.

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Undoubtedly, December is the best month of the year for visiting Kuwait. Mild weather, spring to summer day temperatures (regarding the European standards), slight breeze, friendly sun, fresh greenery. The maximum day temperature reaches 22-24 C degrees, the minimum is about 12. It’s lovely staying outdoor – no fog, no haze, no dust.

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This morning I asked myself: “Why did I come to Kuwait?” The answer seemed to be simple – because I have never been there, so respectively I was curious to visit and explore it. It was surprising to realize that I have never asked myself this question before, wherever my journey brought me to. That’s my first morning in Kuwait.

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I was one of the closest witnesses of the heaviest flood for the last 60 years in Petra, Jordan. It was a smashing event, which left breathless even the native locals who are generally used to the floods in the area and experience two or three per year in the Valley of Moses (Wadi Musa).  It was November 9th , 2018 . It began as a quiet usual day in Petra, full of tourists, as November is peak season here, normally over crowded by foreigners.

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If I say, I was not interested in visiting Albania it would be false. On the contrary – Albania was already in my travel bucket list, but I did not have any plans (at all) to complete it in May, an extremely busy and hectic month for me. Albania came as a summer rain, popping up from nowhere. One of those weird journeys you get aware today you are going to travel to tomorrow. That’s what literally happened to me.

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In Petra the light is different. It changes non-stop and makes you feel as Alice in Wonderland. Everything here amazes – unearthly colours, sudden breeze in the middle of nowhere, timeless carvings, precise masterpieces, mysteriously looking bedouins, weird sounds, stunning bird eye views…No doubt, it’s a land with its own spirit, with a touching and energising background. Once experienced it, I am convinced Petra must be felt, not described. It firstly gives you courage, opens your eyes, drives all senses, challenges you and then pushes you to the limit.

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Three weeks in Paphos, Cyprus and I already have a new hobby. I daily started practicing to greet unknown people in the street. Why? Well, obviously I do it on purpose. My general impression of the locals is of grumpy, non-stop complaining, hard to please people, able to explode for no reason. They look somehow distant, in a hurry, overloaded by problems, never smile and never greet, while passing by. I understand – greeting unknown people is out of the local culture, but my aim is to brighten a bit this thunderous attitude.

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If I should describe the typical colour of Paphos, Cyprus, I would define it as “tired green”. It’s the association, which pops up in my mind when I look around. Lots of green, indeed, but mixed with dark yellow and brownish. The spot seems like a weird mixture of pre-desert environment and a tropical island. The blooming oleander and begonia bushes add an oriental pinky/red nuance, so the final impression is of an exotic piece of land, secluded in the South Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

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  I went to El Jem, Tunisia, just because it was included in the programme, arranged by the travel agency. My departure point was city of Sousse (the third most populated city in Tunisia), where our group was originally accommodated for a week stay. I had…
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