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About 60 percent of the ocean is a cold, dark region that spans down to 11,000 meters. This zone is known as the deep ocean, and though it seems like an inhospitable and remote corner of the planet, it is actually one of the greatest habitats on Earth. Lidia Lins explores how so many species thrive in this mysterious underwater world.
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How som many ocean 
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As we walk through our daily environments, we’re surrounded by exotic creatures that are too small to see with the naked eye. We usually imagine these microscopic organisms, or microbes, as asocial cells that float around by themselves. But, in reality, microbes gather by the millions to form vast communities. Scott Chimileski and Roberto Kolter describes how and why microbes create biofilms.
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love your content, production…
thank you...
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Often people make decisions that are not “rational” from a purely economical point of view — meaning that they don’t necessarily lead to the best result. Why is that? Are we just bad at dealing with numbers and odds? Or is there a psychological mechanism behind it? Sara Garofalo explains heuristics, problem-solving approaches based on previous experience and intuition rather than analysis.
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People were once rational. When everyone was both an introvert and an extrovert, both judging and perceiving, both intuition and sensing, and both thinking and feeling. But something happened and we evolved to be one type or the other. We are now unbalanced and make irrational decisions
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Your cell phone is mainly made of plastics and metals. It’s easy to appreciate the process by which those elements add up to something so useful. But there’s another story we don’t hear about -- how did we get our raw ingredients in the first place, from the chaotic tangle of materials that is nature? Iddo Magen uncovers the answer in a group of clever hacks known as separation techniques.
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Amazing yall should better watch the video It is very intiresting 
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Massive vines that blanket the southern United States, climbing high as they uproot trees and swallow buildings. A ravenous snake that is capable of devouring an alligator. Rabbit populations that eat themselves into starvation. These aren’t horror movie concepts – they’re real stories. But how could such situations exist in nature? Jennifer Klos gives the facts on invasive species.
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If you visit a museum with a collection of modern and contemporary art, you’re likely to see works that sometimes elicit the response, “My cat could make that, so how is it art?” But is it true? Could anyone create one of Jackson Pollock’s drip paintings? Sarah Rosenthal dives into the Abstract Expressionist movement in hopes of answering that question.
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No, not everyone can just create a Pollock. I have a degree in graphic design, but took extra painting classes for fun up to advanced painting 2. Pollock was the last artist I attempted to recreate prior to graduation, and if your flow is not correct, you end up with a mess, unappealing, and dirty looking (like a cat did it).
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Why can we find geometric shapes in the night sky? How can we know that at least two people in London have exactly the same number of hairs on their head? And why can patterns be found in just about any text — even Vanilla Ice lyrics? PatrickJMT describes the Ramsey theory, which states that given enough elements in a set or structure, some interesting pattern among them is guaranteed to emerge.
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When it was ratified in 1789, the US Constitution didn’t just institute a government by the people – it provided a way for the people to alter the Constitution itself. And yet, of the nearly 11,000 amendments proposed in the centuries since, only 27 have succeeded as of 2016. Peter Paccone explains why the US Constitution is so hard to change.
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excellent
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Can plants talk to each other? It certainly doesn’t seem that way: They don’t have complex sensory or nervous systems, like animals do, and they look pretty passive. But odd as it sounds, plants can communicate with each other — especially when they’re under attack. Richard Karban explains how.
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Soon vegans are going to have to look for something else to eat, since they don't condone the eating of other sentient beings.
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TED-Ed is TED's new education initiative.
Introduction
TED-Ed's mission is to capture and amplify the voices of great educators around the world. We do this by pairing extraordinary educators with talented animators to produce a new library of curiosity-igniting videos. Our site, ed.ted.com, features these new TED-Ed Originals as well as some powerful new learning tools.

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