Profile

Cover photo
Susan Kang Nam
Works at Cebisu Research
Attended Harvard University
6,590 followers|120,457 views
AboutPostsPhotos

Stream

Susan Kang Nam

Shared publicly  - 
 
Ello, Ello, #Ello

Let's start with the positives. What you are attempting to accomplish is commanding as I understand few have failed to do so before. To create a "social" network where users feel we are no longer a product. Where users no longer feel controlled by the ads in midst of our conversations. Where users feel free to write, post photos and share without being manipulated. However, how can there be "trust" when you have been backed by VC further claiming that there is no exit strategy? I don't buy it. What exactly is your business model? How will you fund your company further as I clearly do not see how you can afford to keep this going without further monetary help? What happens after potentially million users sign up? As a social media enthusiast and a user, I evaluate based on 1) Validity of your manifesto 2) User friendly and practicality of navigation esp mobile 3) How much I predict things will drastically change in your current policy as your site gets inundated with more users...data data and more data. Where is your transparency? And should I even begin to wonder about privacy as is there a such thing? Is everything really free? Where is the beauty your site attempts to claim? How is it simple? How are we "not" products if the site is already backed by a VC? VC = Exit. VC = Data. VC = Show me the $. I remain skeptical. Also, can you elaborate little more on the friends vs. noise? My first reaction was not so positive one. I can see so much friction and conflicts escalating from these labels. Do we really need to define ourselves that way? I'd figure all users will have to individually define what friends are vs. what noise are. Scoble has done pretty good job defining however there is always a gray area for friction. I thought you wanted to be different. How judgmental can we further get? What I value is this: I value genuine social connections...connections that will create a supportive community rather than speak in silo. I value sharing with like minded professionals...to help, encourage and support one another in whatever we aspire to accomplish. I am curious yet I am not curious enough unfortunately. Ello doesn't believe they are competing with Facebook or any other sites. Some claim that the site is like tumblr and twitter combined or the "new" google+ or even to say Ello competes with Medium? I don't see it. I hear your rant during your interviews via podcasts even via your quotes in various publications and I don't see "that" value just yet. Your premise is value based conversations that will win over privacy and commercialism? All I hope is that your site via your leadership team show the "example" as defined in your manifesto and be more transparent. Until then Ello..Ello...Ello nothing more truly but I wish all the best. Please prove me wrong as my initial gut reaction is to remain skeptical. Thank you for your time and further introducing this "value" based idea.
10
2
MHI HAFIJUL ISLAM's profile photosamuel ntshole's profile photoMarcus Ronaldi's profile photoMarkus Roder's profile photo
18 comments
 
Hey how r u doing I would love to be ur friend um in Africa in a country called Botswana and u can whatsapp me at 00267 74974220 or email me at samuelthapelontshole@gmail.com
Add a comment...

Susan Kang Nam

Shared publicly  - 
 
Inspiration for Geeks Page

/via +The Next Web Inspiration for Geeks #Pinterest Page

Very cute.. Maybe this Robot Tea Infuser will inspire me to drink more tea rather than coffee ; ) just about to have my 2nd cup of the day..

Are you on #Pinterest ~ if so why + how is it going? Just curious.. of soaring usage of brands there lately... any favorites?
12
2
Sueanne Shirzay's profile photoRoscoe Dunwoody's profile photo
 
Way cute! Pinterest is fun, here I am on it... http://pinterest.com/sueanneshirzay/
Add a comment...

Susan Kang Nam

Shared publicly  - 
8
1
‫تونسي فايق‬‎'s profile photo
Add a comment...

Susan Kang Nam

Shared publicly  - 
 
wonderful...
TheBicycleman79 originally shared:
 
Parable of Time Management

One day, an expert in time management was speaking to a group of business students and, to drive home a point, used an illustration those students will never forget. As he stood in front of the group of high-powered over-achievers he said, "Okay, time for a quiz" and he pulled out a one-gallon, wide-mouth mason jar and set it on the table in front of him. He also produced about a dozen fist-sized rocks and carefully placed them, one at a time, into the jar. When the jar was filled to the top and no more rocks would fit inside, he asked, "Is this jar full?" Everyone in the class yelled, "Yes." The time management expert replied, "Really?" He reached under the table and pulled out a bucket of gravel. He dumped some gravel in and shook the jar causing pieces of gravel to work themselves down into the spaces between the big rocks. He then asked the group once more, "Is the jar full?" By this time the class was on to him. "Probably not," one of them answered. "Good!" he replied. He reached under the table and brought out a bucket of sand. He started dumping the sand in the jar and it went into all of the spaces left between the rocks and the gravel. Once more he asked the question, "Is this jar full?" "No!" the class shouted. Once again he said, "Good." Then he grabbed a pitcher of water and began to pour it in until the jar was filled to the brim. Then he looked at the class and asked, "What is the point of this illustration?" One eager beaver raised his hand and said, "The point is, no matter how full your schedule is, if you try really hard you can always fit some more things in it!" "No," the speaker replied, "that's not the point. The truth this illustration teaches us is, "If you don't put the big rocks in first, you'll never get them in at all. What are the 'big rocks' in your life, time with loved ones, your faith, your education, your dreams, a worthy cause, teaching or mentoring others? Remember to put these BIG ROCKS in first or you'll never get them in at all. So, tonight, or in the morning, when you are reflecting on this short story, ask yourself this question, "What are the 'big rocks' in my life?" Then, put those in your jar first.
If this inspired you, share with others so they can benefit!
8
1
D Boyd's profile photo
Add a comment...

Susan Kang Nam

Shared publicly  - 
 
Back to personal basics 101 - Friday morning piano
Peaceful...

Chopin Etude No. 3, Op. 10

Source: Youtube Maurizio Pollini, #piano #chopin

Etude Op. 10 No. 3, in E major, is a solo piano work composed by Frédéric Chopin. This is a slow cantabile study, in which the right hand must maintain a singing tone in the melody whilst contributing to the accompaniment. This étude differs from most of Chopin's in its tempo. It marks a significant departure from the technical virtuosity required in études before Chopin's time. It concentrates on melodious phrasing and legato ambience of performance more than technical skill. It has been classified as a Tone Poem for piano by some critics, and is highly regarded as a quality manifestation of Chopin's love for Romantic Opera and Poland, where he was born.
5
1
julio david segura rojas's profile photoiswani anwar's profile photoLisa Kotecki's profile photo
2 comments
 
very beautiful piano, i wish i can play it
Add a comment...

Susan Kang Nam

Shared publicly  - 
 
The Next Web originally shared:
 
Wonderful quote from +Jason Calacanis
2 comments on original post
3
Sean Gardner's profile photo
 
So true!
Add a comment...
In her circles
273 people
Have her in circles
6,590 people
Jean Turner's profile photo
rognvaldr mackay's profile photo
Jessie Wilson's profile photo
Vladislav Milkov's profile photo
Sant Kumar's profile photo
hamo seka's profile photo
cherry Tranh Thêu's profile photo
vagrant ın love's profile photo
Putra Nenobahan's profile photo

Susan Kang Nam

Shared publicly  - 
 
How true.
Michelle Marie originally shared:
 
via: Julian Lennon
39 comments on original post
25
3
Interest Crunch's profile photoAjay Kumar Gupta's profile photoElizabeth Covino's profile photoOscar De La Villa Jr's profile photo
7 comments
 
So very true, Great quote =)...
Add a comment...

Susan Kang Nam

Shared publicly  - 
 
via Robert Safian - Editor of Fast Company and the author of this article

This is Generation Flux: Meet the Pioneers the new (and chaotic) frontier of business

(Career01_12) Food for thoughts

Are you GenFluxer? (or do we need this label? #GenFlux #Career )

Intrigued by topics of careers and those in transition mode as we continue to talk of innovation and future of business. This article I shared via Fast Company hit over 400 clicks (bitly), 50+ RTs + Fav on Twitter after Fast Company retweeted this couple of days ago. Have a moment to read it (also read through comments as well). FYI

In dealing with uncertainties: Few questions to think over.

Which competitive advantages have staying power?
What skills matter most?
How can you weigh risk and opportunity when the fundamentals of your business may change overnight?
But if your business is primed to be adaptable, flexible, and prepared for any shift in the economy, isn't it also primed to be whipsawed by constant change?

To flourish requires a new kind of openness. More than 150 years ago, Charles Darwin foreshadowed this era in his description of natural selection: "It is not the strongest of the species that survives; nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is most adaptable to change." As we traverse this treacherous, exciting bridge to tomorrow, there is no clearer message than that. - Robert Safian

How do you survive or thrive in this new time born of technology and globalization?

Thanks Tim J. Morton for your quote via twitter on this inspired this post.
"The comfort of yesterday, complacency of today and ignorance of tomorrow never ceases to astound me"
The future of business is pure chaos. Here’s how you can survive--and perhaps even thrive.
8
Rakesh bohat's profile photoCarol “Carrie” Yip's profile photo
 
Kya aap mere friend bnoge
Add a comment...

Susan Kang Nam

Shared publicly  - 
 
interesting.. meta-trend + social content curation
How Pinterest Will Transform the Web in 2012: Social Content Curation As The Next Big Thing. The most interesting wave hitting the social web in 2012 is social curation. This was kicked off in 2011 as...
5
Dedi Upay's profile photo
 
Pagi di hari Minggu yg berlibur
 ·  Translate
Add a comment...

Susan Kang Nam

Shared publicly  - 
 
+1000 :-)
Sascha Pallenberg originally shared:
 
true that!
142 comments on original post
10
2
Chris Brogan's profile photoAdrian Tuyu's profile photoErik Brown's profile photo
 
Protest! Yeahhh!!!!
Add a comment...

Susan Kang Nam

Shared publicly  - 
 
great interview with +David Eckoff and +Marissa Mayer
David Eckoff originally shared:
 
Good morning, G+ friends! Just posted video from my 1:1 interview with Google VP Marissa Mayer. We talk about topics related to innovation, new product development and entrepreneurship.

One of my favorite quotes: "The moment that you start a company is the moment when you won't take no for an answer."

This is from my 2007 interview, so some things like "20% time" have changed. But lot's of knowledge and insight shared that can be applied in any business.
1 comment on original post
4
1
omari ole melau's profile photoJohnny Roberts's profile photo
 
I like this ....
Add a comment...

Susan Kang Nam

Shared publicly  - 
 
On Technology Startups : Si Dawson, Paul Graham

So.. as I was engaging via #twitter early morning.. earlier than usual at the peak of dawn looking to engage in dialogues via various of conversations, one of my newest contact from New Zealand pretty much inspired me this morning after a quick discussion (less than an hour) however it was surprisingly valuable to me so I had to write this post and share it here. Si Dawson is a serial entrepreneur (currently CEO/founder of TwitCleaner, Advisor at Fruition Technologies), coder, former financial analyst from New Zealand. I inquired to start off with regards to challenges in startups and he shared his thoughts with me.

His insights:

1. Challenges: Maintaining Emotional State - Regardless of whether you're solo or in a team, everything is affected by your emotional state. decision making ability, productivity, ability to motivate, drive, interaction with customers, EVERYTHING. So, managing that state is critical.

2. Challenges: Self Management - Important because there's no-one to support you. So, up to you to pull yourself up by the bootstraps. As Paul Graham said "It's like being punched repeatedly in the face"

Source: (Si Dawson's LinkedIn profile) http://nz.linkedin.com/in/sidawson

Our discussions led to various of topics including Paul Graham. I appreciate Paul not only as an investor and an entrepreneur among others.. but through his writing you can gain plenty of insight and this post he wrote via stypi was great. He thoughts are indispensable and a must read I believe for startup founders and developers out there who would like to launch their own startups. Classic read FYI - for those that can't wait for stypi to see Paul's typing as it takes a while to see his writing in progress here is the version in plain text. Personally for me, it was fascinating to see his thought process via stypi as he completed these 13 sentences for a reporter.

Source: (Paul Graham) www.stypi.com/hacks/13sentences

Startups in 13 Sentences
by Paul Graham

One of the things I always tell startups is a principle I learned from Paul Buchheit: it's better to make a few people really happy than to make a lot of people semi-happy. I was saying recently to a reporter that if I could only tell startups 10 things, this would be one of them. Then I thought: what would the other 9 be?

When I made the list there turned out to be 13:

1. Pick good cofounders.

Cofounders are for a startup what location is for real estate. You can change anything about a house except where it is. In a startup you can change your idea easily, but changing your cofounders is hard. [1] And the success of a startup is almost always a function of its founders.


2. Launch fast.

The reason to launch fast is not so much that it's critical to get your product to market early, but that you haven't really started working on it till you've launched. Launching teaches you what you should have been building. Till you know that you're wasting your time. So the main value of whatever you launch with is as a pretext for engaging users.


3. Let your idea evolve.

This is the second half of launching fast. Launch fast and iterate. It's a big mistake to treat a startup as if it were merely a matter of implementing some brilliant initial idea. As in an essay, most of the ideas appear in the implementing.


4. Understand your users.

You can envision the wealth created by a startup as a rectangle, where one side is the number of users and the other is how much you improve their lives. [2] The second dimension is the one you have most control over. And indeed, the growth in the first will be driven by how well you do in the second. As in science, the hard part is not answering questions but asking them: the hard part is seeing something new that users lack. The better you understand them the better the odds of doing that. That's why so many successful startups make something the founders needed.


5. Better to make a few users love you than a lot ambivalent.

Ideally you want to make large numbers of users love you, but you can't expect to hit that right away. Initially you have to choose between satisfying all the needs of a subset of potential users, or satisfying a subset of the needs of all potential users. Take the first. It's easier to expand userwise than satisfactionwise. And perhaps more importantly, it's harder to lie to yourself. If you think you're 85% of the way to a great product, how do you know it's not 70%? Or 10%? Whereas it's easy to know how many users you have.


6. Offer surprisingly good customer service.

Customers are used to being maltreated. Most of the companies they deal with are quasi-monopolies that get away with atrocious customer service. Your own ideas about what's possible have been unconsciously lowered by such experiences. Try making your customer service not merely good, but startlingly good. Go out of your way to make people happy. They'll be overwhelmed; you'll see. In the earliest stages of a startup, it pays to offer customer service on a level that wouldn't scale, because it's a way of learning about your users.


7. You make what you measure.

I learned this one from Joe Kraus. [3] Merely measuring something has an uncanny tendency to improve it. If you want to make your user numbers go up, put a big piece of paper on your wall and every day plot the number of users. You'll be delighted when it goes up and disappointed when it goes down. Pretty soon you'll start noticing what makes the number go up, and you'll start to do more of that. Corollary: be careful what you measure.


8. Spend little.

I can't emphasize how important it is for a startup to be cheap. Most startups fail before they make something people want, and the most common form of failure is running out of money. So being cheap is (almost) interchangeable with iterating rapidly. [4] But it's more than that. A culture of cheapness keeps companies young in something like the way exercise keeps people young.


9. Get ramen profitable fast.

"Ramen profitable" means a startup makes just enough to pay the founders' living expenses. It's not rapid prototyping for business models (though it can be), but more a way of hacking the investment process. Once you cross over into ramen profitable, it completely changes your relationship with investors. It's also great for morale.


10. Avoid distractions.

Nothing kills startups like distractions. The worst type are those that pay money: day jobs, consulting, profitable side-projects. The startup may have more long-term potential, but you'll always interrupt working on it to answer calls from people paying you now. Paradoxically, fund-raising is this type of distraction, so try to minimize that too.


11. Don't get demoralized.

Though the immediate cause of death in a startup tends to be running out of money, the underlying cause is usually lack of focus. Either the company is run by stupid people (which can't be fixed with advice) or the people are smart but got demoralized. Starting a startup is a huge moral weight. Understand this and make a conscious effort not to be ground down by it, just as you'd be careful to bend at the knees when picking up a heavy box.


12. Don't give up.

Even if you get demoralized, don't give up. You can get surprisingly far by just not giving up. This isn't true in all fields. There are a lot of people who couldn't become good mathematicians no matter how long they persisted. But startups aren't like that. Sheer effort is usually enough, so long as you keep morphing your idea.


13. Deals fall through.

One of the most useful skills we learned from Viaweb was not getting our hopes up. We probably had 20 deals of various types fall through. After the first 10 or so we learned to treat deals as background processes that we should ignore till they terminated. It's very dangerous to morale to start to depend on deals closing, not just because they so often don't, but because it makes them less likely to.

Having gotten it down to 13 sentences, I asked myself which I'd choose if I could only keep one.


Understand your users. *That's the key. The essential task in a startup is to create wealth; the dimension of wealth you have most control over is how much you improve users' lives; and the hardest part of that is knowing what to make for them. Once you know what to make, it's mere effort to make it, and most decent hackers are capable of that.

Understanding your users is part of half the principles in this list. That's the reason to launch early, to understand your users. Evolving your idea is the embodiment of understanding your users. Understanding your users well will tend to push you toward making something that makes a few people deeply happy. The most important reason for having surprisingly good customer service is that it helps you understand your users. And understanding your users will even ensure your morale, because when everything else is collapsing around you, having just ten users who love you will keep you going.

Notes

[1] Strictly speaking it's impossible without a time machine.


[2] In practice it's more like a ragged comb.


[3] Joe thinks one of the founders of Hewlett Packard said it first, but he doesn't remember which.


[4] They'd be interchangeable if markets stood still. Since they don't, working twice as fast is better than having twice as much time.

Photo Source: from Si Dawson's old blog post: http://notabouthim.livejournal.com/
6
David Eckoff's profile photoSusan Kang Nam's profile photo
2 comments
 
you're so welcome +David Eckoff ~ yes re: his insight pretty inspiring.. I appreciate his work as well. BTW - it's been a while.. recall u from earlier Twitter days.. will catch up there as well. All the best.
Add a comment...
People
In her circles
273 people
Have her in circles
6,590 people
Jean Turner's profile photo
rognvaldr mackay's profile photo
Jessie Wilson's profile photo
Vladislav Milkov's profile photo
Sant Kumar's profile photo
hamo seka's profile photo
cherry Tranh Thêu's profile photo
vagrant ın love's profile photo
Putra Nenobahan's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Recruiter, Social Media and Tech Enthusiast, Attempt Disruptor in ISpace, Founder Cebisu Research
Employment
  • Cebisu Research
    Founder, present
  • Harvard University, Morgan Stanley Dean Witter, Genzyme, University of Rhode Island (CPRC), Brown University (Butler Hospital - Affiliate)
    Tech, Recruiter, Sourcer, Researcher, Sales etc.
  • Pink Olive Inc.
    via Family (sis Grace Kang , Founder/Chief buyer)
  • 1st Employer - American Red Cross
    Director of Volunteering Linking Program
  • For more information - Please see LinkedIn Profile
    http://www.linkedin.com/in/susankangnam
Basic Information
Gender
Female
Looking for
Networking
Story
Tagline
Searching for next disruptive emerging tech in mobile, Researching via incorporating Start-up Cebisu Research
Introduction
I'm an entrepreneur, student, recruiter and non-profit advocate who grew up in Asia and US and since 1994 (on/off) I've been using the world wide web exploring different platforms to engage in various of conversations. In mid 2008, I started to use Twitter among other various social media sites to build communities and explore various tribes in the area of recruiting, sourcing, retail and the technology space. Prior to this, I pursued higher education (worked and studied Clinical Psychology (PhD Program 1994-1996) at University of Rhode Island and Brown University and further my training in education at Teacher's College, Columbia (Summer of '97), Harvard University (HUGSE 2000-2001) as well as various of sourcing trainings via (ROI & AIRS - 2007 & 2010) after graduating with a BA in Psychology with studies in Music (Piano & Opera) at State University of New York Binghamton. Both my Senior Thesis and Masters Thesis studies were in the areas of Behavioral Medicine and Leadership. From 2006-2011, I helped out with my sister Grace's boutique "Pink Olive" from inception in various of tasks and opportunities to expand the business utilizing social media. She now has 3 stores in NYC area. Please find her company at pinkolive.com I also founded a Career Club - Boston Salty Legs Career Club with special nomination from ABC news Good Morning America Workforce Contributor back in late 2008 until early 2012.  Club's mission was to help each other to reflect and revisit our career paths together and to facilitate job search via sharing our networks.  
Bragging rights
When Jimmy Fallon DM me on Twitter ~ I was forever hooked on Twitter ;) there is nothing like edgy, witty comedians writing me back ;)
Education
  • Harvard University
    (Pursued) HUGSE Higher Administration, 2000 - 2001
  • Binghamton University (SUNY Binghamton / Harpur)
    B.A. Psychology, Studied Music (Piano, Opera), 1990 - 1994
  • University of Rhode Island
    (Pursued) Ph.D. Program Clinical Psychology, 1994 - 1996
  • Ridgewood High School
    H.S. Diploma, 1988 - 1990
  • Cupertino High School
    First 2 yrs High School, 1986 - 1988
Links
Contributor to
Links