Profile

Cover photo
Surat Lozowick
Worked at New Europe
Attended Yavapai College
Lives in San Francisco
68 followers|10,878 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube

Stream

Surat Lozowick

Shared publicly  - 
 
Last summer I set out on the streets of London to spread cheer through the universal language of high fives. Here's how it turned out. High Fives in London: Spreading cheer through the universal language of high fives
1
Surat Lozowick's profile photoIulian Dumitraşcu's profile photoTristan Cook's profile photoLola Casamitjana's profile photo
6 comments
 
So coool!
Add a comment...

Surat Lozowick

Shared publicly  - 
 
I wrote two recent pieces on social networking, with a focus on decentralized services. First, why I believe distributed social networks often fail:
http://suratlozowick.com/blog/2012/01/the-problem-with-decentralized-social-networks-like-diaspora/
Basically, most people don't want a decentralized, self-hosted network. Facebook’s appeal is that it’s a single, unified platform for everything. With that in mind, for any decentralized social network to succeed, the centrally hosted server is as important, maybe more so, than the distributed aspect.

In the second post, I talk about how the most important aspect of any networks is its users, and how effective integration and aggregation can be a shortcut to amassing a userbase:
http://suratlozowick.com/blog/2012/01/social-networks/
The value of any social network resides in its userbase. Quora and Reddit are great because of the quality and intelligence of the discussions on them, YouTube is successful because of the amount of v...
1
Add a comment...

Surat Lozowick

Shared publicly  - 
 
Even without personal search, Google is pushing Google+ beyond relevance. When I search "movies", I'm not looking for Hugh Jackman, The Muppets and IMDb, at least not their Google+ profiles. Then again, Google's really only hurting themselves, as Google+ profiles and pages are shown instead of ads.
1
Add a comment...

Surat Lozowick

Shared publicly  - 
 
"One of the twins admiringly touches my head. Before coming to wardrobe, I'd stopped in hair and makeup. My nape and temples are now shaved clean in an approximation of an old hairstyle called a half-box. All to help me blend in on the set. Only, from here on, I can no longer call it that. According to a glossary of forbidden terms posted right in front of me on the wall, the set is to be referred to as the Institute. Likewise, inside the Institute, there are no scenes, just experiments. No shooting, only documentation. And there is certainly no director. Instead, Ilya Khrzhanovsky, the man responsible for this madness, is to be referred to as the Head of the Institute or simply the Boss."
Movies + TV. The Movie Set That Ate Itself. Five years ago, a relatively unknown (and unhinged) director began one of the wildest experiments in film history. Armed with total creative control, he inv...
1
Add a comment...

Surat Lozowick

Shared publicly  - 
 
"Remix culture is the new Prohibition, with massive media companies as the lone voices calling for temperance. You can criminalize commonplace activities from law-abiding people, but eventually, something has to give." http://waxy.org/2011/12/no_copyright_intended/
1
Add a comment...

Surat Lozowick

Shared publicly  - 
 
My video on Occupy SF, focusing on the camp. Occupy SF at 101 Market St
1
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
68 people
Jeroen van der Werf's profile photo
Carson Cook's profile photo
DJ COLA's profile photo
anuj kumar's profile photo
Rae Thiebert's profile photo
Andy Carling's profile photo
Shersa Rajput's profile photo
Rami Lozowick's profile photo
Tashin Dieterich's profile photo

Surat Lozowick

Shared publicly  - 
 
Fascinating interview. http://www.wired.com/magazine/2012/02/ff_dysonqa/all/1 "You can’t predict how software will behave by inspecting it. The only way you can tell is to actually run it. And this fundamental unpredictability means you can never have a complete digital dictatorship with one government or company controlling our digital lives—not because of politics but because of mathematics. There will always be codes that do unpredictable things. This is why the digital universe will never be a national park; it will always be an undomesticated, unpredictable wilderness. And that should be reassuring to us."
1
Add a comment...

Surat Lozowick

Shared publicly  - 
 
"In the entire discussion, I've seen no discussion of credible evidence of this economic harm. There's no question in my mind that piracy exists, that people around the world are enjoying creative content without paying for it, and even that some criminals are profiting by redistributing it. But is there actual economic harm?"
Tim O'Reilly originally shared:
 
Before Solving a Problem, Make Sure You've Got the Right Problem

I was pleased to see the measured tone of the White House response to the citizen petition about #SOPA and #PIPA

https://wwws.whitehouse.gov/petitions#/!/response/combating-online-piracy-while-protecting-open-and-innovative-internet

and yet I found myself profoundly disturbed by something that seems to me to go to the root of the problem in Washington: the failure to correctly diagnose the problem we are trying to solve, but instead to accept, seemingly uncritically, the claims of various interest groups. The offending paragraph is as follows:

"Let us be clear—online piracy is a real problem that harms the American economy, and threatens jobs for significant numbers of middle class workers and hurts some of our nation's most creative and innovative companies and entrepreneurs. It harms everyone from struggling artists to production crews, and from startup social media companies to large movie studios. While we are strongly committed to the vigorous enforcement of intellectual property rights, existing tools are not strong enough to root out the worst online pirates beyond our borders."

In the entire discussion, I've seen no discussion of credible evidence of this economic harm. There's no question in my mind that piracy exists, that people around the world are enjoying creative content without paying for it, and even that some criminals are profiting by redistributing it. But is there actual economic harm?

In my experience at O'Reilly, the losses due to piracy are far outweighed by the benefits of the free flow of information, which makes the world richer, and develops new markets for legitimate content. Most of the people who are downloading unauthorized copies of O'Reilly books would never have paid us for them anyway; meanwhile, hundreds of thousands of others are buying content from us, many of them in countries that we were never able to do business with when our products were not available in digital form.

History shows us, again and again, that frontiers are lawless places, but that as they get richer and more settled, they join in the rule of law. American publishing, now the largest publishing industry in the world, began with piracy. (I have a post coming on that subject on Monday.)

Congress (and the White House) need to spend time thinking hard about how best to grow our economy - and that means being careful not to close off the frontier, or to harm those trying to settle it, in order to protect those who want to remain safe at home. British publishers could have come to America in the 19th century; they chose not to, and as a result, we grew our own indigenous publishing industry, which relied at first, in no small part, on pirating British and European works.

If the goal is really to support jobs and the American economy, internet "protectionism" is not the way to do it.

It is said (though I've not found the source) that Einstein once remarked that if given 60 minutes to save the world, he would spend 55 of them defining the problem. And defining the problem means collecting and studying real evidence, not the overblown claims of an industry that has fought the introduction of every new technology that has turned out, in the end, to grow their business rather than threaten it.

P.S. If Congress and the White House really want to fight pirates who are hurting the economy, they should be working to rein in patent trolls. There, the evidence of economic harm is clear, in multi-billion dollar transfers of wealth from companies building real products to those who have learned how to work the patent system while producing no value for consumers.

P. P.S. See also my previous piece on the subject of doing an independent investigation of the facts rather than just listening to the appeals of lobbyists, https://plus.google.com/107033731246200681024/posts/5Xd3VjFR8gx
1
Add a comment...

Surat Lozowick

Shared publicly  - 
 
Interesting day for technology news: Google takes its next step in social, Facebook takes its next step in advertising. http://www.techmeme.com/120110/p22#a120110p22
http://www.insidefacebook.com/2012/01/10/breaking-sponsored-stories-begin-to-appear-in-news-feed/
This story, by Amit Singhal / The Official Google Blog, appeared on Techmeme.
1
Add a comment...

Surat Lozowick

Shared publicly  - 
 
My extensive interview with Notational Velocity developer Zachary Schneirov
http://suratlozowick.com/blog/2011/12/notational-velocity-developer-zachary-schneirov-interview/ "In the end, the need for profit can only ever add unnecessary and unwanted side-effects to our medium of communication, whether it’s omnipresent and invisible tracking of everything we read and say, a visual landscape overrun with advertisements, or software that disappears and takes our data with it once we stop paying rent. The 'cloud' model is becoming popular first and foremost because it enables new forms of profit. However with just a tiny amount of work and responsibility, we can make the Cloud’s few advantages redundant, re-possess our information, and finally move to an era of worldwide, decentralized, participatory digital democracy."
An interview with Notational Velocity developer Zachary Schneirov. For those who use it, Notational Velocity needs no introduction (and for those who don't, trying it out is the best way to really...
1
1
Sylvain Soliman's profile photo
Add a comment...

Surat Lozowick

Shared publicly  - 
 
Back in May, while laying in bed failing to sleep, I realized an interesting contradiction of the trend in computing/digital minimalism: computers are intentionally excessive. They're designed to do as much as possible — ideally, the user will never meet their limits. Whereas minimalism is the opposite — finding one's lower limit out of endless needs and wants. I got out of bed and feverishly pounded out some stream-of-consciousness thoughts, finished it up the next day with a conclusion about my relationship to technology, and I've been tweaking it slightly ever since. I finally got around to publishing it.
1
Add a comment...

Surat Lozowick

Shared publicly  - 
 
"If you're not willing to face the abyss of choice, you will almost certainly not spend enough time dancing with opportunity." -Seth Godin
1
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
68 people
Jeroen van der Werf's profile photo
Carson Cook's profile photo
DJ COLA's profile photo
anuj kumar's profile photo
Rae Thiebert's profile photo
Andy Carling's profile photo
Shersa Rajput's profile photo
Rami Lozowick's profile photo
Tashin Dieterich's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Writer, Traveler, Journalist, Student.
Employment
  • New Europe
    Intern, 2011 - 2011
  • YC Rough Writer
    Assistant Editor, Web Editor, 2008 - 2010
  • Soma Exquisite Chocolate Truffles
    Truffle Maker, Kitchen Manager, Salesman, 2006 - 2010
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
San Francisco
Previously
Prescott, Arizona - Brussels, Belgium - France
Links
Contributor to
Story
Tagline
Creative unprofessional.
Bragging rights
Traveled to 5 continents, climbed Kilimanjaro.
Education
  • Yavapai College
    Journalism
  • Vesalius College
    Communication, 2010 - 2011
Basic Information
Gender
Male