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Sue Frederick
Works at www.CareerIntuitive.org
Attended Convent of Mercy High School
Lives in Colorado
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Sue Frederick

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Become a Professional Certified Intuitive Coach this weekend. Whether you're already a coach/therapist and want to add this to your tools for helping clients or are simply ready to own your intuition and use it for navigating your life, you'll love this training! We have two slots left...
https://t.e2ma.net/webview/bzaryd/a0f1a238d1aba4ad018365ceab8d1bf2
www.SueFrederick.com Growth and change ARE required here. When you embrace change, trust your intuition rather than your logic mind, and gracefully step up to the next level, your life gets better and better. You’re being asked to grow, to love what you fear, to embrace pain as your greatest gift. You’re not flawed. There’s nothing wrong with you. You’re a divine being who came here with a plan. You may have lost your way but that’s what happens ...
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Sue Frederick

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Because I couldn’t see the logic of not jumping off the cliff and instead felt, with all my heart, that the jump must be made, I took the leap; it was the leap that changed everything and brought me into the glory of a luminous world that lives within everyone and everything.
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Sue Frederick

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It was 35 years ago today that I held my husband Paul Frederick in my arms as he took his final breath. I watched his radiant spirit gently leave his body and fly out the window to play in a warm July thunderstorm. I'm grateful for every painful and joyful moment of my soul agreement with Paul; he launched me on my greatest spiritual adventure which has brought me to a more meaningful and love-filled life than I could have ever imagined. Today I prepare to fly back to my childhood home to visit my 89-year-old mom who fell in her driveway and may soon be crossing over. I'm profoundly aware of how my departed dad is orchestrating her graceful exit. For my comforting awareness of divine order, I thank Paul Frederick whose early exit awakened me to the unexpected beauty within every painful moment.
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Sue Frederick

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I’ll never forget my initiation into cliff jumping, as dozens of cold and terrified people just like me lined up to take our turns running and jumping off a cliff that clearly lead to a hideous death far below (either smashed against the rocky shore if we did not leap far enough or drowning in the tumbling waves of the deep blue sea). I was trembling and nauseous with fear as I got closer to the front of the line. But my wise instructor whispered: “Don’t think. Just run and jump. Feel the fear and do it anyway.” READ MORE...
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Right away, my mind settles down. Instantly, my father is vividly in front of me, laughing and being goofy. He’s young and healthy. I’m delighted to see him happy and animated. This image is so real and tangible, that I smile and say playfully, “Dad, what are you doing here?”
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Sue Frederick

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For six months, my father had terrible back pain that no one could diagnose. Doctors poked, prodded, and scanned, and found nothing. “You’re just depressed,” said my brothers. “You need to exercise,” said the doctor.

I lived miles away in Colorado yet from weekly phone calls, I knew there was something more going on. I knew he was dying. On the phone one Sunday I asked, “So dad, do you think you’re dying?”

“Yes I do,” was his heart-breaking, honest answer. I made plans to fly home. Seventeen years earlier, my husband Paul had died and I had relied heavily on my dad’s love since then, often saying, “You can’t ever die dad. I need you here with me.” And he was always there for me. I knew that if it was his time to go now, I had to release him. So I sat down and wrote a letter.

In a heart-felt letter I told him how much I loved him, what a great dad he was, and that I would be okay if he needed to go now. I said I would love him forever and we’d always be connected and would find each other in the other realms. It was the hardest letter I ever wrote.

On the day he received it, my brother told me that he read the letter and left the office for the day. I can only imagine he was coming to terms with his own death—even though no one, especially the doctors, agreed that anything was wrong with him.

I hadn’t seen my dad for six months and when I arrived home, I knew instantly. He was gaunt and tired; I’d seen that look before. We sat in the sunroom and talked. He cried to me in whispers, not wanting to upset my mom. “It’s okay dad. Everyone will be okay…” I tried to comfort him as he had always comforted me.

The next day, doctors performed a new test and found a tumor hidden behind his heart. They gave him a few weeks to live. I spent the first night after that diagnosis sitting with him in the hospital bed reminiscing. He didn’t want to talk about the cancer, the treatments, or the family—he just wanted to remember his New Orleans childhood. I was a willing partner for the process.

In the morning, after spending the entire night holding hands, listening to his memories, regrets, and unfinished dreams, he told me that our talk had meant everything to him and that now he was at peace.

This was how the evening unfolded as we sat in the hospital bed holding hands and watching his favorite TV rerun of The Cosby Show:

“I was so lucky,” he said softly above the din of audience laughter coming from the TV. “I really had a great childhood.”

“You did,” I whispered. “Your family was wonderful —brilliant and funny...it doesn’t get better than that.”
My dad closed his eyes to remember: “We knew everybody in Algiers. There was always a gang of kids to play with. People spent their evenings on their front porches talking to each other. They’d say, ‘Hey Tommy! Tell your mother hello!’ Or they’d tell me I should get home for dinner.”

He continued: “Did I tell you how we took the ferry across the river every morning to go to school? There’d be a taxi waiting on the other side. Sometimes we’d squeeze ten kids into that taxi…”

We both laughed and then my dad was silent for a while as the Cosby show continued. Finally he spoke again: “One summer when I was a kid, my father came home with train tickets for the whole family. He told us to each pack one small bag of clothes. The next day we got on the train and spent three months traveling the country. I’ll never forget it.”

“And Long Beach,” he continued. “Long Beach was heaven.” Now his eyes tear up and neither of us says anything.

Long Beach, Mississippi, was my family’s nirvana. It’s where my great grandfather bought coastal property and built two identical family homes separated by an oyster shell driveway. A huge water oak with low hanging mossy branches stood at the entrance to the drive, a babbling creek ran behind the property, a sugar-cane field grew next door, and a white sandy beach stretched in front of us as far as we could see.

The warm Gulf water was shallow and calm, perfect for long afternoons fishing and swimming. We could walk half a mile out before the water got deep, and there were fresh water springs that bubbled up impossibly from the sand bars at low tide. We drank straight from those springs nearly every day, pressing our cheeks hard against the sand to sip the freezing water. It was like a dream, impossible and yet real—until 1969.

Hurricane Camille took it all away, leaving only two concrete slabs where our homes had once stood. Dishtowels hung from the tallest trees—remnants of sacred ground that had once housed our entire extended family every summer. My grandfather had a stroke and died shortly after. My grandmother developed dementia. My dad never got over it. I left for college soon afterwards and never returned. Hurricane Camille scattered our family in every direction.

“I’m so sorry, Dad,” I say. “I wish it had never happened.”

There’s a long silence while we watch TV and then he says: “You know I really wanted to be a jazz pianist in the French Quarter. That’s what I really wanted to do with my life—either that or become a priest.” We both laugh.

“Why did you become an engineer?” I ask.

“Everybody wanted to be an engineer back then. I worked on ship engines during the war. I never looked back.”

“You’re the best dad in the world,” I whisper. “We had a great childhood because of you.”

“When I think of all the golf games I was going to play and all the fishing trips I was going to take….” He grows quiet. Occasionally he shares another memory and we talk about it.

As the sun begins to rise outside our window, Dad asks me what I believe in spiritually. He raised us Catholic, but he knows that I’ve since pursued other spiritual paths and that I meditate every day.

I gently try to share my view of the divine realms, reincarnation, soul mate agreements, karma, and the ongoing journey of our souls’ evolution. He listens intently.

“I know you’re very spiritual and that you’re a good person, but it worries me that you’re no longer Catholic. I know where I’m going when I die, and I want you to be there too.”
“We’ll find each other Dad. I promise.”

He explains that he wants to talk to the priest the next day and confess his sins. He wants me to do the same so that I’ll be with him in heaven eventually. I agree to do this knowing that it will give him peace and help him let go.

Eventually he dozes in and out of a restless sleep.

In the morning, they take him downstairs for a medical procedure, and he never fully recovers except for brief conversations with family members and with the priest. He’s gone in three weeks.

As a child, I had the gift of clairvoyance. When I woke up screaming in the night, unable to fully bring myself back into this realm, my dad would walk with me, holding me on his shoulders, pointing to the nursery rhyme characters on the wall to bring me back here and calm my fears. 

When I was older and still having those nighttime episodes, my father would have me sit beside him to watch Johnny Carson until my world came back into focus and I was no longer stuck between the realms.

Now, I become his guide to the other realms—helping him release his past and slip through the thin veil between the worlds.

From my book: Bridges to Heaven: True Stories of Loved Ones on the Other Side
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Sue Frederick

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Remember, it takes baby steps to climb any mountain. You may see what you came here to do and the greatness of it may overwhelm you. You need to focus on what’s right in front of you today and ask, “What is one small step can take today that will begin to turn my life in this new direction?” If you ask that question everyday and keep moving forward with little steps, you will arrive where you’re meant to be – doing your great work.
From my book Your Divine Lens
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Sue Frederick

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I lived miles away in Colorado yet from weekly phone calls, I knew there was something more going on. I knew he was dying. On the phone one Sunday I asked, “So dad, do you think you’re dying?”

“Yes I do,” was his heart-breaking, honest answer. I made plans to fly home. Seventeen years earlier, my husband Paul had died and I had relied heavily on my dad’s love since then, often saying, “You can’t ever die dad. I need you here with me.” And he was always there for me. I knew that if it was his time to go now, I had to release him. So I sat down and wrote a letter.
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Sue Frederick

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Become part of our grief healing community when you join our Grief Intuitive Coach Training webinar June 26 & 27. You'll become a Professional Certified Grief Intuitive Coach. This training webinar is profoundly healing for all attendees -- whether you've lost someone you love years ago or recently.
Sign up here:
https://www.regonline.com/Register/Checkin.aspx?EventID=1709581


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It's my old relentless question of why do good people often take the path of suffering before they die? That one painful question launched my spiritual exploration journey in the 80s. And it still fuels the work I do today.
https://t.e2ma.net/webview/zxpkyd/fa2d6f8133d931a6796c755f6d894df2
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Sue Frederick

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I'm so heart opened from this weekend's 35+ year reunion of our group of friends. We met in the early 70s to create a new community, an organic sustainable farm to build our homes on. Together we explored spirituality, intentional community and sustainable living before any of those were a "thing." I'm so honored to have made those choices and befriended those brilliant good souls. Today the son of one of our people is making it happen. He has built hay bale houses, created solar power and built an amazing garden. He's hoping to create dried Shitake mushrooms as a cash crop. He's awesome. Tao Weilundemo we love you! And seeing these old friends after all these years has meant more to me than you can imagine.
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Kiki McCleary's profile photo
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Carrie Jordan's profile photo
Lisa Maynard's profile photo
Tree of Life Counseling's profile photo
Julie Halperin's profile photo
Teresia Rose Reed's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Sue Frederick is the author of Bridges to Heaven: True Stories of Loved Ones on the Other Side; I See Your Dream Job & I See Your Soul Mate. An intuitive since childhood, Sue draws upon dreams, ancient numerology, powerful intuition, and conversations with spirits to help her clients fulfill their soul's mission and use their pain as inspiration for a meaningful life. Her work has been featured in the New York Times, CNN.com, Real Simple, Yoga Journal and Natural Health Magazines. Sue has trained more than 500 intuitive coaches around the world and she's been a guest on more than 200 radio and TV shows. Www.SueFrederick.com
Employment
  • www.CareerIntuitive.org
    Career Intuitive, Grief Intuitive, Author & Soul Mate Intuitive, 2003 - present
    I use my powerful intuition to guide people to their great work, to help them navigate love, and through their many reinvention cycles. My books and private sessions help grieving people connect to their departed loved ones on the other side for guidance and healing. http://www.SueFrederick.com
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Colorado
Story
Tagline
Best-selling author of I See Your Dream Job & Bridges to Heaven; True Stories of Loved Ones on the Other Side
Introduction
I'm a life-long intuitive and best-selling author of 3 books: Bridges to Heaven - True Stories of Loved Ones on the Other Side; I See Your Dream Job & I See Your Soul Mate. My private sessions and workshops will help you find your true work and your true love - and heal your grief by connecting to your departed loved ones. http://www.SueFrederick.com
Education
  • Convent of Mercy High School
    1965 - 1969
  • University of Missouri
    Psychology, 1969 - 1978
  • University of Colorado at Boulder
    Journalism, 1981 - 1982
Sue Frederick's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Feel the Fear and Do It Anyway
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His departed mom told him to help me…
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A Million Shards of Light
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You need partners and friends whose conversations leave you feeling uplifted and inspired to do something bigger and make a difference. Your

All that’s required of you in the moment of anger…
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Ego Lens or Divine Lens?
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The most wonderful thing about being human is our ability to choose. In this earthly realm, we’re allowed to experience the perfect combinat

This grief is your moment of reinvention... | Sue Frederick | LinkedIn
www.linkedin.com

This grief is your moment of reinvention. You need partners and friends whose conversations leave you feeling uplifted and inspired to do so

All that's required of you in the moment of anger... | Sue Frederick | L...
www.linkedin.com

Anger: A Distortion of the Ego LensLook at this lost and pained soul standing before you who has just hurt you, acted from their ego self, a

Ego Lens or Divine Lens? You get to choose... | Sue Frederick | LinkedIn
www.linkedin.com

The most wonderful thing about being human is our ability to choose. In this earthly realm, we’re allowed to experience the perfect combinat

Our Permanent Impermanence: Riding the Waves | LinkedIn
www.linkedin.com

We want to believe that everything lasts. We last. Our loved ones last. Our jobs last. That what we feel today is forever.But it’s more like

You Already Know How This Ends... | LinkedIn
www.linkedin.com

You already know how this ends. You know that in the end you will be fully revealed as who you came to be and you hope that this revelation

You're Being Blessed at this Moment... | LinkedIn
www.linkedin.com

When bad news first arrives, it feels like the wind has been knocked out of you; it’s a punch to the gut. This moment is a great blessing. T

Cultural shifts and brain scans: Is searching for spirituality the new A...
religion.blogs.cnn.com

By Jessica Ravitz, CNN (CNN) -- To discover one’s self. To find enlightenment. To take a spiritual journey. What does this language mean? Ar

Find Your Life’s Mission
careerintuitive.info

Listen into this powerful interview hosted by Spiritual Happy Hour to discover the amazing power hidden inside you waiting to be unleashed.

Because I Couldn't See the Logic of Not Jumping... | LinkedIn
www.linkedin.com

Because I couldn’t see the logic of not jumping off the cliff and instead felt, with all my heart, that the jump must be made, I took the le

I Love You
careerintuitive.info

Thank you, fear, for being such a powerful teacher, for waking me at night with heart tremors, for unplugging me from my source, for taking

You’re Being Blessed at this Very Moment
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When bad news first arrives, it feels like the wind has been knocked out of you; it’s a punch to the gut. This moment is a great blessing. T