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Sustainable Design | Development Consultant |TridiPanel Design | Green Construction | SCIP Technology | Design-Build | EcoHomes |
Sustainable Design | Development Consultant |TridiPanel Design | Green Construction | SCIP Technology | Design-Build | EcoHomes |

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THE BUTTERFLY ROOFS ARE THE MOTOR OF THE CO2-NEUTRAL HI'ILANI ECOHOUSE, PROVIDING WATER - ELECTRICITY & PASSIVE AIRCO FOR THE HOUSE.

The butterfly roofs at the Hi'ilani Ecohouse have many functions. They harvest the water for the home, which has no connection to an outside water supply.

They house 2 solar arrays. The large array provides the house with 120 V power, a smaller array provides 12v DC to run the computer system, all mobile phones, etc. There are no transformers in the house for cellphones, laptops etc. You just plug into a 12v DC port. The 12v DC system is also used to operate the motorized louvers for the ventilation system.

The 120V solar array also pressurized and filters the rainwater which is captured in a 28,000-gallon storage tank in front of the house. The filtered water is run again over the roof to be solar heated before it is distributed into the house. There is a small electrical heating back up for cloudy days.

The location of the house can provide a water supply which is 100% rainwater dependable and after use by the inhabitants the water is simply returned to the earth to feed the gardens.

The wing-shaped roofs are purposely oriented on the trade winds, so the Bernoulli Effect (same as for airplane wings) creates a constant suction through the house and acts as a passive ventilation motor. Motorized louvers adjust the airflow controlled by a computerized climate control system.

The ceilings at the house are high, allowing nighttime chill to flow through under the ceiling, made of insulated concrete, where the chill is stored to aid cooling the house in the next hot day. The entire cooling system is operated by the automatic control of the motorized louvers.

The Hi'ilani Ecohouse is entirely built with SCIP panels.

#SCIP panels
#Tridipanel

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LEE ARSENAULT HAS BEEN LOOKING FOR BETTER WAYS TO BUILD A HOME FOR 30 YEARS

“I’m a construction geek,” said Arsenault, the president of New Leaf Construction. “I love doing things that are better and I love making things that last longer.”

So it makes sense that Arsenault would be the first builder in Northeast Florida to build homes using structural concrete-insulated panel components, or SCIPs.

A SCIP is a lightweight panel of foam surrounded by wire mesh that is faced on both sides with concrete during installation. Hurricane-resistant, energy-efficient and waterproof, SCIP construction has been used for more than 40 years in Europe and Latin America, but is new in this area.

As general contractor for national homebuilder elecora, Arsenault will include a SCIP home as one of the options in Madeira, a master-planned community near St. Augustine.

The introduction of SCIP to the market also kicks off Durabild Solutions Inc., a Westside firm that will supply the components and provide installation services to residential and commercial builders in the Jacksonville area.

Jim Arsenault, a former business developer for commercial construction and brother of Lee Arsenault, is president of Durabild.

“I think people, especially engineering-types, are going to fall in love with this,” he said. “It’s a house that will last forever.”

The lightweight SCIP panel is made up of an expanded polystyrene core, sandwiched between two layers of galvanized steel wire mesh. At the jobsite, a high-strength 4,000-per-square-inch mortar is sprayed onto each side of the panels to create concrete walls, slabs, and roofs.

It creates a tight building envelope, which means homes can use a smaller A/C system and utility bills are lower. It also creates an almost monolithic structure.

Lee Arsenault, like most homebuilders, constructs wood-frame houses. But the homes need re-caulking and painting at regular intervals. Without maintenance, water intrusion will undermine the structure.

Arsenault has been interested in SCIP since 2000. When it comes to performance, two images stick in his mind.

The first is a photo he saw of a SCIP home where the ground underneath the front end had eroded for a distance of about six feet. The slab didn’t crack.

The other is a video of an air-cannon test with two-by-fours shot at a SCIP wall at 35 miles per hour. The concrete shattered at the outside point of impact, but the boards didn’t go through.

The SCIP panels cost $2-$6 per square foot before concrete is added, depending on the thickness used.

“Typically we are a little bit more expensive than conventional building,” said Scott Miller of Gulf Concrete Technology, which manufactures the panels. “But, with the right design, it can be very competitive to standard construction.”

That’s because SCIPs, once the concrete is sprayed, produce a finished wall system. It’s not necessary to sheathe the outside or add another finish material to the inside. It works like a masonry wall.

Cost and style are two factors Lee Arsenault will study when he builds his first SCIP home in Madeira.

“We think the cost will be close to concrete block, but we’d like it to be closer to wood framing,” he said.

If it’s within $10,000 of other types of construction, Arsenault thinks the market will support it.

For the model, Arsenault will stick with a concrete finish on the outside, but he will add a drywall finish on the inside, something he admits will boost costs.

Concrete interior finishes were prevalent in the 1950s, he said. It was an old-school finish that lent easily to plastering or other types of finishes added later. But, Arsenault doesn’t know if consumers will accept it today.

“It’s always the dilemma in building — how to make things that are affordable, but durable,” he said. “It seems we’re always fighting that battle.”

chawkins@realty-builder.com

(904) 356-2466

https://www.jaxdailyrecord.com/article/building-concrete-house-last-forever
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THE BUTTERFLY ROOFS ARE THE MOTOR OF THE CO2-NEUTRAL HI'ILANI ECOHOUSE, PROVIDING WATER - ELECTRICITY & PASSIVE AIRCO FOR THE HOUSE.

The butterfly roofs at the Hi'ilani Ecohouse have many functions. They harvest the water for the home, which has no connection to an outside water supply.

They house 2 solar arrays. The large array provides the house with 120 V power, a smaller array provides 12v DC to run the computer system, all mobile phones, etc. There are no transformers in the house for cellphones, laptops etc. You just plug into a 12v DC port. The 12v DC system is also used to operate the motorized louvers for the ventilation system.

The 120V solar array also pressurized and filters the rainwater which is captured in a 28,000-gallon storage tank in front of the house. The filtered water is run again over the roof to be solar heated before it is distributed into the house. There is a small electrical heating back up for cloudy days.

The location of the house can provide a water supply which is 100% rainwater dependable and after use by the inhabitants the water is simply returned to the earth to feed the gardens.

The wing-shaped roofs are purposely oriented on the trade winds, so the Bernoulli Effect (same as for airplane wings) creates a constant suction through the house and acts as a passive ventilation motor. Motorized louvers adjust the airflow controlled by a computerized climate control system.

The ceilings at the house are high, allowing nighttime chill to flow through under the ceiling, made of insulated concrete, where the chill is stored to aid cooling the house in the next hot day. The entire cooling system is operated by the automatic control of the motorized louvers.

The Hi'ilani Ecohouse is entirely built with SCIP panels.

#SCIP panels
#Tridipanel

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