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Stephen Shankland
656,361 followers -
CNET News reporter, covering technology trends, Web and browser developments, and digital photography.
CNET News reporter, covering technology trends, Web and browser developments, and digital photography.

656,361 followers
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For years, Google Docs, Sheets and Slides have worked on Chrome even when you don't have a network connection. At long last, that ability is coming to Mozilla Firefox and Microsoft Edge browsers, too, courtesy of new progressive web app and Service Worker web technology.

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Google's Guetzli project is designed to shrink JPEG images as much as possible without plaguing them with compression artifacts. You could lose some color, though, and too bad it's so slow.

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The Android version of Google Chrome now looks for things on the "physical web" — Bluetooth-beaming devices that share a web address for some kind of interaction.

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Facebook won't do it. Nor will WhatsApp, Snapchat, or Instagram. But now Google does: allow accounts for kids under 12. Meet Family Link, a parental control app for Android that lets parents set limits for kids with Android phones. That means Gmail for your preteen no longer violates Google's terms of service.

https://www.cnet.com/news/google-family-link-children-parent-users-android/
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The data throughput of trucks carrying hard drives (or in the old days, magnetic tapes) is still impressive. The newest incarnation of the idea: Amazon #AWS 100TB Snowball Edge.

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It doesn't get any smaller than this: IBM Research now can store data on a single atom. The atomic-scale computing vision of famed physicist Richard Feynman is coming true, though it's far from practical at this stage.

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Qubits and entanglement and superposition are weird. A computer that only works when cooled to a lower temperature than deep space is difficult. But quantum computing is real. IBM is now making a business out of the technology, not just a research project.

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Now with built-in HDR shooting using raw photos, Adobe's newest Lightroom for Android and iOS takes a big step forward. In my testing it's very useful, if not perfect. But it only works on a few higher-end iPhones and Android phones for now.

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Would you pay to use the world's most baffling technology? A few companies are as IBM Research's quantum computers fledge into a real business. It's only very early stages right now, though, as IBM tries to figure out how to build and run these super-chilled, exotic machines.

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Another way to squirt tiny little cubesats into space: Richard Branson's new Virgin Orbit spinoff. Yes, they launch rockets by dropping them from a jet at 35,000 feet.
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