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Stephen Macknik
Works at SUNY Downstate Medical Center
Attended Harvard University
Lives in Brooklyn, NY
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Stephen Macknik

Member Posts  - 
 
Salvador Dalí always thought of himself as a replacement for his older brother, who had died before the famous painter was born. Dalí’s theory is strengthened by the fact that his older brother had also been named Salvador. That’s creepy. We’re not certain if his art was a form of therapy, but it could explain some of his weird (and wonderful!) ideas. It is perhaps not surprising that double interpretations and images abound in Dali’s art.  Our new Illusions column in Scientific American: Mind, out this month, focuses on Dalí’s Doubles.  http://ow.ly/QSPMa See more of the the artistic repercussions @illusionchasers http://ow.ly/QSPGO 
Haunted by a deceased brother, whom he saw as a twin, the Spanish artist filled his work with double meanings
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Stephen Macknik

Discussion  - 
 
Salvador Dalí always thought of himself as a replacement for his older brother, who had died before the famous painter was born. Dalí’s theory is strengthened by the fact that his older brother had also been named Salvador. That’s creepy. We’re not certain if his art was a form of therapy, but it could explain some of his weird (and wonderful!) ideas. It is perhaps not surprising that double interpretations and images abound in Dali’s art.  Our new Illusions column in Scientific American: Mind, out this month, focuses on Dalí’s Doubles.  http://ow.ly/QSPMa See more of the the artistic repercussions @illusionchasers http://ow.ly/QSPGO 
Haunted by a deceased brother, whom he saw as a twin, the Spanish artist filled his work with double meanings
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Stephen Macknik

Discussion  - 
 
Salvador Dalí always thought of himself as a replacement for his older brother, who had died before the famous painter was born. Dalí’s theory is strengthened by the fact that his older brother had also been named Salvador. That’s creepy. We’re not certain if his art was a form of therapy, but it could explain some of his weird (and wonderful!) ideas. It is perhaps not surprising that double interpretations and images abound in Dali’s art.  Our new Illusions column in Scientific American: Mind, out this month, focuses on Dalí’s Doubles.  http://ow.ly/QSPMa See more of the the artistic repercussions @illusionchasers http://ow.ly/QSPGO 
Haunted by a deceased brother, whom he saw as a twin, the Spanish artist filled his work with double meanings
1
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Stephen Macknik

Discussion  - 
 
Salvador Dalí always thought of himself as a replacement for his older brother, who had died before the famous painter was born. Dalí’s theory is strengthened by the fact that his older brother had also been named Salvador. That’s creepy. We’re not certain if his art was a form of therapy, but it could explain some of his weird (and wonderful!) ideas. It is perhaps not surprising that double interpretations and images abound in Dali’s art.  Our new Illusions column in Scientific American: Mind, out this month, focuses on Dalí’s Doubles.  http://ow.ly/QSPMa See more of the the artistic repercussions @illusionchasers http://ow.ly/QSPGO 
Haunted by a deceased brother, whom he saw as a twin, the Spanish artist filled his work with double meanings
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Stephen Macknik

☄ Art in STEM (STEAM)  - 
 
Salvador Dalí always thought of himself as a replacement for his older brother, who had died before the famous painter was born. Dalí’s theory is strengthened by the fact that his older brother had also been named Salvador. That’s creepy. We’re not certain if his art was a form of therapy, but it could explain some of his weird (and wonderful!) ideas. It is perhaps not surprising that double interpretations and images abound in Dali’s art.  Our new Illusions column in Scientific American: Mind, out this month, focuses on Dalí’s Doubles.  http://ow.ly/QSPMa See more of the the artistic repercussions @illusionchasers http://ow.ly/QSPGO 
Haunted by a deceased brother, whom he saw as a twin, the Spanish artist filled his work with double meanings
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Stephen Macknik

Neuroscience  - 
 
Salvador Dalí always thought of himself as a replacement for his older brother, who had died before the famous painter was born. Dalí’s theory is strengthened by the fact that his older brother had also been named Salvador. That’s creepy. We’re not certain if his art was a form of therapy, but it could explain some of his weird (and wonderful!) ideas. It is perhaps not surprising that double interpretations and images abound in Dali’s art.  Our new Illusions column in Scientific American: Mind, out this month, focuses on Dalí’s Doubles.  http://ow.ly/QSPMa See more of the the artistic repercussions @illusionchasers http://ow.ly/QSPGO 
Haunted by a deceased brother, whom he saw as a twin, the Spanish artist filled his work with double meanings
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Stephen Macknik

Online Resources  - 
 
Salvador Dalí always thought of himself as a replacement for his older brother, who had died before the famous painter was born. Dalí’s theory is strengthened by the fact that his older brother had also been named Salvador. That’s creepy. We’re not certain if his art was a form of therapy, but it could explain some of his weird (and wonderful!) ideas. It is perhaps not surprising that double interpretations and images abound in Dali’s art.  Our new Illusions column in Scientific American: Mind, out this month, focuses on Dalí’s Doubles.  http://ow.ly/QSPMa See more of the the artistic repercussions @illusionchasers http://ow.ly/QSPGO 
Haunted by a deceased brother, whom he saw as a twin, the Spanish artist filled his work with double meanings
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Stephen Macknik

Science Resources  - 
 
Salvador Dalí always thought of himself as a replacement for his older brother, who had died before the famous painter was born. Dalí’s theory is strengthened by the fact that his older brother had also been named Salvador. That’s creepy. We’re not certain if his art was a form of therapy, but it could explain some of his weird (and wonderful!) ideas. It is perhaps not surprising that double interpretations and images abound in Dali’s art.  Our new Illusions column in Scientific American: Mind, out this month, focuses on Dalí’s Doubles.  http://ow.ly/QSPMa See more of the the artistic repercussions @illusionchasers http://ow.ly/QSPGO 
Haunted by a deceased brother, whom he saw as a twin, the Spanish artist filled his work with double meanings
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Stephen Macknik

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Salvador Dalí always thought of himself as a replacement for his older brother, who had died before the famous painter was born. Dalí’s theory is strengthened by the fact that his older brother had also been named Salvador. That’s creepy. We’re not certain if his art was a form of therapy, but it could explain some of his weird (and wonderful!) ideas. It is perhaps not surprising that double interpretations and images abound in Dali’s art.  Our new Illusions column in Scientific American: Mind, out this month, focuses on Dalí’s Doubles.  http://ow.ly/QSPMa See more of the the artistic repercussions @illusionchasers http://ow.ly/QSPGO 
Haunted by a deceased brother, whom he saw as a twin, the Spanish artist filled his work with double meanings
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Stephen Macknik

General Discussion  - 
 
Salvador Dalí always thought of himself as a replacement for his older brother, who had died before the famous painter was born. Dalí’s theory is strengthened by the fact that his older brother had also been named Salvador. That’s creepy. We’re not certain if his art was a form of therapy, but it could explain some of his weird (and wonderful!) ideas. It is perhaps not surprising that double interpretations and images abound in Dali’s art.  Our new Illusions column in Scientific American: Mind, out this month, focuses on Dalí’s Doubles.  http://ow.ly/QSPMa See more of the the artistic repercussions @illusionchasers http://ow.ly/QSPGO 
Haunted by a deceased brother, whom he saw as a twin, the Spanish artist filled his work with double meanings
1
Add a comment...

Stephen Macknik

Discussion  - 
 
Salvador Dalí always thought of himself as a replacement for his older brother, who had died before the famous painter was born. Dalí’s theory is strengthened by the fact that his older brother had also been named Salvador. That’s creepy. We’re not certain if his art was a form of therapy, but it could explain some of his weird (and wonderful!) ideas. It is perhaps not surprising that double interpretations and images abound in Dali’s art.  Our new Illusions column in Scientific American: Mind, out this month, focuses on Dalí’s Doubles.  http://ow.ly/QSPMa See more of the the artistic repercussions @illusionchasers http://ow.ly/QSPGO 
Haunted by a deceased brother, whom he saw as a twin, the Spanish artist filled his work with double meanings
1
Add a comment...
 
Salvador Dalí always thought of himself as a replacement for his older brother, who had died before the famous painter was born. Dalí’s theory is strengthened by the fact that his older brother had also been named Salvador. That’s creepy. We’re not certain if his art was a form of therapy, but it could explain some of his weird (and wonderful!) ideas. It is perhaps not surprising that double interpretations and images abound in Dali’s art.  Our new Illusions column in Scientific American: Mind, out this month, focuses on Dalí’s Doubles.  http://ow.ly/QSPMa See more of the the artistic repercussions @illusionchasers http://ow.ly/QSPGO 
Haunted by a deceased brother, whom he saw as a twin, the Spanish artist filled his work with double meanings
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People
In his circles
1,502 people
Have him in circles
1,351 people
sara Alkharashi's profile photo
eric coste's profile photo
Vincent Grillo's profile photo
Michele Banks's profile photo
Mohamad Shamsi's profile photo
Engin Arik's profile photo
Patsamorn Sahatsa's profile photo
Tim Seko's profile photo
Ase Innes-Ker's profile photo
Education
  • Harvard University
    PhD in Neurobiology, 1991 - 1996
  • University of California, Santa Cruz
    BA in Biology, Psychology, Psychobiology, 1986 - 1991
  • Seabury Hall
    HS, 1982 - 1986
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
Married
Story
Tagline
Lab Director, Columnist, Author, Speaker
Work
Occupation
I am a neurobiologist, author, speaker, and columnist at Scientific American
Skills
brain science, writing, speaking
Employment
  • SUNY Downstate Medical Center
    Professor of Ophthalmology, Neurology, and Physiology/Pharmacology, 2014 - present
    I am the Director of the Laboratory of Translational Neuroscience
  • Scientific American
    Columnist in Scientific American Mind, 2010 - present
    I write the "Illusions" column in the print edition of Scientific American Mind and I am also a blogger on the sciam.com Mind Network: both are in collaboration with Susana Martinez-Conde
  • Barrow Neurological Institute
    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurobiology, 2004 - 2014
    I was an associate professor of Neurosurgery and Neurobiology, and the Director of the Laboratory of Behavioral Neurophysiology here.
  • University College London
    Lecturer, 2001 - 2003
    My first professorship
  • Cold Spring Harbor Lab
    Postdoctoral Fellow, 1999 - 2001
    Scientist in training with Prof. Zachary Mainen
  • Harvard Medical School
    Postdoctoral Fellow, 1996 - 2001
    Scientist in training with Prof. David Hubel, who won the Nobel Prize for Medicine or Physiology in 1981.
  • University of California Santa Cruz Fire Department
    Firefighter, 1988 - 1990
    Coolest job I know
Places
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Currently
Brooklyn, NY
Previously
Phoenix, AZ - London, UK - Cold Spring Harbor, NY - Boston, MA - Santa Cruz, CA - Kula, Maui, HI - Mission Viejo, CA - Lincoln, MA - Apple Valley, CA - Dayton, OH
Contact Information
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Email
Work
Phone
+17182702990
Email
Address
SUNY Downstate Medical Center 450 Clarkson Ave, MSC 58 Brooklyn, NY 11203
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