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Stephen Ingraham
Works at Photographer (nature & landscape), Blogger
Attended University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
Lived in Kennebunk, ME
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Stephen Ingraham

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Sunset along the Olifant River, Balule Game Reserve, South Africa. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom.
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Wow
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Stephen Ingraham

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September 25
Our back yard is moss, mostly,
underneath, and when I mowed
it yesterday, I found, unmistakable,
moose tracks pressed into the soft
cushion of green...

I imagine the moose, standing
there in the night, antlers spread
wide, short-sighted eyes focused
on nothing, munching the sparse
sweet grass, half asleep, dreaming
moose dreams, while I am inside,
behind the window, 20 feet away,
breathing in the rhythm of my
CPAP machine, dreams suppressed...

otherwise, surely there would be
moose tracks pressed into the moss
of my mind as well as the yard.
Our back yard is moss, mostly, underneath, and when I mowed it yesterday, I found, unmistakable, moose tracks pressed into the soft cush...
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Stephen Ingraham

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Awesome!
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Morning at Marc's
My last full, non-travel, morning in South Africa I was at Marc’s Treehouse Lodge, operated by Viva Safaris. It is on a private Game Reserve west of the Orpen Gate at Kruger National Park. I decided to forego the scheduled activity and just spend the morning wandering around the grounds of the Lodge with my camera to see what I could see. I was very thankful to the staff at Marc’s for letting me do that. I stayed fairly close to the cabins and tents at the Lodge, as Marc’s is an unfenced camp and there is always the chance of the wandering Cape Buffalo or even Leopard on the grounds. I was looking mostly for smaller birds, as that is what I was missing from my African experience and all the game drives in high vehicles. As I mentioned in previous posts, South Africa and Kruger in particular, are well into a major drought, and it is the end of a long dry winter there, so birds were scarce, even in the trees along the river below the camp. I did see Pied Kingfisher and Little Bee-eater, both amazing birds, and that would have made my morning, but it was really the Sunbirds I wanted closer looks at. I was able to photograph the White-bellied Sunbird in the collage above several times that morning, and glimpsed at least two others during my walk…Scarlet-breasted and one of the yellow ones. (I got a record shot of the Scarlet-breasted the next morning before boarding the van for Johannesburg.) I love the Sunbirds…colored like a hummingbird and filling much the same niche…but with size, flight, and song of a finch. The Southern Black Tit was working the trees just at the edge of the sandy bed of the river, and the Yellow-breasted Apalis was in the vegetation around the pool just below the lodge where the giraffes come to drink. The Citrus Swallowtail was basking by the same pool. I was happy to ID this as the Citrus Swallowtail of Southern Africa and not the much more common, and closely related, Lemon Swallowtail, which is a problem butterfly in North Africa…invasive as far east as China and some of the South Pacific Islands, and as far west as Central America. I also photograhed a Red-capped Robin-chat, but was not able to get a really sharp image in the dense thicket it preferred. All in all, a very worthwhile morning.

All shots with the Sony RX10iii, at 600mm equivalent field of view. Program Mode. Processed in Lightroom and assembled in Coolage.


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Beautiful!!
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Stephen Ingraham

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For the love of blue.
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Stephen Ingraham

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September 22
I finished captioning 851 images
from South Africa this evening...
not my favorite task. I sit with
my reference books: birds, mammals,
etc. and try to id as many of the
creatures in my pics as possible,
and I put the general location for
each...info not already in the exif
file, so those who navigate my
galleries will know...but mostly
so I can remember myself...so I
will know, a year from now, ten
years from now (lord willing) what
I photographed and where...and so,
(again lord willing), should I ever
see these critters again I might
know their names...I might
recognize them. You'd be surprised
how much it helps...or maybe
you wouldn't...but it helps me.

If only it were as much fun as
taking the photos in the first place.
I finished captioning 851 images from South Africa this evening... not my favorite task. I sit with my reference books: birds, mammals, ...
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Magpie Shrike
At the end of a long dry winter in South Africa, one of the most present birds of the bush wherever you go, is the Magpie Shrike. Most locals, including our guides, still call it by its old name, the Long-tailed Shrike. And, indeed, the first thing you are likely to notice is the exceptionally long tail. I saw hundreds of them before pulling up alongside this one in the game viewer at Balule Game Reserve for a portrait. They are conspicuous, not only for their tail, but because they tend to perch in the tops of small to medium height brush and trees, where they can keep a sharp eye out for insects on the ground around them. Like most birds with long tails they use the tail for quick side-ways maneuvers and abrupt turns in flight, when pouncing on prey.

Sony RX10iii at 600mm equivalent field of view. 1/250th @ f4 @ ISO 100. Processed in Lightroom.


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I think this is feverfew, growing wild on the Kennebunk Plains. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom. 
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Very good
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Stephen Ingraham

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September 24
There are a few trees, maples, along
the shore of Day Brook Pond, that
feel the touch of fall first, turning,
showing red well ahead of the
season. Maybe deep springs under
water well up cold, adding a chill
to the air not felt elsewhere, or
maybe it is genetic, something
in the trees themselves, that
responds to the change in the
angle of the sun early. Whatever.
I am always happy to see the first
red of the season, there along the
cool shore of Day Brook Pond.

http://daypoems16.blogspot.com/2016/09/september-24.html
There are a few trees, maples, along the shore of Day Brook Pond, that feel the touch of fall first, turning, showing red well ahead of t...
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I am definitely back from Panama and South Africa. The first touch of fall along the shores of Day Brook Pond on the Kennebunk Plains Wildlife Management Area in W. Kennebunk Maine. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom. 
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beautiful place 
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Stephen Ingraham

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September 23
When I went to South Africa
I was not a rooibos drinker...
far from it...I did not like
rooibos. But mornings on
the thatched veranda at
Tremisana Lodge, with
monkeys watching from
the branches and warthogs
and Yellow-billed Hornbills
at the pool under the scarce
trees, there was only rooibos
if I did not want caffeine with
breakfast, and I didn't, so
I drank it South African style,
with milk, and it was so good
I ordered two boxes from
Amazon when I got home...
the real stuff, just what you
would buy for the table in
South Africa. And I brewed
a cup this evening, as soon
as it came, with a splash of
coconut milk, and it was good

even without the monkeys.

http://daypoems16.blogspot.com/2016/09/september-23.html
When I went to South Africa I was not a rooibos drinker... far from it...I did not like rooibos. But mornings on the thatched veranda at...
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+Netshisengani Lordney I assure you I was referring strictly to Vervet Monkeys, who are a real presence at every breakfast at Tremisana Lodge. So present that a lovely lady with a reed whisk has to keep them off the tables and way from the bowls of fruit. I enjoyed their antics every morning, but I can see how they might get tiresome. Not so the tea. I am enjoying another cup right now. :)
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Stephen Ingraham

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World Rhinoceros Day
Yesterday, September 22, was World Rhinoceros Day, and I missed it 🙁 So, here, a day late, are my two best shots of Rhinoceros in the wild, taken at Kruger National Park last week. Both are White Rhino. It turns out that “white” is a mistake, an accident based on the fact that the Dutch name was “wide-lipped” which sounded a bit like “white”, and the name for the other South African Rhino was “hooked lipped” which sounded a bit like “black”. So this is, in reality, the Wide-lipped Rhinoceros, so named because its wide lips are adapted for eating grasses at ground level. The Black, or Hook-lipped, Rhinoceros has narrow lips adapted for plucking leaves from standing trees and brush. Grazer vs. Browser. But it is too late for that. They are forever Black and White. Besides these two “wild” Rhinos, I saw lots of Rhinos at Tshukudu Game Reserve, where they specialize in Rhino (Tshakudu means Rhinoceros in the local language). Unfortunately, due to heavy poaching, all the Rhinos at Tshakudu have to be dehorned for their own protection. Poaching is huge problem. Kruger National Park has enough Rhino horn in stock to flood the market for 20 years to come, but each year proposals to release it for sale, and so drive down the prices to levels where poaching will not be so attractive, are defeated. The logic is that they do not want to “expand” the existing market to the point where poaching is the only way to meet the demand after their stocks run out. Others argue that Rhino horn could be “farmed” in a way that would meet the demand and save most wild Rhinos. I am glad it is not a decision I have to make…but it is one that needs making. I can certainly see the logic of putting the poachers out of business. There are signs along the road to Kruger in South Africa, posed on the property of private game reserves, that say “Poachers will be Poached!” and the people at Tshakudu will tell you about running gun battles between their rangers and poachers as recently as the past few months. It is a serious problem, and, when added to habitat loss, is keeping the Rhino at the edge of disaster.

Sony RX10iii at 1200mm equivalent field of view (2x Clear Image Zoom). Neither Rhino was nearly as close as they look in the images. Program. ISO 100 and ISO 1000. Processed in Lightroom.


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Stephen's Collections
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Christian, birder, photographer, blogger...
Introduction
Christian, husband, father, birder, photographer, blogger

My galleries: weiw.lightshedder.com
My blogs:
Point & Shoot Nature Photographer: psnp.lightshedder.com


Kinda walking the line where technology and spirituality meet. 


Bragging rights
Travel to 10-20 birding and photography events each year
Education
  • University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
  • Clarkson University
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Work
Occupation
Retired. Senior Brand Advocate for Birding and Wildlife Observation: Carl Zeiss Sports Optics
Skills
writing, photography, natural history
Employment
  • Photographer (nature & landscape), Blogger
    present
  • ZEISS Sports Optics
    Birding and Observation Product Specialist, 2002 - 2013
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Previously
Kennebunk, ME - Rehoboth, NM - Hoosick Falls, NY - Bennington, VT
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Kennebunk ME
My daughter bought a car here a year ago...when my wife and I needed a car we searched online and found an interesting car at Rowe. Excellent previsit emails. Excellent visit. Excellent car. Bought the car. They had a few visible rust spots professionally repaired before we picked it up. :)
Quality: ExcellentAppeal: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - 4 years ago
reviewed 4 years ago
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