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Stephen Ingraham
Works at Photographer (nature & landscape), Blogger
Attended University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
Lived in Kennebunk, ME
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Stephen Ingraham

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Landscape Love
Old Falls Pond in West Kennebunk ME is another local favorite for photography. I visit the pond and the Mousam River where it flows into the pond a fairly regular schedule to look for dragonflies, and the pond itself has produced more than its share of landscape studies. This is just where the Mousam turns to pond, and over the winter two of the maples along the shore succumbed to ice, snow, and wind. We had a hard winter. I am observing a "leading lines" theme in my own landscapes...something I am learning from these daily posts. I did not realize how often I include leading line elements in the foreground of my images, and how carefully (if semi-consciously) I place them. The two fallen trees here...out from the frame corners...do the trick. 
Nikon P900 at 24mm equivalent field of view and Landscape Mode. Exposure adjusted by histogram. Processed in Lightroom.
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Stephen Ingraham

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Landscape Love
From the shores of Timber Point south of Biddeford Pool Maine, this very simple leading line land/seascape would be much ado about nothing if not for, what are to me, the fascinating textures and subtle tones in the grey wood and stone...set off so nicely by the pale sky and blue green sea. There is just enough cloud texture in the sky to keep it from boring. Again, this shot utilizes the extreme depth of field of the Point and Shoot sensor camera to good advantage. Or that is what I think :)
Nikon P900 in Landscape Mode. Processed in Lightroom. 
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How about this scott
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Stephen Ingraham

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Landscape Love
It is rare to find Lady Slipper Orchids growing out from under cover. I see them more typically in deep, damp, forests. These are under a pine tree on the shore of Day Brook Pond (yes, the same pond as yesterday...just further up the shore.) As you can tell from my posts, I like this kind of landscape shot, with a dominant element in the foreground, a low angle, and lots of depth. The Lady Slippers here are maybe a shade to dominant...but I think enough of the pond shows to balance. :)
Nikon P900 in Landscape Mode. Exposure compensation set via histogram. It would be difficult to match the depth of field that a Point and Shoot sensor provides in any other format. 
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Wow this is the 2nd post of a wild Cypripedium posted today! Beautiful orchid!#!!#. Thanks 4 sharing.....
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Stephen Ingraham

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Since my friend Rich really likes Cedar Waxwings...a little something to spice up his weekend. Nikon P900. Assembled in Coolage on my Surface Pro 3. 
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Nice
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Stephen Ingraham

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Landscape Love
I have photographed this little tumble of water on the Batson River at Emmons Preserve (Kennebunkport Conservation Trust) in all seasons of the year and in most weathers. It is always a question: do I freeze the motion with a fast shutter or do I blur the water to silk using a slow shutter-speed. I know the fashion is for silky water, but I actually prefer to catch the splash and tumble. To me it maintains more of the undeniable energy I feel in falling water...and more of the music...even if the music is on pause. :)
Nikon P900 in Landscape Mode. 
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Stephen Ingraham

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Landscape Love
I have decided to post a landscape a day for the next while. Mostly just because. I love landscape photos, but most of what I post is birds, bugs, flowers, etc. I am hoping the discipline of picking a landscape photo daily will teach me something more about landscapes.

This is one of my favorite walks around home, along the lower Mousam River on what is called the Kennebunk Bridle Path. Early Spring. The maples are just in bud, but not flowered out. The sky is the subject here, of course, set off against the somewhat bleak landscape. 

Nikon P900 in Landscape Mode (what else?) at 28mm equivalent field of view. 1/2000th @ f3.2 @ ISO 100. Processed in Lightroom. 
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you are nice couple, love your photography
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Stephen Ingraham

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Pic for Today: Yellow Warblerish
Yellow Warbler is likely one of the most abundant warblers in North America…or that is how it seems in May and June. They are so bright and so loud that they are hard to miss…and then there is their habit of climbing up on protruding branches, low or high, fully exposed, and singing in the sun. I suppose they are so obvious that one Yellow Warbler can dominate a space that might contain 30 other warblers. Maybe that is why they seem so abundant. This one was near the parking area for the Timber Point / Timber Island trail at the new Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge property south of Biddeford Pool in Maine. It is a totally classic view of a very present bird :)

It is a great antidote for the weather as we enter our third day of pretty constant cold rain in Southern Maine. We do need the water, but…

Nikon P900 at 2000mm equivalent field of view. 1/500th @ ISO 100 @ f6.5. Processed and cropped slightly for composition in Lightroom.
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Beautiful!
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Pic for Today: Chipper on the edge!
The chipmunks were not as evident along Rachel Carson NWR’s Timber Island / Timber Point Trail on Saturday as they were in the fall. In the fall they were everywhere and everywhere active collecting acorns. On Saturday I only caught one out in plain sight, and he was so startled that he clung frozen to the side of the tree where I first saw him for several moments…hanging on, as they say, by his toenails. :)

Nikon P900 at 2000mm equivalent field of view. 1/400th @ ISO 400 @ f6.5. Processed in Lightroom.
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Very Nice picture
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Pic for Today: Black Swallowtail. Happy Sunday!
Yesterday I made my first pilgrimage of the year to the Timber Point / Timber Island section of Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge just south of Bidderford Pool. You might remember that I highlighted this is a new addition to the Wildlife Refuge in a few posts last fall. They only made a decision on how to use the property in the early winter, after the predictable period of study, recommendations, public comment, (the expected bit of controversy), etc. The property includes an large building, formerly a guest lodge, and the NWR system does not have the funds to renovate it for use. They have decided to bring only the exterior up to code, and post “interpretative personnel” there for an expanded range of activities and programs during the season…the minimalist approach. We will see how that goes. The property consists of the tip of a rocky peninsula leading out to low-tide-only crossing to Timber Island. Both the headland and the island are rocky outcrops, with lots of big boulders. On the mainland much of this is covered by a mature oak forest, with some open fields and old ornamental trees right along the water. On the inland side of the trail/access road there is an extensive fresh water marsh. Timber Island was pretty much clear cut, and is now home to a dense thicket of pine and bramble, with some fresh water marsh. All in all, a prime piece of habitat for birds and mammals and bugs, and a great addition to the NWR system!

It is not very big and you can explore the accessible parts on the point in a couple of hours. If you time your visit for low tide, you can cross to Timber Island and do a loop around the rocky shore and the edge of the pine forest. That will add at least an hour to your visit. It is not the most exiting place in the world, but I have only been there 4 times now, and on each visit I have had at least one significant sighting…and it is a great place to get out and walk. The highlight of yesterday’s visit might have been this male Black Swallowtail butterfly, caught sipping from the Honeysuckle that lines the trail in open areas most of the way down the point. The Black Swallowtail is a common butterfly over much of North America, but certainly a beautiful bug. This panel shows off both top and bottom views of the wing patterns. The Black Swallowtail is a partial mimic of the Spicebush Swallowtail…a poisonous cousin…the female on both upper and lower surfaces…the male only on the under-wings. This mimicry, apparently, provides the much more common Black with a measure of protection from predators.

As with the puddling Tiger Swallowtails I posted last Monday, this was a particularly fresh male, probably only emerged a few days to a week ago. It showed little wear on the wings and both “tails” were intact. I rarely see them in this kind of pristine condition. :)

Nikon P900 at 800mm equivalent field of view. 1/500th @ ISO 125 @ f5.6. Processed and cropped in Lightroom. Assembled in Coolage.

Many of us (humans) have a fascination with butterflies. The beauty and delicacy of the wings…the slow dancing flight…make them the angels of the bug world…so much so that most people do not really think of them as insects, and if they do, they don’t think of them the same way they think of other insects. Butterfly collecting is not what it once was…due partially to ecological awareness…and perhaps more to the advent of the digital camera and lenses long enough to photograph butterflies in the field and field guides to “butterflies through binoculars”…but a “butterfly house” is still a major attraction for any zoo or park. Many of the birders I know now will now confess to being butterfliers too. We love our butterflies. One of the new features of Timber Point this year, in fact, is several large plantings of “Monarch” habitat along the trail, with signs for protection. The Monarch, you might know, is a long distant migrant butterfly that is in serious decline due to habitat (host plant) loss. There is not much there yet, on Timber Point, but I assume they are Milkweed plantings, since Milkweed is the host plant of the Monarch. They have even brought in a portable pump to make sure the Milkweed gets a good start this year.

And of course, conservation and restoration is the most sincere expression of love. Love that does not “take care” of what it loves is not love at all. We respond to the love of the creator not because we are created, but because we are cared for…and we experience, once aware, that care in every moment of our lives. And of course, the creator cares for the butterflies too. We are uniquely privileged, when we take an hand in conservation and restoration, to share that care. What a gift! Happy Sunday.
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beautiful butterfly
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Stephen Ingraham

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Landscape Love
Day Brook Pond on the Kennebunk Plains in West Kennebunk Maine is one of my favorite photoprowls. It is a rich landscape, visually, and a rich habitat for birds, dragonflies and damselflies, and reptiles. Beaver worked the pond not too many years ago. A jumble messy new growth surrounds the classically elegant fallen birches, and the pond catches the light from the dramatic sky. What is not to like?

Nikon P900 in Landscape mode. Exposure compensation adjusted by histogram. Processed in Lightroom. 
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Thanks for the information... I thought the fallen birches were cut to serve man's purpose...
It was an awesome shot, Stephen Ingraham... Thanks again...
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Pic for Today: Cedar Waxwing Showoff
I took a photoprowl out to the Kennebunk Plains and Day Brook Pond yesterday. There were hundreds of dragonflies, many of them newly emerged and on maiden flights, with Itheir wings still soft and full of light. Dancers (damselflies) of some sort were also emerging in high numbers, and where dancers emerge you are bound to find Cedar Waxwings picking them out of the grass and air. I watched a flock of 6 or 7 Cedar Waxwings hunting and feeding all around me. One flew by within arms reach, on its way to a dancer in the grass, and several posed as close as I have ever seen a Cedar Waxwing. This bird was photographed at 2000mm equivalent, and you can see a great deal of feather detail. That is pretty good, considering that the Cedar Waxwing has some of the most delicate plumage of any bird…more like hair than feathers. In this shot, I really like the eye with its clear reflection. I can’t quite see myself in it, but close. :)

Nikon P900 at 2000mm equivalent field of view. 1/500th @ f6.5 @ ISO 320. Processed in Topaz Dejpeg and Lightroom.

This post is dedicated to my friend Rich, who loves Cedar Waxwings!
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beautiful bird.
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Pic for Today: Angel Wings (Fringed Polygala)
We are having a very odd spring. There were no Angle Wings (Fringed Polygala) along the trail at Rachel Carson NWR Headquarters, where they are generally common…and yet, the very next day, the woods at Laudholm Farm were full of them. The two spots are separated by less than a mile as the crow flies. I can think of no good reason to explain why they would be in bloom one place and not the other…but that is nature…ever mysterious :)

Nikon P900 in Close Up Mode at 95mm equivalent field of view. 1/400th @ f4 @ ISO 100. Processed in Lightroom. Cropped for scale.
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Dear Zafar Iqbal - thanks I have seen the photo -

it is good and perfect
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  • University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
  • Clarkson University
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Christian, husband, father, birder, photographer, blogger...
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Christian, husband, father, birder, photographer, blogger

My galleries: weiw.lightshedder.com
My blogs:
Point & Shoot 4 Landscape: ps4land.lightshedder.com
Point & Shoot 4 Wildlife: ps4wild.lightshedder.com
Cloudy Days and Connected Nights: cdcn.lightshedder.com

Kinda walking the line where technology and spirituality meet. 


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Travel to 10-20 birding events each year
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Birding and Observation Product Specialist: Carl Zeiss Sports Optics
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  • Photographer (nature & landscape), Blogger
    Carl Zeiss Birding and Observation Product Specialist, present
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Kennebunk, ME - Rehoboth, NM - Hoosick Falls, NY - Bennington, VT
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My daughter bought a car here a year ago...when my wife and I needed a car we searched online and found an interesting car at Rowe. Excellent previsit emails. Excellent visit. Excellent car. Bought the car. They had a few visible rust spots professionally repaired before we picked it up. :)
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