Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Stefano Gorgoni
1,687 followers -
Untill proved otherwise, i'm immortal
Untill proved otherwise, i'm immortal

1,687 followers
About
Posts

Post has shared content
Let's work together to improve Google for #smallbiz owners. Sign up to help shape the future of our products → https://goo.gl/8LQCSK
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Want to expand your reach past "just" a website? Starting today, you can build Conversation Actions using Actions on Google. This developer platform allows you to bring your services to the Google Assistant on Google Home. Using the Actions SDK, developers can directly parse requests and construct responses that adhere to the Conversation API. Developer tools such as API.AI make the experience even easier, and you can use a graphical user interface to define the conversation.

It is really easy to get started with Actions on Google, and you can learn more from our blog post https://goo.gl/RjhcOF and the introduction video below. Join us at our new G+ community at http://g.co/actionsdev to keep up to date and share ideas with other developers.

#ActionsOnGoogle
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
A search-engine guide to 301, 302, 307, & other redirects

It’s useful to understand the differences between the common kinds of redirects, so that you know where to use them (and can recognize when they’re used incorrectly). Luckily, when it comes to Google, we’re pretty tolerant of mistakes, so don’t worry too much :).

In general, a redirect is between two pages, here called R & S (it also works for pages called https://example.com/filename.asp , or pretty much any URL). Very simplified, when you call up page R, it tells you that the content is at S, and when it comes to browsers, they show the content of S right away. That sounds simple enough, why are there different types of redirects? Let’s take a look at the redirects, then it’ll be clearer.

Server-side redirects (the webserver returns the redirect as soon as you try to access a page, the user never sees any of the content of page R):

301 permanent redirect: The server tells us that nothing will change its mind about this redirect. Just use “S” in the future, you can cache it like that. Search engines tend to index the content under “S”, and forward any signals from R to S. Useful when you change your site’s URLs for good (site moves, restructures, switching to HTTPS), well, at least until you find a new permanent home for them.

302 temporary redirect: Like the name says, this might not be that permanent. It might change in the future, it might change depending on who accesses it, on the device used, or the user’s location. You can’t cache this. Search engines tend to index the content (and keep all signals) under “R”, since it’s unsure that it’ll always redirect to “S.” This is useful for redirecting from the root URL to a lower-level page (“/” -> “/fancycms/mainpage.php”), and for redirects that depend on the user’s country, device, or language settings.

Client-side redirects (the webserver returns content for both R & S, but the browser recognizes the redirect):

JavaScript redirects: If you can’t do a server-side redirect, using JavaScript is a good fall-back. If you’re using a JavaScript framework for your site, this might also be the only option. Caching depends on the server settings, and search engines have to guess at what you’re trying to do (index under R or S?).

Meta refresh-type redirects: They’re kinda like JavaScript redirects, but usually not recommended.

307 redirects: Wait, isn’t this a server-side redirect? No, this is actually your browser trolling you. If you set up HTTPS, 301 redirect from HTTP to HTTPS, and enable HSTS, when you try to access the HTTP version in your browser, it’ll automatically access the HTTPS version, but record it as a 307 redirect. The 307 is a lie :).

What about PageRank? It’s simple, either the search engine indexes the content with its signals under R or under S, it doesn’t matter which type of redirect you use.

What about 303? 304.5? If you have strong feelings about one of the other kinds of redirects, feel free to use them. We’ll have to figure out which URL to index the content under, so if you have strong feelings about that too, make sure to follow up with other canonicalization signals.

How many redirects can you do at the same time? We follow up to 5 in a chain (please keep any redirect chain as short as possible), but you can redirect as many URLs on your site as you want at the same time.

How does RankBrain fit into this? It doesn’t.

The web isn’t perfect, search engines have to deal with what they find. Sometimes sites use a temporary redirect where a permanent one would be correct, sometimes the other way around. That’s why this is just one of several signals we use for picking the right URL (“canonicalization”).

In short, for 301 or 302:
301: “S” tends to get indexed, the redirect is cached
302: “R” tends to get indexed, the redirect isn’t cached

I hope this helps understand the differences & pick the right type when you need to set up redirects! Let me know if anything’s confusing :).

More about canonicalization: https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/139066?hl=en
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
An update (March 2016) on the current state & recommendations for JavaScript sites / Progressive Web Apps [1] in Google Search. We occasionally see questions about what JS-based sites can do and still be visible in search, so here's a brief summary for today's state:

# Don't cloak to Googlebot. Use "feature detection" & "progressive enhancement" [2] techniques to make your content available to all users. Avoid redirecting to an "unsupported browser" page. Consider using a polyfill or other safe fallback where needed. The features Googlebot currently doesn't support include Service Workers, the Fetch API, Promises, and requestAnimationFrame.

# Use rel=canonical [3] when serving content from multiple URLs is required.

# Avoid the AJAX-Crawling scheme on new sites. Consider migrating old sites that use this scheme soon. Remember to remove "meta fragment" tags when migrating. Don't use a "meta fragment" tag if the "escaped fragment" URL doesn't serve fully rendered content. [4]

# Avoid using "#" in URLs (outside of "#!"). Googlebot rarely indexes URLs with "#" in them. Use "normal" URLs with path/filename/query-parameters instead, consider using the History API for navigation.

# Use Search Console's Fetch and Render tool [5] to test how Googlebot sees your pages. Note that this tool doesn't support "#!" or "#" URLs.

# Ensure that all required resources (including JavaScript files / frameworks, server responses, 3rd-party APIs, etc) aren't blocked by robots.txt. The Fetch and Render tool will list blocked resources discovered. If resources are uncontrollably blocked by robots.txt (e.g., 3rd-party APIs) or otherwise temporarily unavailable, ensure that your client-side code fails gracefully.

# Limit the number of embedded resources, in particular the number of JavaScript files and server responses required to render your page. A high number of required URLs can result in timeouts & rendering without these resources being available (e.g., some JavaScript files might not be loaded). Use reasonable HTTP caching directives.

# Google supports the use of JavaScript to provide titles, description & robots meta tags, structured data, and other meta-data. When using AMP, the AMP HTML page must be static as required by the spec, but the associated web page can be built using JS/PWA techniques. Remember to use a sitemap file with correct "lastmod" dates for signaling changes on your website.

# Finally, keep in mind that other search engines and web services accessing your content might not support JavaScript at all, or might support a different subset.

Looking at this list, none of these recommendations are completely new & limited to today -- and they'll continue to be valid for foreseeable future. Working with modern JavaScript frameworks for search can be a bit intimidating at first, but they open up some really neat possibilities to make fast & awesome sites!

I hope this was useful! Let me know if I missed anything, or if you need clarifications for any part.

Links:
[1] PWA: https://developers.google.com/web/progressive-web-apps
[2] Progressive enhancement: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressive_enhancement
[3] rel=canonical: https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/139066
[4] AJAX Crawling scheme: https://developers.google.com/webmasters/ajax-crawling/docs/specification
[5] https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/6066468
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Guns N' Roses online slot is finally live. Play now on Casino Heroes! https://www.casinoheroes.com/en/games/slots/netent/guns-n-roses/
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Do you know the history of slot machines?
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Originally shared by ****
The Content Marketing Handbook
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Introducing Calculated Metrics for Google Analytics
#analytics   #measure   #metrics  

Calculated Metrics are user-defined metrics that are computed from existing metrics and drive more relevant analyses and enable greater actionability without leaving the product.

To create a new calculated metric in Google Analytics follow these steps:

1. Select the Admin tab
2. Navigate to the appropriate VIEW
3. Click on Calculated Metrics
4. Click on NEW CALCULATED METRIC

Learn more on our Help Center: https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/6121409
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Everyone loves free spins, everyone wants them. But how do you get free spins on Casino Heroes? Here's the complete list of ways to get them!
Free spins: 6 ways to get them
Free spins: 6 ways to get them
blog.casinoheroes.com
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded