Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Stefan Quandt
145 followers
145 followers
About
Posts

Post has shared content

Post has shared content
"Smog is a problem. But the knowledge about its constituents - no longer. Researchers from several leading Warsaw scientific institutions have joined forces and developed a new, extremely precise method for the chemical analysis of suspended particulate matter. The method, easily adaptable in many modern laboratories, not only determines the chemical composition of compounds, but even recognizes changes in the spatial distribution of atoms in molecules.

Atmospheric particulate matter, popularly known as smog, is becoming more and more troublesome. Its particles are now attacking the lungs of the inhabitants of not only big cities. In industrialized countries it is literally everywhere, even in forest areas seemingly distant from urban agglomerations. This ubiquitous smog is characterized by a huge richness of chemical compounds, many of them occurring in isomeric forms, differing in the distribution of atoms in the molecule, and consequently also in their chemical properties. The detection of these isomers used to be the weak point of modern analytical techniques - until now.

In the pages of Analytical Chemistry, Warsaw-based scientists from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences (IPC PAS), the Institute of Organic Chemistry of the PAS and the Institute of Environmental Protection of the National Research Institute have presented a method of extremely precise analysis of smog particles. The new analytical technique will be able to be used by any relatively modernly equipped chemical laboratory.

"What is really reaching our lungs? When we look closely at air samples, it turns out that they contain a lot of aerosols. In most cases, these particles, with sizes in the order of micro- or even nanometers, are of natural origin. These are mainly particles produced in gigantic quantities by complex atmospheric processes, whose main drivers are plants, especially forests," says Dr. Rafal Szmigielski, professor at the IPC PAS, head of the research team which has for years been dealing with the secrets of atmospheric chemistry, including the mechanisms of suspended particulate matter formation and the evolution of smog".

Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Der US-Präsident sei irrational, heißt es überall, doch das Gegenteil ist der Fall. Trump hält sich genau an das Programm, das in Claremont für ihn entworfen wurde.
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
RNA-interfering Vaccine can Protect Plants From Pests

"...A new project... is assessing how vaccines that interfere with strands of genetic material called RNA might be a good option for protecting plants in an environmentally friendly way."

https://www.labroots.com/trending/cell-and-molecular-biology/8815/rna-based-vaccine-protect-plants-pests
Add a comment...

Post has shared content

Post has attachment
Facebook data: Cambridge University following in the footsteps of Cambridge Analytica.
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Virtual-reality nature documentaries are making safaris more accessible

"For international tourists, wildlife is a major part of visiting the African continent. But cost and distance often make the same world-famous game parks inaccessible for Africans. Now, advances in virtual reality are putting Africa’s wildlife within reach for anyone with a smartphone and VR headset.

Exodus: The Great Migration, which follows the migration of wildebeest, gazelles, and zebras across the Maasai Mara and Serengeti plains, is one of an increasing number of nature documentaries filmed as 360-degree visual experiences. Created by Johannesburg-based film startup DeepVR, the documentary is also one of few such films made by African filmmakers.

Exodus gives viewers the sensation of being in the middle of a wildebeest herd as they make the perilous journey across the crocodile-infested Mara River. Seen through a VR headset, the wildebeest scramble right by you as they struggle up an embankment. In perhaps the most incredible scene, viewers even find themselves inside the mouth of a lioness. (That moment came about by chance, when a curious lioness tried to bite the camera lens.)..."

https://qz.com/1270309/virtual-reality-nature-documentaries-let-you-run-with-wildebeest-making-safaris-more-accessible/

#future = #REALnews #tech #innovation #design #sustainability #science #engineering #singularity #progress #vr #virtualreality #ar #augmentedreality #mr #mixedreality #metaverse #nature #travel #conservation
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Video: Hövding wants to save cyclists that are too cool for helmets http://tnw.me/GVOcQOl
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Stefan Quandt commented on a post on Blogger.
Google please do anything you want, but don't axe the Play Music app.
My mood has become very dependent on its orange theming and the app's features and navigation is just well thought out and serves well for all common use cases and I got very much used to it.
Also and most importantly my Play Music is now very well trained to play the music I like. With that I mean that it all the time offers me new 'Radio Stations' and playlists which very well matches the styles of music I like (instead of just playing the artists, albums and songs which I gave a 'like', which would be awfully boring).
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Wait while more posts are being loaded