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Stefan Hacker
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151 followers
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Stefan's posts

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Interesting post about how google handles releases and rollbacks. Does not go very deep into things but there still are some interesting points in there like their basic strategy for dealing (or rather not having to deal with) with database schema changes during rollback.

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In Herb Sutter's words: "C++17 is done!" (https://herbsutter.com/2017/03/24/trip-report-winter-iso-c-standards-meeting-kona-c17-is-complete/ ). As expected no earth shattering new features. That being said there are quite a few useful changes in the new release. Here are some examples:

* Structured binding declarations, allowing auto [a, b] = getTwoReturnValues();
* std::string_view, a read-only non-owning reference to a character sequence or string-slice (also std::optional and std::any)
* Nested namespace definitions, e.g., namespace X::Y { … } instead of namespace X { namespace Y { … }}
* Template deduction of constructors, allowing std::pair(5.0, false) instead of std::pair<double,bool>(5.0, false)
* Inline variables, which allows the definition of variables in header files

See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C%2B%2B17 for the complete list. The new standard still has to pass some ISO process hassles before it will be published but those will not change the contents.

Sorting stuff in go is so painful. y u no generics :(

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Very cool series about the basic principles of JIT compilation. In it a basic JIT compiler for BF is developed in C++. Imho the author did a great job of building up to the actual jitting. Important information is presented at every step along the way and it all is relevant for the final product. Really very nicely written. If you like low level stuff it is well worth the read. 

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Not good. SHA1 still is kinda important in tons of stuff. Heck MD5 is still around...

Can only applaud the foresight of the browser vendors to push so hard for deprecating it in certificates.

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Everytime the topic of Linux desktop use comes up I catch funny looks for my low opinion of the state of security of the common desktop stacks. Somehow the association Linux == secure has been burned into many people's minds who ought to know better. Linux SERVER systems, when properly maintained and configured, are an amazingly stable and secure platform. I've yet to see a Linux desktop I would call either. Microsoft has taken desktop security very seriously for quite a while now and, all other things being equal, I have much more trust in Windows 10 than the Linux counterparts. Now things aren't equal. Noone cares to attack Linux desktops. As we aren't all under "persistent threats" by "state actors" targeting us directly, that still makes you "safer" with a Linux Desktop system. Imho that's not rooted in any technical superiority though. Quite the contrary.

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Online ASCII drawing tool. Might come in handy from time to time for documenting something directly in code.

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More nature craziness. Good thing I never had the illusion of being (fully) rational in the first place ;)

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Interesting article on load shedding as a cheap means of coping with unexpected traffic spikes.
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