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Stairway to Freedom Sober Living
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Choosing the Right Sober Living House for You: Living in a safe environment with access to support and structure is an important step on the road to complete recovery. There are a number of factors that recovering addicts should consider when looking for the perfect sober living house. Four Tips for Choosing a Sober Living House Each of these factors plays a tremendous role in the success of a sober living house, so as you navigate your options, make sure to ask plenty of questions about each of the following: #1 Accountability The only way anybody ever is going to really get back to an independent, substance-free existence after rehab is to take accountability for their actions. A sober living house should help former addicts adjust to this way of thinking and living, which means drug tests, breathalyzers, and even curfews all should be set up as safeguards to ensure you are remaining honest in your sobriety and moving safely toward life after the halfway house. #2 Support Ideally, most of this accountability would come from within, but no individual can navigate this process alone, which is why a strong support system also is important. The best support in the journey toward sobriety comes from people who genuinely are sympathetic, yet still tough and honest. Compassion is a key part of this process, too, so finding a staff that understands and appreciates what you’re going through, while still holding you to that accountability piece that is so important is essential in selecting an ideal sober living facility. #3 Structure Something else recovering addicts need in their daily lives is plenty of structure, and honestly the more mundane that daily routine, the better. While a curfew is one way to enact this structure, other routines are equally helpful. Essentially, there should be a number of set-in-stone rules and regulations that exist to supplement the spiritual and therapeutic work a person does throughout the course of the day, and good sober living facilities have solid rules and a predictable routine, all of which works to create a zero-tolerance drug-free environment for people in recovery. #4 Location There are all sorts of different halfway houses available to those leaving rehab, but with so many other things to stress about in recovery, personal safety shouldn’t be among them. Choosing a sober living facility in a safe neighborhood is important, because while it’s impossible to avoid temptation completely in the real world, it is possible to move as far away from temptation as possible when true, long-lasting sobriety is still a work in progress. Recovering from any sort of substance abuse isn’t easy, even upon completion of rehab, when it feels like the worst of things is in the rearview mirror. A supportive sober living facility is the next pit stop on the road to true recovery, and here at Stairway to Freedom, we would love to be that destination.   #soberlivingchicago
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How Can Sober Living Facilities in Chicago Support My Emotional Health?: The early days of recovery can feel like they drag on forever. You may feel empty, depressed or like you've lost your best friend. All sorts of emotions begin to surface. Emotions that you didn't even know existed. Anger, fear, grief, shame. These feelings can rise up in your body and feel like you're being assaulted. You may feel filled with rage or like crying for hours. You may feel like you want revenge or you may experience self-loathing. When these emotions surface, it's vital to seek support and resources. Let's explore ways you can handle these uncomfortable emotions. Long-forgotten Emotions All emotions have a cause and a purpose in our lives. Each emotion serves a function that only it can do. But after years in active addiction, we start to lose our ability to identify our emotions. Sober Living Chicago Houses can bring you the support you need to safely explore the following emotions: Anger Anger is within us as a protective mechanism signifying a boundary violation. When anger arises, we must first ask ourselves, "did someone violate my boundary or did I violate my own boundary by going against my values?" Functions: Drives us to action, signals a boundary violation Tools: * Journaling about your anger- this can help calm the anger so you can see and understand it more clearly * Speaking with a trusted person or in group about the anger * If the anger is towards yourself, identifying where you violated your value code and remedy the situation- amends and self-forgiveness are ways to begin remedying the situation * If the anger is towards another person, PAUSE- allow yourself time to process your anger with a trusted other, then communicate your boundary * Identify the fear hidden beneath the anger- "what am I afraid of?" * Seek feedback from others- what do they see? How have they handled anger regarding a similar situation? Learn from others * Oftentimes, anger will dissolve after we feel listened to and validated, which is why speaking to a counselor, sponsor or peer at a Sober Living Chicago house can be so helpful Fear Underneath all anger is fear. We're afraid of losing someone or something. The two most common fears in the human experience are the fear of rejection and abandonment. Functions: Protection, survival Tools: * Journaling about your fear with two columns marked "true fear" and "imagined fear" * Speaking with a trusted person or in group- you'll find that most other people have the same fear * Seek feedback- what suggestions might they have? How have they handled a similar fear in the past? Grief It's important that we get in touch with our grief during the recovery process. It's normal to feel intense feelings of loss as we step from our half-life of addiction, into our full-life of sobriety. We need to be able to grieve and release: * Our drug-of-choice * Relationships during active addiction * Mistakes during active addiction (after taking responsibility and making amends) * Lost opportunities * Jobs Functions: Making way for the new Tools: * Welcoming the stages of grief into your life. It's all part of the process- denial, anger, bargaining, depression, acceptance * Journaling * Speaking to a trusted person or your group * Seeking feedback Shame During early recovery, we must begin to separate our healthy shame from toxic shame. Healthy shame is what we feel for hurting those we love. Healthy shame moves us to recognize the pain we caused, take responsibility and change our direction. Toxic shame is what happens when we feel unworthy, defective or damaged. This type of shame can create "shame spirals" that pull us down quickly. We need to separate the two: "I am not a bad person for making a mistake, but I did something bad and need to take responsibility for correcting it." Functions: Prompts us to change course and make amends Tools: * Journaling * Speaking with a trusted person * Seeking feedback * Making amends Loving Yourself Through It All Above all, do NOT isolate. This is a trap. Reach out. Seek support. And give yourself credit for how far you've come. Be patient with yourself. Encourage yourself. And, most importantly, love yourself, not the addiction. Sober Living Chicago Resources If you're looking for Sober Living Chicago facilities that will provide the support and accountability you need while you sort out your emotions, contact us. We are committed to helping you maintain sobriety. Give us a call today!   #soberlivingchicago
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A Brief History of Sober Living Houses & Why They're Still Important Today: At Stairway to Freedom, we believe strongly in the power of sober living houses; it's what we’re all about. And that’s why we wanted to take a moment to look back at the history of sober living houses and why they're still so important today. Understanding Sober Living Homes According to a scholarly article by Douglas L. Polcin and Diane Henderson, sober living houses (or SLHs) are places where people can live in a drug- and alcohol-free environment while trying to maintain abstinence. They are especially beneficial for those who are homeless, recently incarcerated, or don't have the social support to stay sober on their own. Not everyone struggling with substance abuse has a group of people cheering them on at home, encouraging them to get sober and stay sober. So for those who lack that support at home, an SLH can provide a strong and inspiring community of other sober individuals. Formal treatment is not generally provided in a sober living home, but residents who live in an SLH are strongly encouraged, and often even required, to participate in a 12-step program. The History of SLHs Polcin and Henderson explain that SLHs began in the 1830's through institutions like the YMCA, YWCA, and the Salvation Army. Unlike today, these homes were generally run by religious groups with strong convictions about sobriety, and residents were often required to participate in religious services. Skipping forward to the 20th century, the Post-WWII era brought with it more alcohol addiction, tighter living quarters, and bigger cities. This is also when Alcoholics Anonymous was born. During the 1970's the need for sober living homes increased because not only were drugs and alcohol problems on the rise, but existing SLHs were being pushed out of cities due to the lack of affordable housing. This made these types of havens few and far between. Another factor that led to a greater demand for sober living homes was the increase of homelessness in the 80's and 90's. According to the article, a conservative estimate is that 40% of homeless people struggle with alcohol addiction and 15% deal with drug addiction. SLHs have the potential to help end the vicious cycle of homelessness and alcohol or substance abuse. The second half of the 20th century did bring about several models of sober living homes, including the Oxford Houses. These houses emphasized peer support and democratic leadership. They were also self-sustaining—not run by outside organizations. Different models have used a "manager" of sorts to collect rent and kick people out when they relapse. But today, most models agree that a "peer council" is a better route that promotes unity and teamwork. Why SLHs Are Still So Important Today This brings us to the discussion of the importance of SLHs today. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism recently conducted a five-year study of sober living homes, tracking 300 people in 20 different SLHs across the country. Of the 300 people who initially agreed to participate in the study, 130 were available for the 6-month follow up. 40% reported they had remained abstinent for the whole 6 months, and 24% reported they were sober 5 of the 6 months. While there is obvious evidence of some relapse, living in an SLH did increase the likelihood of recovery. Other big factors in recovery found by the study were the severity of a psychiatric condition and participation in a 12-step program. The study concluded: "Sober living houses are an excellent example of an underutilized modality that could help provide clean and sober living environments to individuals completing residential treatment, engaging in outpatient programs, leaving incarceration, or seeking alternatives to formal treatment." Stairway to Freedom is an organization committed to providing both men’s and women’s sober living options in Chicago. It is our mission to see people succeed on their journey to sobriety through the support provided by a sober living community. For more information on our sober living facilities, please contact us today. #soberlivingchicago
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Six Common Myths about Addiction that Stifle Recovery: The road to recovery from any sort of substance addiction is a long and challenging one that unfortunately very often comes with a whole lot of questionable advice about recovery from friends and family who think they know how best to help the people close to them. There are plenty of myths about recovery that can give recovering addicts the wrong idea about how to squash their demons, but these myths often are counterproductive to the healing process. Knowing this, we want to make sure addiction recovery happens as it should here at Stairway to Freedom Sober Living. Recovering addicts should not be fooled by these common myths about addiction recovery:   1. Addiction Should be Overcome with Willpower Many people seem to believe that addicts can get over their addictions simply by having the willpower to do so, but addiction recovery is about so much more than just willpower. Modern science has proven definitively that addiction is a disease, not a choice, so getting healthy goes way beyond just wanting it badly enough. 2. Addicts Deserve Punishment Entirely too many addicts have seen their lives and personal relationships destroyed by their addictions, and some see their failure to be healthy as a punishment or a sort of atonement for their sins. Lives do not get better through more substance abuse, however, and everybody deserves a shot at health and redemption. 3. Detox is an Off-ramp to Recovery Some detox patients believe that a little time at a recovery center is enough to be cured of their addiction, especially after getting through the worst of the withdrawal symptoms. Getting sober may feel like the hardest part, but it certainly is not the end of the process. Detox is just the beginning. Staying sober is an entirely different series of challenges. 4. Rehab Doesn’t Work Plenty of addicts sincerely believe that rehab is a scam, that it flat-out does not work for certain types of addicts. However, according to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, research shows one-third of people treated for alcohol abuse have no further symptoms one year later, and many others show significant progress in that same amount of time. Done right, this really can work. It certainly will not work for those addicts that never try it. 5. Medications are Dangerous for Addicts Many recovering addicts are concerned that taking medication would just be trading one addiction for another, but certain FDA-approved drugs used in the addiction process are not themselves addictive. More importantly, though, these drugs actually can work to help combat the disease, and avoiding them just because they are pills is counterproductive to recovery. 6. Relapse Means Defeat Worst of all, entirely too many patients believe that a slip up means the whole process is over and that they have lost their fight against addiction, but there are so many ways to “get back on the horse,” as they say. A relapse does not mean you have lost. The road to recovery has just hit a speed bump.   Getting sober is hard enough as it is, and myths like these only make it harder. Take advice only from professionals because if you are willing to get help, it should be from someone who is qualified to help you. Thankfully you can find those professionals right here at Stairway to Freedom Sober Living. #soberlivingchicago
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8 Things to Tell Yourself When You Want a Drink: Whether you're newly sober or have managed to stay that way for months, there are times when the urge to drink will sneak in. Knowing how to hold those urges at bay is one of the keys to sobriety. If you're struggling with wanting a drink, some of these mantras will help remind you of how far you've come and encourage you to stick to your goals and resolutions. When you want a drink, try telling yourself some of these things. 1. "Look at everything you've gained by choosing not to drink." Look around you. Even if it seems as though everything is falling apart, chances are, there are a lot of things you've gained by breaking the hold alcohol has on your life. List those benefits to yourself either in your head or out loud. You're physically healthier; you're improving relationships in your life; you feel more in control of your choices; you’ve got a great job. You don't want to throw any of that away! 2. "This will pass." Sure, there's a reason you want to drink. You'll always be able to find a reason: a really bad day, a frustrating conversation with a friend or family member, a burning need for "just one drink." When the urge hits hard, keep reminding yourself that it will pass. In another hour, another day, you'll be glad that you didn't give in to it. 3. "These are the reasons I've stopped drinking." You didn't choose to walk away from that lifestyle just because you could. You have deeply felt reasons why you've chosen sobriety. Keeping those reasons close to you can make it easier to make the right choice when the urge to drink hits hard. Consider, for example, putting a laminated list in your wallet or carrying it in your pocket. 4. "It's not just about me." There are people who care about you and who will be impacted by your decision to drink. It's not just your future that you're putting on the line; it's theirs, too. Try carrying pictures of your loved ones with that list of reasons you stopped drinking to help you remember them when it gets hard to say no. 5. "Remember when..." Chances are, there have been some memorable moments over the course of your drinking career. Most of the time, you push those memories out of mind and do your best to forget about them, and some of them you may never fully remember. When you're fighting the urge to drink, however, it's a great time to call up some of those memories and remember what it was like when you were drinking regularly. Those memories alone can be a great reminder of all the reasons you quit! 6. "I will regret this decision tomorrow." Sure, it would feel good to have a drink right now. You might even feel great in the moment. Tomorrow, however, you're going to have some serious regrets—and it's not just about the hangover. Try to step back from how you're feeling right now and make a decision that will carry you through to tomorrow. 7. "Stop!" Sometimes, the difference between taking a drink and walking away is changing your thought patterns. Visual imagery can help: a giant stop sign thrown in your path, a loved one standing in your way, or whatever it takes to change your mental trajectory and send you down a better path. 8. "I'm not helpless." It's easy to fall into the trap of feeling that, if addiction has its claws in you, there's nothing you can do to stop it. That couldn't be further from the truth! You have the power to make the right decision and retain all the good changes in your life that have come as a result of your sobriety. They wouldn't call it alcoholism if it were as easy as deciding to give it up and never having another craving. Thankfully, you're not alone in your journey. If you're looking for more tools to help you with a lifetime of sober living, contact us today to learn how we can help.   #soberlivingchicago
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Understanding How Your Mental Health Impacts Sobriety: Getting sober is a process that often starts in treatment, but it continues on long after you leave. You need to recover physically, mentally, and emotionally from the ravages of addiction. You have to learn, each day, how to navigate the ups and downs of life without the use of substances to cope. Relapse doesn't have to be a part of the process, but sometimes it is. Relapse often happens in the first weeks and months of recovery, although it can still happen years after getting sober. This is why continued recovery support and vigilance is so crucial—and why it’s so important to understand how your mental health can impact your ongoing sobriety. What Causes Relapse? There are a lot of individual factors that contribute to relapse. Often, it's a lack of support or spending time with people who use. However, in many cases, relapse is a direct result of unaddressed mental health issues. Mental illness and addiction often go hand in hand. Studies show that nearly 50 percent of those struggling with addiction also have a mental illness. Examples may include depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, PTSD, or trauma. Which Comes First? It depends. For some, the symptoms of mental illness were present before the substance abuse. For others, the mental illness came after the substance use. Either way, substance use is often an attempt to alleviate the symptoms of mental illness. The problem is that, over time, substances only make symptoms worse and more frequent. Why is Recovering From Both Disorders so Difficult? The person who is diagnosed with both addiction and mental illness is said to have a co-occurring disorder. This means that they are battling two illnesses and need help for both of them. In the past, this rarely happened. Addiction treatment centers were only interested in solving the substance abuse problem, and they frequently turned away patients who needed mental health services. Likewise, mental health facilities only addressed the mental illness at hand and would not treat addiction issues. The problem, however, was that people often returned to addiction when their mental illness symptoms returned. Today, there is a greater understanding of the link between mental health and addiction. Many substance abuse treatment centers offer services for mental illness, and vice versa. This type of treatment increases the odds of a successful recovery and long-term sobriety. Recovery Is Ongoing It's important that ongoing mental health care be a part of recovery from addiction. If you struggle with anxiety, depression, or bipolar disorder, you may experience a return of symptoms at any time. Understanding how to manage these symptoms is essential. The urge to return to substance use in order to cope with feelings of depression, panic attacks, or manic symptoms can be powerful. How Can You Maintain Your Sobriety in the Midst of a Mental Health Crisis? The first step is understanding your mental illness. Managing your symptoms often takes a team approach. It's important that you have a support system in place and that you learn how to advocate for yourself. It's also important that any doctors or counselors you have are aware of your addiction and that you are in recovery. Avoiding stressors, getting lots of support for your sobriety, and practicing self-care is another important step. Finally, have a plan so that if and when your symptoms emerge you know what to do, who to talk to, and how to get the help and support you need—not just for your mental health, but also for your sobriety. If you are in early recovery and looking for a clean and sober living environment in the Chicago area, contact us to learn more today. A sober living environment can dramatically increase your chances of staying sober after treatment and can offer you much-needed support in the early weeks and months of your sobriety. #soberlivingchicago
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Getting Help for Alcohol Addiction:   Alcoholism can be a difficult disease, in large part because its cure only comes at the hands of the person suffering from it. For those that decide they do want help, however, there are answers. Here at Stairway to Freedom Sober Living, we want to assist those individuals who are serious about getting help for their alcohol abuse. That is the first step, of course, but what comes next for those that have decided to get sober? Five Steps in Getting Help for Alcohol Addiction The following are steps one can take once they have made the decision to work toward a life beyond alcohol addition: 1. Weigh the Benefits of Quitting Those who abuse alcohol invariably have rationalizations for doing so. Those serious about sobriety first need to make a physical list weighing those reasons against the reasons for quitting. While drinking can help people have fun and forget about their problems, the costs are weighty. Quitting can improve relationships, ebb anxiety and depression, and even improve performance at work or school. This initial list of benefits vs. costs is a great way of generating some perspective. 2. Set Goals & Announce Them Next, it is important to make some goals in regard to quitting drinking. Decide a “quit date” and announce it to your friends and family so they can help hold you responsible for that goal. 3. Remove Temptations & Bad Influences In the meantime, it would be wise to start removing temptations from your home. Remove all alcohol, barware, or anything else in your house that reminds you of drinking or encourages you to drink. Furthermore, if there are friends or acquaintances in your life that you associate with your alcohol abuse, create some distance from them, too. That might mean missing events where alcohol is served or even burning some bridges, but that can be a necessary step in the process of sobriety. 4. Get Educated & Be Safe In some cases, quitting can cause some physical discomfort, including everything from headaches and nausea to anxiety, sleeplessness, and elevated blood pressure. Be aware of the withdrawal symptoms of quitting drinking, and be safe about doing so. If you have a high fever, experience seizures, or have hallucinations, call 911 or go the emergency room immediately. 5. Seek Help If all of this sounds overwhelming and perhaps a little scary, don’t forget that there is absolutely no shame in seeking help. That might mean family or friends who can help, but it also may mean visiting a treatment center. Stairway to Freedom Sober Living is a great resource for those with no idea where to turn, and we are the help many former alcohol abusers need. Of course, if any questions arise at any step of the process, the good people here at Stairway to Freedom Sober Living will be happy to answer them. The treatment of alcohol abuse is a delicate process, and our professionals know best how to approach that process. Sobriety is a lifelong endeavor, and we are eager to help those suffering from alcohol addiction, especially those that are ready to seek the help they need. #soberlivingchicago
Getting Help for Alcohol Addiction
Getting Help for Alcohol Addiction
stairwaysoberliving.com
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Five Signs That a Relapse May Be Coming: Getting sober is not easy, but staying sober can be even harder. Even people with long histories of sobriety can occasionally have doubts about how long they will be able to keep it up, but the last thing anybody wants after all that hard work is a relapse. Here at Stairway to Freedom, we want to make sure that those who find their way out of our sober living recovery homes in Chicago stay healthy. If you feel like you or someone you know is slipping, keeping an eagle eye out for the following signs of relapse could help with relapse prevention moving forward: * Growing Complacent – It can be easy for former addicts to believe they have their addictions under control, perhaps to the point that they skip certain positive habits that helped usher them toward sobriety in the first place. If someone starts eating more poorly, stops exercising, or insists that one drink or a small amount of a drug is not going to hurt them, it could be a sign that they are nearing a slip. * Failure to Deal with Increased Stress – For many people, substance abuse emerges as a crutch for dealing with stress. If someone sees increased stress in their work or personal lives and cannot figure out how to approach that stress in a healthy way, it is possible they could return to drugs or alcohol as a means of coping. * Isolation – Sober people need constant support from other loving, sober people in their lives, so if someone falls off the map and stops interacting with those positive influences in their lives, it could be a sign that they are hoping to avoid confrontation about a possible relapse. * Connecting with Old Friends – The opposite side of the social spectrum occurs when a former addict reconnects with associates who were part of their lives before sobriety. Spending time with people who were part of that old, damaging lifestyle can make it easy to slip back into that old, damaging lifestyle right along with them. * Missing Meetings – For many former addicts, a big part of sober living is attending meetings. While not everyone gets the same experience from these meetings in terms of maintaining their sobriety, a sudden pattern of skipping meetings for those that appear to need them is a major red flag for a potential relapse. Most people get at least something out of these recovery meetings, and missing them suggests that a relapse could be coming. If you or someone you care about shows any of these signs or there is any sort of fear that a slip is coming, please reach out to someone in the Stairway to Freedom community so we can prevent a relapse before it happens. We care about keeping people sober because we know how much work it is to make that happen. The easiest way to avoid having to go through it all again is nipping those feelings of doubt before they lead to a regretful mistake. #soberlivingchicago
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How Can Sober Living Facilities in Chicago Support My Emotional Health?: The early days of recovery can feel like they drag on forever. You may feel empty, depressed or like you've lost your best friend. All sorts of emotions begin to surface. Emotions that you didn't even know existed. Anger, fear, grief, shame. These feelings can rise up in your body and feel like you're being assaulted. You may feel filled with rage or like crying for hours. You may feel like you want revenge or you may experience self-loathing. When these emotions surface, it's vital to seek support and resources. Let's explore ways you can handle these uncomfortable emotions. Long-forgotten Emotions All emotions have a cause and a purpose in our lives. Each emotion serves a function that only it can do. But after years in active addiction, we start to lose our ability to identify our emotions. Sober Living Chicago Houses can bring you the support you need to safely explore the following emotions: Anger Anger is within us as a protective mechanism signifying a boundary violation. When anger arises, we must first ask ourselves, "did someone violate my boundary or did I violate my own boundary by going against my values?" Functions: Drives us to action, signals a boundary violation Tools: * Journaling about your anger- this can help calm the anger so you can see and understand it more clearly * Speaking with a trusted person or in group about the anger * If the anger is towards yourself, identifying where you violated your value code and remedy the situation- amends and self-forgiveness are ways to begin remedying the situation * If the anger is towards another person, PAUSE- allow yourself time to process your anger with a trusted other, then communicate your boundary * Identify the fear hidden beneath the anger- "what am I afraid of?" * Seek feedback from others- what do they see? How have they handled anger regarding a similar situation? Learn from others * Oftentimes, anger will dissolve after we feel listened to and validated, which is why speaking to a counselor, sponsor or peer at a Sober Living Chicago house can be so helpful Fear Underneath all anger is fear. We're afraid of losing someone or something. The two most common fears in the human experience are the fear of rejection and abandonment. Functions: Protection, survival Tools: * Journaling about your fear with two columns marked "true fear" and "imagined fear" * Speaking with a trusted person or in group- you'll find that most other people have the same fear * Seek feedback- what suggestions might they have? How have they handled a similar fear in the past? Grief It's important that we get in touch with our grief during the recovery process. It's normal to feel intense feelings of loss as we step from our half-life of addiction, into our full-life of sobriety. We need to be able to grieve and release: * Our drug-of-choice * Relationships during active addiction * Mistakes during active addiction (after taking responsibility and making amends) * Lost opportunities * Jobs Functions: Making way for the new Tools: * Welcoming the stages of grief into your life. It's all part of the process- denial, anger, bargaining, depression, acceptance * Journaling * Speaking to a trusted person or your group * Seeking feedback Shame During early recovery, we must begin to separate our healthy shame from toxic shame. Healthy shame is what we feel for hurting those we love. Healthy shame moves us to recognize the pain we caused, take responsibility and change our direction. Toxic shame is what happens when we feel unworthy, defective or damaged. This type of shame can create "shame spirals" that pull us down quickly. We need to separate the two: "I am not a bad person for making a mistake, but I did something bad and need to take responsibility for correcting it." Functions: Prompts us to change course and make amends Tools: * Journaling * Speaking with a trusted person * Seeking feedback * Making amends Loving Yourself Through It All Above all, do NOT isolate. This is a trap. Reach out. Seek support. And give yourself credit for how far you've come. Be patient with yourself. Encourage yourself. And, most importantly, love yourself, not the addiction. Sober Living Chicago Resources If you're looking for Sober Living Chicago facilities that will provide the support and accountability you need while you sort out your emotions, contact us. We are committed to helping you maintain sobriety. Give us a call today!   #soberlivingchicago
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A Halfway House Can Be Your Path to Living Sober:   Living sober matters, but it can be a struggle if you don't have the right resources and support. If you've ever searched for "halfway house near me" and come up empty, you know it can be a bad feeling. Where are you supposed to get the help you need once you leave the detox or drug treatment facility? If you live in the Chicago area, you have options. Stairway to Freedom offers Recovery Homes in that area, so you can have a safe and structured environment to start rebuilding your life. By the time you go to drug treatment or alcohol detox, a lot of damage may have already been done to your life, and fixing that takes time. Choosing a Halfway House In some areas there may not be too many options for halfway houses, but why should you choose one in the first place? These houses are excellent choices for anyone who has left a detox or treatment center and isn't quite ready for independent living just yet. After drug or alcohol treatment, many people struggle to find jobs and secure safe and comfortable housing because of their past mistakes. They may have damaged their credit and finances, along with their relationships with the people closest to them. A halfway house can give them the chance to get back on track, so they can work and live independently again. Following the Rules Matters Halfway houses are very strict, with a deep commitment to living sober. When you search for "halfway house near me" and decide living there is right for you, remember that rules will have to be followed. There is no allowance for drugs or alcohol in these locations, and most Chicago halfway houses have rules about curfews and visitors, as well. Anyone who lives there is expected to pitch in and help, and is also expected to take steps toward moving their life forward in a positive direction. If you aren't ready to do those things and can't commit to the importance of them, a halfway house may not be the right choice for you. Independent Living is on the Horizon When you live at a Chicago halfway house, you have the opportunity to start rebuilding your life. Take that opportunity and focus on it, because it's a very important way for you to get a second chance. Even if you feel you've made too many mistakes or you can never get things turned around, there are always options and choices to be made. Finding a job and saving money is part of that, along with the potential to rebuild relationships with friends and family members who may have backed away during your struggle with drugs or alcohol. A job and better relationships can help lead to independent living once again. Don't Be Afraid to Ask for Help No matter what kind of situation you find yourself in, help is available. Once you go through drug treatment or are released from a detox facility, a halfway house can be exactly the help you need. It gives you a transition period between the facility you were in and an independent living situation, which gives you a way to rebuild without needing to do everything all at once. It can also keep you from having to sleep on the street if you don't yet have the means to rent a place or you don't have a job that pays enough to live independently. Getting to the point where you do have those things is what a halfway house is about. Sober living is a journey, and how you get there is up to you. But with a halfway house to go to you know you have a safe place to sleep. It also gives you a sense of home and community, and others who understand where you've been and what you're going through. That sense of belonging can go a very long way toward helping you build an independent life once again.     #soberlivingchicago
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