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Stace Dumoski
211 followers -
Creative, mostly with words
Creative, mostly with words

211 followers
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Blogging Monday away....

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I couldn't even come up with a clever title for this City of Bridges installment, but after a year and a half I figured it didn't matter. Hopefully the next one won't take as long, and it will be much more entertaining!

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  i. Green is something special in California. Oh,sure, we have “green all year” because people can water their lawns and gardens to keep them vibrant, and there’s no white blanket of snow to cover them up. But in the wild hills that frame our developed…

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It's impossible to let the new year go by without a blog post, no matter how bad a blogger I've been!

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I've seen pictures of these before, but never seen an explanation for how they are formed. Beautiful collection!

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Horses.
Photo of the Day: "The [horses] watched us as we watched them, each of us surprised by the others' presence. It was over in seconds, yet forever frozen with a single click," writes #YourShot member Charlotte Goss of this image. #photography

This video...

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Not the first time I've read about this mom's experience with her daughter and Girl Bilbo - I loved the whole idea, but I recall a few outraged responses along the lines of "how dare anyone change what someone else created?" This piece really addresses that issue, and highlights the fluidity of stories through time. Maybe because it's I cut my teeth on the Arthurian legends, and trained as a folklorist, but it seems natural to me that any story that means something in the way that Tolkien's does is going to be internalized, metamorphosed, and spat back out. Great stories can't be owned - or rather, we each want to own them in our own way. 

Added to that is the whole issue of female representation in these great stories. The author concludes her article with these paragraphs: 

"For me, the most fascinating part of literary genderswapping is its illumination of my own assumptions. Not long ago, my daughter and I read an Ursula K Le Guin novel with a young male hero. When we switched the pronouns, I found myself pleasantly but repeatedly surprised by our heroine’s independence. She journeyed alone, building her own boats, casting her own spells, and passing tests of strength and wits as she confronted dragons and shadows.

"Of course she can do that, I thought. Of course she should be able to. But I was raised on Boy Bilbo, and on a million other stories where boys – usually white, usually English-speaking, usually straight – assume the lead. If I wrote a girl-centric adventure story for my daughter, I might reflexively throw in a male companion, or put our heroine on an easier path. By switching pronouns, though, my daughter and I met a heroine who pushed the boundaries of both our imaginations and took us on a truly unexpected journey."

We're still a long way from a place where we can assume that girls in stories will have the same agency and independence that boys have always enjoyed. Genderswapping the classics provides a model that can be used to change preconceptions in a very essential way - and it in no way diminishes the work of the original creator. On the contrary, it only proves how important that work was to begin with. 

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Edited by my brilliant friend +Nin Harris 
New calls for submissions! Delinquent's Spice & Truancy are two microzines focused on diverse, inclusive and hybrid retellings of folktales/fairytales. Delinquent's Spice (hypertext, collaborative storytelling project:formerly Demeter's Spicebox)'s reading period opens in October. Truancy's reading period is now open. Do check it out.
Submissions calls for two new folk and fairytale microzines: http://delinquentspice.com
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