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Saint Michael & All Angels Episcopal Church
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Read Katherine's sermon preached July 8, 2018.

After Jesus was ill-received in his own town, he went out among the villages teaching. Rejection, although it’s an outside force, can set in motion internal questioning of oneself, and Jesus is momentarily astonished. He then uses their rejection to catalyze fresh ministry. Because he knows firsthand how it can sabotage and eat at one’s soul, he prepares them for rejection, and gives them a way to deal with it. This is how he sends the disciples off on their mission—these twelve who know him best, who do believe. He empowers them and charges them with work which until then had been his own—he instructs them and even gives them their ‘packing list’ for the journey. Mark’s Gospel is the only one which says they are to wear sandals and take a staff. So perhaps he is linking their journey with that of the faithful Israelites eating the Passover meal before departing from Egypt, standing in their sandals ready to leave with their staff in hand—a new call to follow God and live out that call is beginning...
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Read Katherine's sermon preached July 1, 2018.

As Mark’s gospel resumes we continue to see ongoing chaos as the setting for story after story. Each time Jesus is right in the middle of it, be it storms, crowds following him, those seeking healing, or authorities trying to challenge or destroy him. Each time his presence brings the promise of the kingdom of God right into the middle of these turbulent scenes, inviting us to wonder how often we miss seeing that God with us in our world of chaos. Amidst coercive crowds and waves of judgement-based fear around us, are we awake to watching for Christ in those around us? Do we go with the crowd or do we stop and look for the opportunity to plant seeds of healing, love, generosity and peace? Today one story is within another, they reinforce and interpret each other, like a two people filling in details of a single story one intercalates the other and in doing so enriches both, so we’re going to go back and forth between these to better know them...
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Read Katherine's sermon preached June 24, 2018.

A storm of utter chaos at the border, people in fear and desperation, faith questioned and lives imperiled. Yes, this is the gospel reading today, and it is also the news headlines of recent weeks. This section of Mark’s gospel continues the theme of the power of God’s kingdom to change human life, and if you’ve ever doubted the relevance of scripture to our life, doubt no more. This is not just a nature miracle of Jesus calming a storm, it takes us all the way back to Genesis; creation made from the formless void of waters, and even in Mark’s day, storms symbolized chaos to be feared. Jesus awakens, and facing the storm he acts as God did at the dawn of creation, mastering the forces of that chaos impeding creative generativity. We’ve just left the parable of the tiny mustard seed becoming something great, and here the kingdom of God which might have seemed small and weak now has power to rebuke the powers of the storm, to show the power of creator God sufficient to rule the universe. Of course they ask “Who can this be?” when even the wind and sea obey him!
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The kingdom of heaven is like...

The prophet Ezekiel’s words of judgment can be strong, even harsh, he can also speak renewal in images just as powerful, proclaiming forgiveness and restoration. In today’s reading he offers an image of hope and blessing as he converts an image of judgment into an image of grace. Here he rehabilitates an earlier riddle of an eagle plucking off the top of a cedar tree, carrying it away and replanting it....
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What does Jesus have to say about mental health? Read Katherine's sermon preached June 10, 2018, and find out.
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Read Katherine's message preached June 3, 2018!

Our psalm today is one of only a few psalms which come out of northern Israel, and after the fall of the northern kingdom in 721 BC. It found its way into the psalms of the Temple at Jerusalem. It is really a prophetic liturgy in itself. It begins as a festal hymn of joyous urging to praise the strong God of Jacob with music of voices and instruments, calling for exuberant praise and worship. By verse 4 this ritual of noisy celebratory praise is revealed as a command for Israel and leading us to know it is the act of joyful music and praise that’s most important, not the specific words one might use. Today, we will continue to uphold that perspective in our repeatedly singing that first line as an antiphon, “Sing with joy to God our strength.”
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Read Katherine's sermon for Pentecost, May 20, 2018.

What an exquisitely spirited weekend this is! We come to celebrate Pentecost, The team worked incredibly hard these past weeks to get ready for upcoming construction, we break ground for our new parking lot, and we Episcopalians get to feel joyful pride at having our own Presiding Bishop, The Most Reverend Michael Curry preach at the royal wedding yesterday (from an iPad no less!). It was a wonderful sermon—I hope if you’ve not already seen it you’ll take some time this week to do so. His words about the power of love rang out strong and true and filled with hope...
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Read Katherine's message for May 13, 2018.

ou’ve been hearing about next week’s Pentecost and groundbreaking celebration, when we’ll wear red and orange and yellow – flame colors symbolic of the coming of the Holy Spirit to the Apostles, as she appeared like flames above each of them as the received the gift of the Holy Spirit. Today is the last Sunday of Eastertide, and this past Thursday was Ascension, when the church honors Jesus’ post-resurrection ascent to heaven. We are between Easter, Ascension and Pentecost, which means we’re in the middle of much lively change, both in our church year and in our life as a congregation. We have not yet left Eastertide, nor entered Pentecost, so we are in that waiting place. I often want to see it as a straight path with milestones or scenic views, like ‘Christmas up ahead” or “City of Easter in 6 Lenten miles!”—maybe even “Warning, Pentecost crowd and fire hazard—slow down!” Alas, that clarity is not before us...
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Read Katherine's sermon preached May 6, 2018.

This passage from John’s gospel is dearly loved and points us towards the change in Jesus’ relationship with the disciples—both of greater demand and greater love. Here he shifts them from being his disciples to being friends. It includes a line which can be troubling because it sounds like Jesus is saying their friendship is conditional; “You are my friends if you do what I command you.”
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Read Katherine's sermon preached Apr. 29, 2018.

The Eunuch whom Philip the deacon and evangelist encounters, looks at the water and says, “What is to prevent me from being baptized?” I admit I’m a bit envious that the queen’s treasurer, someone out on the road, asks Philip, “What is to prevent me from being baptized?” Outside of this community, many of the conversations I have with people about faith and baptism are from the reverse perspective; ‘why should I get baptized?’ —as if I can argue them into it or offer Jesus up as the simplistic answer to all that they think is wrong with their lives...
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