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Long-term care insurance distributors and educators, recommend preemptive action against the impact of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. “Cognitive decline is a big and growing reason Americans need long-term care,” says Denise Gott, CEO, “and the best time to plan for it is before symptoms arise.” “Think of it this way,” she explains. “If you’re worried about your house burning down, you wouldn’t wait for smoke and flames before getting fire insurance or removing fire hazards.” When it comes to Alzheimer’s, most Americans fail to appreciate its danger and avail themselves of sensible precautions. Here are three guidelines: 1. Recognize the size of the problem. The Alzheimer’s Association reports that one in three seniors dies with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia. Five million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s, and the number is expected to triple as millions of Baby Boomers enter their retirement years. Alzheimer’s is a progressive and fatal disease. Over time, more and more longer-living Americans may lose the ability to care for themselves. Millions will need long-term care. And they may need it for an extended period. Many dementia victims require LTC for seven to ten years or more, while others typically need care for about three years. 2. Determine whether insurance is the right option. Medicare does not cover many services that are needed by people living with dementia. Medicaid does provide substantial help, but only for those lacking the financial means to help themselves. If you fall into this category, public assistance may be your best bet. Otherwise, providing care is up to you. If you’re very wealthy, you may choose to self-insure. If you’re not rich but doing OK, private insurance may be your best option. An LTC policy lets productive family members keep on with their jobs and lives. Nobody has to become default caregiver, a role usually filled by a wife, daughter, or other female relative. 3. If LTC insurance makes sense for you, consult with a dementia-aware advisor. LTC agents are state-certified, but there’s no legal requirement they know anything about dementia. So it’s up to you to pick one who does. Ask questions such as, “How many years of care should my policy cover?” and “What mental or physical disabilities trigger benefits?” For more information on Alzheimer’s and memory care, contact Spring Arbor. #HowYouLive Massachusetts News Wire
Long-term care insurance distributors and educators, recommend preemptive action against the impact of Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia. “Cognitive decline is a big and growing reason Americans need long-term care,” says Denise Gott, CEO, “and the best time to plan for it is ...
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The most important thing you can do is plan ahead If you have concerns about the ability of an aging parent or relative to live independently, you may want to investigate assisted living—and sooner rather than later. The best time to look is six months to a year before your parent will need to make the move. If you wait until your parent is being discharged from a hospital or rehab center, you'll have fewer choices. And, as an investigation we conducted a few years ago clearly showed, finding a good, safe, and affordable facility can be problematic due to states hodgepodge system of licensing, inspection, and staff training standards of varying strictness. Assisted-living facilities are residential units that sometimes include a kitchen, housekeeping, meals, transportation to doctors and activities, and various levels of personal assistance. More than 900,000 Americans now live in about 39,500 assisted-living facilities, according to estimates, but there is no federal oversight of the industry. Each state sets its own definition of assisted living and decides what licensing procedures and inspections are required. One result is that there are more than 26 designations used to refer to what is commonly known as assisted living, including "residential care," "board and care," "adult home," and "retirement residence." The following game plan will help you find the best facility for an aging relative. Is assisted living appropriate? Your first step is to make an honest appraisal of whether your relative can continue to live at home. If he or she needs only a minimum of help and dislikes the idea of moving, home care might be a better choice. But for gregarious people who are beginning to experience a decline in function, assisted living might be a good option. For help assessing your relative's physical, mental, and financial situation, consider consulting a geriatric-care manager, who should be knowledgeable about the assisted-living options in your area, including the facilities' financial strength. You can search for one on the National Association of Professional Geriatric Care Managers website, at www.caremanager.org.  You can also get recommendations from family doctors or local senior centers. Several websites provide information on nearby facilities.  SnapforSeniors senior housing locator seems to be comprehensive, and it has some good information on long-term-care and funding options, too.  NewLifeStyles.com. does not require you to enter personal information on the site, and it doesn't make referrals, which prevents lots of annoying phone calls later. Once you have a list of facilities, make an appointment to visit them with your parent or relative. You can find a checklist of things to look for and questions to ask. Your first tour will probably be led by the director of marketing. You will see the common areas and available apartments. Notice if the facility's décor suits your parent's taste, but don't let that be the deciding factor. Nice chandeliers and fancy furniture don't provide good care. Of course, the place should be clean and well lit. Look for safety features like grab bars on all the walls, including the hallways, and nonslip flooring materials, especially in the bathrooms. Try to have a meal while you're there to check out the food. Watch for red flags Observe the interaction between staff members and residents. Is it cheerful and respectful? Do staff members seem genuinely interested in the residents? If you see few residents in the common areas or participating in activities, it might signal that the facility is not full, which could bode ill for its financial stability. Get a copy of the admissions contract and the residence rules. If you sense reluctance by administrators to part with such information at this early stage, consider it a red flag. The facility's contract outlines fees, services provided, and residents' rights, and explains who will handle medications, when reassessments of a resident's condition take place, and when a resident might be asked to leave because he or she needs more services than the facility provides. The contract should also specify whether a resident is allowed to return to the same unit after a hospital stay. Nursing homes are required to hold a room for Medicaid patients, but many assisted-living facilities are not. Make sure that yours will. Return unannounced several times to your top two or three choices. Visit at different times of day, especially around mealtimes and the early evening to see how they are managed at busy and quiet times. Ask to speak with the residence administrator. Even if it means coming back for another appointment, this is important. He or she is the person who sets the mood and philosophy of the whole place.When you meet, ask to review the facility's licensing or certification inspection report. This should be readily available to the general public and will outline any complaints or black marks the residence has received during inspections. Ask how any problems were corrected. Also ask about who will draw up the care plan for your relative and how much input he or she and the family will have. Find out how the facility will accommodate your relative's current and future needs. For example, someone with diet-controlled diabetes might eventually need insulin. How will the facility handle that? Find out how many employees are assigned to each resident. And look for a facility that has a licensed nurse on duty or on call at all times. Ask about the staff's training in such areas as safety, emergency care, first aid, mental health, residents' rights, and medication administration. Add up the costs carefully When you've narrowed the field to one, review the fees. Note the costs for any extra services your relative will need, policies regarding the return of a deposit or down payment, costs involved during hospitalizations, and the possibility of unexpected rate increases. Most costs for assisted living have to be paid out-of-pocket. Make sure you take into account the possibility of added costs if your relative needs more assistance than the level covered in the base rate. For example, if more help is needed with what are known as instrumental activities of daily living, such as medication management. Contact your state's long-term-care ombudsman, who acts as an independent resident advocate. He or she will have a record of complaints lodged against a facility and how they were handled. You can find your state's contact information through the National Long-Term Care Ombudsman Resource Center, atltcombudsman.org, or by calling 202-332-2275. Finally, have the contract reviewed by an attorney before you sign it. You can find one in your area who specializes in elder-care issues on the website of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys, at naela.org. For more information on assisted living, contact Spring Arbor. #HowYouLive Consumer Reports
The most important thing you can do is plan ahead. If you have concerns about the ability of an aging parent or relative to live independently, you may want to investigate assisted living—and sooner rather than later. The best time to look is six months to a year before your parent will need to ...
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Primary care physicians with patients who support loved ones with Alzheimer’s disease should be aware of both the financial and health-related tolls involved with taking on such responsibilities, as a new report has indicated that Alzheimer’s caregivers are 28% more likely to eat less or go hungry, and one-fifth sacrifice their own medical care. The 2016 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures report states that nearly 50% of those who provide dementia-related care for friends or family members with Alzheimer’s disease cut back on their own expenses to take on the cost. That often means spending less on their own food, transportation and medical care, and can sometimes lead them to quit their job or reduce their own hours to make time to provide the necessary care. “The devastating emotional and physical effects of caring for a person with Alzheimer’s disease have been well studied,” Beth Kallmyer, MSW, vice president of constituent services for the Alzheimer’s Association, said. However, this new report shows, for the first time, the enormous personal and financial sacrifices that millions of care contributors make every day. These sacrifices jeopardize the financial security of individuals and families, as well as their access to basic needs and health care.” According to the report, 5.4 million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease, with nearly 16 million family members and friends of patients acting as caregivers, providing either financial, physical or emotional support. On average, these contributors spent more than $5,000 of their own money per year to care for loved ones with Alzheimer’s disease, the report said. In addition, two out of three caregivers incorrectly believe, or are not sure, that Medicare will help them cover the cost of a nursing home. According to the report, only 3% of adults in the United States have long-term care insurance, which may help cover the costs. The report also states that one-third of caregivers reported having to reduce their hours at work or quit their job, leading to an average loss of income of approximately $15,000 compared to the previous year. Also, 11% reported reducing their spending on their children’s education in order to care for loved ones with Alzheimer’s disease. Along with the report, the Alzheimer’s Association released a series of recommendations for caregivers, including: * using retirement planning as a time to think about how best to prepare for the need for long-term or dementia-related care; * conducting a personal financial resource inventory, reviewing savings, insurance, benefits and available assistance; * looking into local long-term care services; and, * contacting the local Agency on Aging to determine what community services and support programs are available. “Our findings show that very few people are prepared for the cost of caring for someone with Alzheimer’s, which is the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States and is expected to nearly triple in prevalence by 2050,” Kallmyer said. “It is imperative for our health care system and the financial security of millions of Americans that we help people understand the full costs associated with Alzheimer’s disease, and more importantly, that we provide practical steps to mitigate these costs.” The full 2016 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures report is available at http://alz.org/facts. For more information on Alzheimer’s care, contact Spring Arbor. #HowYouLive Healio
Primary care physicians with patients who support loved ones with Alzheimer's disease should be aware of both the financial and health-related tolls involved with taking on such responsibilities, as a new report has indicated that Alzheimer's caregivers are 28% more likely to eat less or go ...
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At Spring Arbor, our philosophy is to make every day special for our residents suffering from Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. Our Cottage Care Coordinators are dedicated to providing a high quality of life for all residents through a range of activities to exercise both the mind and the body. Our residents are encouraged to rekindle old interests or develop new ones. As a result, we are always discovering new and invigorating ways to engage and stimulate our residents. We’re excited to begin offering gardening therapy for memory care residents! Research shows that access to the outdoors and physical activity can be extremely beneficial for adults living with memory loss. That is why we are so excited to add gardening to our educational and training programs in our Memory Care Cottages! Recently, our Cottage Care Coordinators gathered for a two-day training program in Durham, North Carolina to find ways for gardening to become a weekly activity for the residents in all of our Spring Arbor Cottage communities. With instruction from a Horticultural Therapist, our Cottage Care Coordinators learned how to bring nature to our Cottage residents through gardening and the stimulating sensory opportunities that we create in each Cottage courtyard. According to the Alzheimer’s Society, gardening demonstrates several benefits for those with dementia including: * Provides great exercise for the mind and body * Creates a sense of purpose * Lowers stress and blood pressure levels * Reduces aggression in those who have Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia * Builds confidence by allowing the resident to experience success * Helps recall long-term memories of gardening We’re excited to offer this new program as one more example of our vision “To improve the world and how people live by creating meaningful experiences and places of great distinction.” To learn more about our Spring Arbor Memory Care Cottages, please visit us. #HowYouLive
At Spring Arbor, our philosophy is to make every day special for our residents suffering from Alzheimer's disease or dementia. Our Cottage Care Coordinators are dedicated to providing a high quality of life for all residents through a range of activities to exercise both the mind and the body.
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You’ve probably heard somebody say, “assisted living is the new nursing home.” A new study suggests that, in important ways, it is true. People living in residential care communities, including assisted living, care homes, or adult group homes, look a lot like those who once lived in nursing homes. They suffer from serious chronic conditions, need assistance with daily activities such as bathing or dressing, and many visit emergency departments or are hospitalized over the course of a year. More than 730,000 people lived in these communities in 2010. That’s about half as many as lived in nursing homes. But the nursing home population declined by about 20% from 2000 to 2010, while residential care, which operates with few federal regulations and is often much less costly, has seen a boom in population. More than eight in ten people living in these facilities are over 75, and more than half are older than 85. Two thirds lived in these facilities for at least one year, and one-third were residents for four years or more. The average length of stay was more than 2.5 years. The cost? For facilities that care only for dementia patients, the annual cost approached $54,000 in 2010.  Facilities without dedicated dementia units cost about $35,000 annually. Most residents pay out of pocket. About one-in–five received some Medicaid benefits in 2010 (although new Medicaid is now paying for more assisted living under home and community based waivers, a change that is likely to increase that percentage). More than 40% of residents have Alzheimer’s disease or some other dementia, and one-third have heart disease. Two-thirds need help with bathing and half need assistance getting dressed. More than one-third will visit a hospital emergency department over the course of a year, and one-quarter will be admitted to the hospital. It’s no surprise that with residents this frail, nearly all residential care communities employ personal care aides and one-third have at least one nurse on staff. Of the 31,000 residential care facilities in the US, half have 10 beds or less. Those small facilities are far more common in the west, where two-thirds have less than 10 beds. By contrast, in the northeast, nearly three-quarters have 25 beds or more. Nationwide, more than 80 percent are private, for-profit facilities. Except for people who need a high level of medical or skilled nursing care, these residential care facilities increasingly are the institutional living choice of consumers—at least for those who can afford to pay out-of-pocket. They tend to be more comfortable than nursing homes, less regimented, and more home-like. Because they are less regulated, they often cost less. But residents may not have necessary quality and safety consumer protections. There is wide variation in quality, cost, and skill level of staff. Some residents pay for private duty aides to supplement the limited services provided by facility staff. For those who do, the cost can meet or even exceed the cost of a nursing home. The CDC snapshot of residential care is a useful benchmark for consumers. But, as always, if you are thinking of this kind of care for a loved one, nothing is better than a personal visit. For more information on residential care for your loved one, contact Spring Arbor. #HowYouLive Forbes
You've probably heard somebody say, “assisted living is the new nursing home.” A new study suggests that, in important ways, it is true. People living in residential care communities, including assisted living, care homes, or adult group homes, look a lot like those who once lived in nursing ...
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Dementia is a growing challenge for the nation’s aging population. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, dementia is an overall term for a wide range of symptoms associated with a decline in memory or other cognitive skills, with Alzheimer’s disease accounting for 60 to 80 percent of cases. Regardless of the type of dementia, most of the afflicted lose their ability to remain independent and eventually require special residential care. One-in-three seniors will die with the illness. Finding the right dementia facility is a job no family wants to face, but it makes all the difference in a loved one’s care. Symptoms can begin slowly, and caregiving at home becomes incrementally more difficult. That’s why family members should plan ahead to visit several facilities. They should talk to staff, residents and other families, ask to see a facility’s latest inspection report, and visit at different times of the day, including meal time. As dementia develops, you go from managing by task to managing by the minute. No one looks after those caregivers. The concern is about the families as much as the loved one. The risk becomes high for heart attack, stroke, exhaustion and even injury for the person in charge. You still need to enjoy your life. If you keep giving and giving, then soon you both need care. You can lose your identity and who you are while focusing on someone else’s needs. In addition to relieving stress, good dementia communities offer care and companionship that the patient can’t get at home. Programs like physical therapy, activities that challenge memory, and social gatherings can help with symptoms and make the disease easier to live with. So families choosing a care facility should ask whether they are encouraged to participate in care planning for their loved one, whether activities are designed to meet residents’ specific needs, and whether activities are held on weekends and evenings. Living in a safe place, where wandering is prevented by locked doors and supervision, helps prevent accidents and the confusion of being outdoors alone. Along with safety features, families should check whether a facility allows easy freedom of movement, has rooms for residents that are clean and spacious, and has space set aside for family visits. Families also should ask about dementia support groups. Being around other people is perhaps the biggest advantage to memory care communities. It can be both a motivator and a social stimulus. A patient may arrive not wanting to use their walker, but when they see everyone else doing it, it’s OK. For more information on dementia and memory care, contact Spring Arbor. #HowYouLive www.centredaily.com
Dementia is a growing challenge for the nation's aging population. According to the Alzheimer's Association, dementia is an overall term for a wide range of symptoms associated with a decline in memory or other cognitive skills, with Alzheimer's disease accounting for 60 to 80 percent of cases.
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Losing cognitive functions are a normal part of aging. An 80-year-old may not remember as sharply as a 20-year-old, but doctors have some advice on how to keep the brain sharp and boast mental capabilities. From exercise and diet to stress reduction, here are some ways to keep your brain young and functioning well. EXERCISE Studies have shown that physical activity and exercise are associated with less cognitive decline as you age. A recent observational study published in the American Academy of Neurology asked a group of individuals to describe their physical activity. The people in this group took a brain MRI and did cognitive testing throughout the years. “Essentially people who recorded doing moderate to heavy physical activity actually had better cognitive performance than people who recorded doing light or no activity,” said Dr. Clinton Wright, one of the doctors who conducted the study. Observational studies don’t prove causation, but they do support the idea. “We know that when we exercise, blood pressure and blood flow increase everywhere in the body including the brain and we know that more blood means more energy and oxygen.” That makes our brain perform better and also helps make the rest of our body perform better. Exercise helps increase the number of small blood vessels that bring blood to the brain and build the connection between the nerve cell and the brain, so those are important ways to keep your brain healthy. It is also important to keep vascular risk factors checked and well treated. People who smoke, have hypertension, diabetes or high cholesterol have shown more mental decline. Those things damage the brain, just like they damage the heart and the kidneys. That damage to the brain has cognitive consequences. Keep your brain active You have to think of your brain like it’s a muscle. Exercise it. Mental activity is the single-biggest predictor of staying sharp as you get older. For example, if you retired at 55 and watch television all day, your brain at 60 will be like an active person’s brain at 80. Keeping your brain active helps older people handle new challenges. Many elderly people must deal with technological difficulties like online banking and bill paying, managing medications through a website and viewing public transportation information. Doctors advise everyone to get enough sleep, avoid stress and eat a healthy diet. These factors strongly correlate with good brain function as one ages. “If you can do all that stuff, that’s great.” “Do as much of it as possible, it’s better than not doing it at all.” It is also important to treat depression through antidepressant medication, stress reduction and psychotherapy. Depression is common in older people. It’s also very treatable. The takeaway: What’s good for the heart is often good for the brain. For more information, contact Spring Arbor. #HowYouLive  miamiherald.com
Losing cognitive functions are a normal part of aging. An 80-year-old may not remember as sharply as a 20-year-old, but doctors have some advice on how to keep the brain sharp and boast mental capabilities. From exercise and diet to stress reduction, here are some ways to keep your brain young ...
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Beyond adding joy to grandparent’s lives babysitting grandchildren has now been shown to increase cognitive functions and reduce the risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s according to a new study published by the journal of the North American Menopause Society (Source). The study which followed 120 grandparents found grandmothers who babysat one day per week scored higher on a range of cognitive tests. One caveat, filed under “everything in moderation” found that grandmother’s that babysat five or more days per week performed lower on cognitive tests. There is a wide body of research that shows regular social interaction helps seniors stay mentally healthier. Many grandparents report increased levels of life satisfaction from minding grandchildren stemming from feeling needed and increased life purpose to more importantly giving and receiving love. For more information on memory care, contact Spring Arbor. #HowYouLive TIPHERO
Beyond adding joy to grandparent's lives babysitting grandchildren has now been shown to increase cognitive functions and reduce the risk of dementia and Alzheimer's according to a new study published by the journal of the North American Menopause Society (Source). The study which followed 120 ...
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The biggest risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease are aging and genetic predisposition. That is, all of our risks go up as we get older, and those with certain genetic variants are also at heightened risk. But aside from these factors that we can’t control, there are some things that we do in the way of activities and lifestyle, which seem to affect our risk, both for better and for worse. Research has found that different factors are linked to Alzheimer’s disease, depending on how they influence our neurology, metabolisms, immune systems and cardiovascular systems. The caveat is that while they may not affect whether plaques and tangles accumulate in our brains, they may at least affect the speed with which they do, the age at which they do and our ability to cope with them. Here are the things studies suggest may actually affect our risk of Alzheimer’s down the road. Diet Food has long been thought to be linked to brain health. It’s not totally clear whether specific foods can reduce a person’s risk of Alzheimer’s, but overall diet may have an effect. For instance fish was linked to reduced risk for Alzheimer’s, but only for those with a strong genetic predisposition. On the other hand, some researchers say there’s no really convincing evidence that any one food alone can affect anyone’s risk across the board. But again, one’s whole diet may have an effect, at least on how and when symptoms onset, over the years. In fact, the central aim of the MIND diet, ranked high by U.S. News and World Reports in ease of follow-ability and healthiness, is to reduce one’s risk of dementia. A study showed that people who followed the diet most closely over about 4.5 years cut their risk of dementia by over 50%. Those who followed it even moderately were at a 35% reduced risk. According to the diet, the foods to eat in abundance are: Green leafy vegetables; any other types of vegetable; nuts; berries, and in particular blueberries; beans; whole grains; fish; poultry; olive oil; and a little wine. And those to avoid: Red meats, butter and stick margarine, cheese, pastries and other sweets, and fried or fast food. Diet as a whole may reduce one’s symptoms of dementia or delay onset, but it’s unlikely that eating fish or blueberries alone, if you’re not doing other things as well, will do much at all. Exercise The connection between exercise and brain health is quite strong, and the research keeps confirming it. Exercise increases blood flow and oxygen to the brain, which may underlie the connection. It also seems to help generate new neurons, particularly in the brain’s hippocampus, the area that governs learning and memory, and which is known to lose volume with age–and in Alzheimer’s disease. Some studies have found that in people with genetic risk for the disease, exercise may help preserve the volume of the hippocampus over time. Others have suggested that exercise may delay the onset or reduce the risk of the disease later in life. Though researchers are loath to say it will unequivocally reduce a person’s risk, it certainly seems like a good candidate in preventing Alzheimer’s disease in general. Heart Health And what may really explain the link between exercise and dementia is the undeniable connection between the heart and the brain–so that what’s good for the one is good for the other, and what hurts the one hurts the other. Smoking, for instance, is linked to heart attack and to dementia–so are being overweight, obese, sedentary, having high blood pressure and having diabetes. So doing right by your heart in all the ways we know about–food, lifestyle choices and exercise–will do well for your brain as well. In other words, exercise–and, in some sense, most of these lifestyle factors–may boil down the cardiovascular connection. There’s even been some evidence that coffee is linked to reduced dementia risk, but it may just be its connection to cardiovascular health, which it’s been shown to have in recent years. Education/mental activity We often hear that crosswords and Sudoku can stave off dementia, but there’s been mixed evidence about how activities like these really affect risk. A recent study reported that Alzheimer’s in people who had at least a high school education has declined over the years, relative to those who had less education, suggesting that education may have some protective effect. Another new study finds that people who were educated, stayed mentally active in middle age and who had higher genetic risk for Alzheimer’s had less amyloid plaque buildup in their brains It’s best if mental stimulation is a lifelong endeavor, rather than a late-in-life one, since at that point it may be too little too late. The key thing to keep in mind with these sorts of activities is that they invariably originate from exposure and lifestyle choices early in life so that late life cognitive and social activities are invariably reflections of life-long activities. Presumably these activities can stimulate the development of new and enriched brain connectivity, which in turn might protect a person from becoming demented by increasing the amount of reserve that the brain possesses. In other words, people with more education or richer intellectual lives may be able to better withstand the effects of Alzheimer’s, since they have more reserves to use when the disease hits. Mental health For reasons that aren’t totally understood, mental health issues like depression and chronic stress have been linked to Alzheimer’s disease in some studies. It’s not totally clear which came first, the chicken or the egg. It could be that depression and stress are actually very early symptoms of the disease–or it could be that either one alone actually raises the risk for dementia, because of the ways in which they change or inflame the brain. Or perhaps experiencing mental health issues just makes a person less resilient, just like mental activity makes a person more so. But taking care of your mental health, whether or not it’s linked to dementia, is always important. So these are some of the ways in which lifestyle can affect risk. Some research has suggested that incorporating healthy lifestyle factors and reducing the bad ones could reduce the risk of dementia by up to two-thirds. Whether it would be that much is unclear, but doing the good things we know to do will very likely help. We may not know by how much they’ll help, but at this point, we do know that they do. For more information, contact Spring Arbor. #HowYouLive Forbes
The biggest risk factors for Alzheimer's disease are aging and genetic predisposition. That is, all of our risks go up as we get older, and those with certain genetic variants are also at heightened risk. But aside from these factors that we can't control, there are some things that we do in the ...
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Construction on HHHunt’s first standalone memory care community, Spring Arbor of Salisbury Memory Care, is well underway! When complete, this new memory care community will accommodate 48 residents and will add 40 new Spring Arbor team members, each with extensive training in the areas of Alzheimer’s and dementia.  The 48,275-square foot building in Midlothian, Virginia is adjacent to Spring Arbor of Salisbury, one of HHHunt’s six existing senior living communities in Virginia. At HHHunt, we believe it’s how you live that matters and that is why we are so excited for this beautiful memory care community to open this fall.  As with all Spring Arbor communities, Spring Arbor of Salisbury Memory Care will provide personalized senior care in a nurturing and compassionate environment.  Strong emphasis will be placed on our “Cornerstones of Care,” “Art from the Heart,” and “Hearts & Harmony” programs as we recognize that through art, music and movement, we can stimulate the brain and allow our residents to communicate and express themselves in creative and meaningful ways.  Each program brings an un-paralleled quality and dignity to the life of our residents while simultaneously producing confidence, trust, and peace of mind for their loved ones. Spring Arbor of Salisbury Memory Care is not the only memory care news from HHHunt. We’re proud to announce that even more growth is planned for 2016! HHHunt is currently building memory care cottages at Spring Arbor of Durham in Durham, North Carolina and at Spring Arbor of Albemarle in Albemarle, North Carolina. We are looking forward to all of this exciting expansions. In the coming weeks, we’ll take a deeper look at Spring Arbor’s plans for 2016 and its growth since opening the first Spring Arbor community in 1992. Stay tuned! #HowYouLive
Construction on HHHunt's first standalone memory care community, Spring Arbor of Salisbury Memory Care, is well underway! When complete, this new memory care community will accommodate 48 residents and will add 40 new Spring Arbor team members, each with extensive training in the areas of ...
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The figures are stunning, but they are true: In less than 10 years, almost 400,000 people in North Carolina will have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. No wonder that the N.C. Institute of Medicine makes Alzheimer’s a top priority. The Institute and advocates are pushing for legislative action to invest more in help for Alzheimer’s victims and their families, particularly those loved ones who care for people they’re trying to keep in comfort at home. The state currently is shortchanging them, with a cut to a program that helps them and little assistance forecast in the immediate future. That must change. Now. It is a familiar refrain, and one with a louder and louder chorus: In addition to the tragedy of Alzheimer’s for those felled by it, there is the overwhelming burden for family members who try to care for those who have this disease and other forms of dementia. More and more families can share the story: A son or daughter, and that son or daughter’s children, try to care for a mother or father stricken with Alzheimer’s and beginning the descent into an inability to care for oneself. There is the feeling, now shared by so many, that it’s better, if at all possible, to try to care for that loved one at home, somehow, even though it means considerable sacrifice. The Institute wants a state strategy for dealing with the disease. The bottom line is that the state has to get more involved in ensuring care. There is but one state-funded program, Project CARE, focused exclusively on dementia. Its budget was cut in 2011, and with that cut the project’s ability to provide respite care for care-givers – family members trying to cope – was virtually eliminated. In addition, there is a Medicaid waiver program that allows more services for families caring for people with Alzheimer’s. That also delays the placement of people in long-term care facilities, all of them expensive. The waiting list for the program runs to 8,000 people and two years. Rather than cutting the Project CARE budget, legislators ought to increase it many fold. A statewide oversight agency should be established to focus on this issue. Legislators also should pass laws specifically aimed at protecting the health and safety of Alzheimer’s victims and assisting those who care for them. For more information on Alzheimer’s Care, contact Spring Arbor. #HowYouLive newsobserver.com
The figures are stunning, but they are true: In less than 10 years, almost 400000 people in North Carolina will have been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia. No wonder that the N.C. Institute of Medicine makes Alzheimer's a top priority. The Institute and advocates ...
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Now that the holidays are long past and spring is on the way, this season of transition has adult children reflecting over time spent with their parents.  Often concerns arise when kids go home to visit.  Here are the top 10 signs that your parents might be ready for a transition into assisted care facilities: * Bills are not being paid on time, overdue or in collections. * Personal hygiene is lacking, there is a strong urine odor, or clothing is being worn multiple times without washing. * Lack of housekeeping. Spoiled food is not thrown away; dishes are undone, untidy in nature. * Poor diet and weight loss. * Losing track of medications: forgetting to take them or taking too large a dose. * Driving is no longer safe: gets lost easily, multiple moving violations, etc. * Lack of interest in hobbies, activities or even leaving the house. * Trouble getting around the house. * Necessary household repairs are not done, mail is not retrieved or opened, and lawn is not taken care of. * Not making sound decisions or observations when doing once routine tasks like turning off the stove, etc. Early detection of a potential problem is key. Keeping an eye out for the 10 warning signs helps ensure no one is taken by surprise, and that the difficult conversation can begin sooner rather than later. Finding an assisted living facility requires a human touch. Every person’s situation is different. Their needs are different. For more information on assisted living residences, contact Spring Arbor. #HowYouLive smmirror.com
Now that the holidays are long past and spring is on the way, this season of transition has adult children reflecting over time spent with their parents. Often concerns arise when kids go home to visit. Here are the top 10 signs that your parents might be ready for a transition into assisted ...
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803 Bermuda Bay Blvd Kill Devil Hills, NC 27948
803 Bermuda Bay BoulevardUSNorth CarolinaKill Devil Hills27948
(252) 558-1243springarborliving.com
Assisted Living Facility, Senior Citizen Center
Assisted Living Facility
Senior Citizen Center
Retirement Home
Today 8AM–12AM
Sunday 8AM–12AMMonday Open 24 hoursTuesday Open 24 hoursWednesday Open 24 hoursThursday Open 24 hoursFriday Open 24 hoursSaturday 12–7:59AM

Spring Arbor of the Outer Banks (Kill Devil Hills) features spacious apartments and a highly dedicated and experienced staff certified in senior assisted living and Alzheimer's & dementia care.

Bright, beautiful and warm with the flavor of the Outer Banks lifestyle. Take a short walk to the senior center, library and Wright Brothers monument, or visit the nearby beach.

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