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Spring Arbor of the Outer Banks
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Below are three evidence-based ways you can protect your aging brain. 1. Be physically active. Taking part in a simple exercise routine each day such as bicycling, walking or even gardening can provide greater blood supply to the brain and help keep you cognitively and physically active. The best evidence we see in terms of maintaining and improving cognitive function is exercise. Exercise fends off many health issues later in life, not just cognitive decline, he adds. 2. Reduce your cardiovascular risk factors. Cardiovascular risk factors, including high blood pressure, diabetes and smoking can damage tiny vessels in your brain, impacting the way it ages. To reduce risks, quit smoking and maintain a healthy weight and blood pressure. If you have high cholesterol, you should follow your doctor’s instructions and follow up with any necessary blood tests. The key is to change any unhealthy habits. 3. Manage your medications. Do you take multiple medications? Older adults are sometimes on more medications than they need to be on.  Many, if not all of them, can potentially affect your cognitive functioning. Check with your doctor to see if your medications have any possible cognitive side effects. For example, sleep medications are known to impact cognitive function, Blazer says. “Asking if you really need to be taking this medication in consultation with a health care professional is an important step to taking care of cognitive health. 4. Maintain a healthy sleep schedule. If you’re already active, healthy and managing your medications, but are still eager to stay sharp, there are a few more actions you can take. For one, maintaining good sleep habits may help. When you have irregular sleep habits and you’re napping during the day or not sleeping well at night, you are not as cognitively sharp when you get up in the morning. There’s a big difference between a 20-minute nap and a two hour nap. 5. Stimulate your brain. Being intellectually engaged is a valuable way to protect your brain. You can do this by simply reading and tackling puzzles or games that require strategy, such as sudoku, chess or checkers. Download a brain stimulation game to your phone or tablet, and keep it up. If you only dabble in these activities or try for a few months and stop, you won't reap any benefits. What we think the evidence shows is keeping intellectually engaged does protect one from cognitive decline and maintains cognitive health. 6. Be sociable. People who are more socially connected to others are better off than those who isolate. Try getting out of the house and spending time around others. You can do this by offering to tutor elementary school students, volunteering or being active in your religious group or community. There's little scientific evidence on how social engagement improves brain function, but adds that we shouldn't underestimate its importance. There is hope. It's important to know that cognitive aging and Alzheimer's disease are two very different issues. In Alzheimer's disease and dementia, there is a clear loss of brain cells. With cognitive aging, the neurons in the brain tend to be maintained – not lost – and can be re-established. That's why we have hope at a more biological level that with the proper stimulation, activities and conditions, we have an opportunity to maintain and improve cognitive function as people age. For more information, contact Spring Arbor. #HowYouLive US News - Health
Below are three evidence-based ways you can protect your aging brain. 1. Be physically active. Taking part in a simple exercise routine each day such as bicycling, walking or even gardening can provide greater blood supply to the brain and help keep you cognitively and physically active.
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If you've ever walked into a room and forgotten why you went there, fret not. That's normal. What's not is forgetting important details from recent life events or repeating the same question several times. Other symptoms and signs of mild cognitive impairment can include problems in other aspects of thinking such as significant difficulties retrieving words, finding routes or planning out complex tasks. There can be emotional and mood-related symptoms including irritability, depression and anxiety. If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with MCI, consider these coping strategies:  1. Make a list and check it more than twice. The Alzheimer’s Association suggests making a list of tasks that may have become more challenging to remember on a daily basis, such as taking medications or other daily activities. Ensure you have your calendar up to date, have reminders set and write it down right away if you’re not an electronic person.  2. Be aggressive ... or not. Some may opt for more aggressive approaches to treatment, such as undergoing additional tests for markers that help determine the likelihood of Alzheimer’s disease as a cause of MCI; early treatment with medications; or participation in clinical studies. Others prefer a less aggressive ‘wait and see’ type approach that would involve checking in with their doctor at a later point. Simply learning as much as you can about MCI and dementia is another less aggressive approach to coping with the diagnosis. 3. Set realistic goals Developing MCI can be frustrating, so it's important to set achievable goals and stick to established plans. The best way of coping is to break things down. Compensate by going around the challenge and not trying to meet it head on. In other words, try not to stress too much about not being able to do things as well as you did before. Instead, only focus on what you can control. 4. Get out there! Many become embarrassed and don't want to interact with others. But staying physically and socially active is an essential coping method. Research has suggested that regular physical activity and social interactions can stave off the risk for Alzheimer's disease, MCI or dementia. More recently, three studies presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in the District of Columbia found that aerobic exercise could influence the development of these conditions. Bicycling, gardening or simply taking a walk after dinner can help protect your aging brain.  5. Asking for help doesn't make you weak. This is a time of transition, and with transition comes the need for support. It's very useful to be able to have input from a partner or someone who is living with the person. Consider individual counseling or support groups offered by the Alzheimer's Association and other groups recommended by the NIH. It's important for family members to understand the symptoms as changes in the brain that cannot simply be willed away or overcome through sheer force of effort. For information on memory care, contact Spring Arbor. #HowYouLive US News - Health
If you've ever walked into a room and forgotten why you went there, fret not. That's normal. What's not is forgetting important details from recent life events or repeating the same question several times. Other symptoms and signs of mild cognitive impairment can include problems in other ...
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Each and every day around 10,000 people turn 65-year-old. They are the Baby Boomers. This generation really brings to light the lack of services available to our seniors. It also shines light on the necessity of planning for our future, and the lifestyle we hope to enjoy. Healthcare costs a lot, so…
Each and every day around 10000 people turn 65-year-old. They are the Baby Boomers. This generation really brings to light the lack of services available to our seniors. It also shines light on the necessity of planning for our future, and the lifestyle we hope to enjoy. Healthcare costs a lot, ...
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Caregiving for someone with Alzheimer’s or dementia is a daunting task, and one in which most caregivers get burned out and break down emotionally and/or become physically ill. The first thing to remember in your resolution to take better care of a loved one with Alzheimer’s is to take care of…
Caregiving for someone with Alzheimer's or dementia is a daunting task, and one in which most caregivers get burned out and break down emotionally and/or become physically ill. The first thing to remember in your resolution to take better care of a loved one with Alzheimer's is to take care of ...
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This week's blog message is very simple. All of us here at Spring Arbor wish you and your family the warmest of Holiday greetings and sincere thanks for your continued trust in us. Your trust and continued partnership with us is nothing short of a blessing and it is truly something we celebrate. We…
This week's blog message is very simple. All of us here at Spring Arbor wish you and your family the warmest of Holiday greetings and sincere thanks for your continued trust in us. Your trust and continued partnership with us is nothing short of a blessing and it is truly something we celebrate.
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How to Start the Conversation About Senior Care If you've noticed the warning signs, the time to start talking with senior parents is sooner rather than later, when a crisis has occurred. But how do you bring up sensitive subjects related to aging, such as the need for assisted living care? Here…
How to Start the Conversation About Senior Care. If you've noticed the warning signs, the time to start talking with senior parents is sooner rather than later, when a crisis has occurred. But how do you bring up sensitive subjects related to aging, such as the need for assisted living care?
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Making a decision to move a loved one into a long-term care facility can be tough enough. Sometimes even more difficult, is finding the right facility. It’s better to do some investigating even if you have to do it quickly,  so you have fewer surprises in the end. Identifying needs Before selecting a long-term facility, you should know about the types of long-term care available and what kind your loved one needs. * Assisted living There are lots of options in assisted-living centers, which are generally less expensive and less restrictive than most nursing homes. Services can vary considerably, but most provide meals, housekeeping, laundry, transportation and social activities. They also often offer assistance with eating, bathing, grooming and personal hygiene. Many provide some nursing care, including help with medication dispensing. * Skilled nursing, including short-term rehabilitation Nursing homes provide 24-hour care with nursing, social services and activities staff, and serve people with more medical services than are usually given with other care options. Yet nursing-home care doesn’t automatically mean a long-term stay; more than half of the people who go to nursing homes stay for three months or less. * Memory care An estimated 5.3 million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s, dementia and memory-care services are often provided in a secure assisted-living or nursing-home setting, usually in a separate floor or wing. Residents might live in semiprivate apartments or private rooms and have structured activities. The goal is to let people live at the highest level of independence that you can. Many family members are inclined to pick a more-restrictive setting than a loved one might need or want in order to keep them safe. Allowing the older adult to have some control in the choice is important because people tend to be happier and do better when they have a stake in the decision. If you need help determining the proper placement, consider a long-term-care consultation. The agency will make home visits to review a person’s needs and circumstances.  Consultants — most often a nurse or social worker — will meet with you and other family members for a free assessment of the current situation and future options. They will explain the available services, eligibility requirements and the financial resources to meet your needs and wishes. Anyone can request a consultation. Getting started Once the type of facility that best suits a loved one is determined, the search begins. Ask doctors, friends and relatives for recommendations. Community social workers, hospital-discharge planners and residents and family members already living in the facilities you’re interested in can also be helpful. The fuller picture you get of a place, the better. Think about whether the center is a comfortable traveling distance from family and friends. And look at the quality indicators compiled by state and federal sources. When examining the quality indicators, pay particular attention to services that matter most to you. A facility that has low satisfaction with patient care and is repeatedly cited for medical errors might be a bad choice for a resident who is confined to a bed and in failing health. On the other hand, a facility with high resident satisfaction that has many activities might be the best fit for a person who is active and sociable. Whatever you do, don’t look at the quality indicators in a vacuum. Don’t make quick decisions based solely on these ratings. They’re important but should be viewed as just one piece of the puzzle. Assessing costs Long-term care can be expensive, and more than two-thirds of people 65 and older will require some long-term care during their lifetime. Assisted living generally runs from $2,500 to $4,000 a month, depending on the size of apartment and level of assistance required, said Peters, who works mostly with elderly clients. Be aware that costs can vary with the residence type, apartment size and services needed. At some places, the basic rate covers all services; others charge extra for special services. Nursing homes, meanwhile, usually cost between $4,000 and $8,000 a month. Alzheimer’s care ranges from about $3,000 to $7,000 a month. Unfortunately, where a person ends up often depends on their ability to pay. People generally have three ways to pay for their long-term needs: personal funds such as a pension, savings or retirement funds; the state Medicaid program, which pays for health care of low-income residents; or long-term-care insurance. A nursing-home stay can quickly deplete a retiree’s financial resources to the level of poverty, at which point they might become eligible for Medicaid. Many people used to buy long-term-care insurance because they were scared of the potential costs, he said. But sales of the policies have declined as insurance companies have raised rates and cut benefits, making more people question their value. Setting priorities Perhaps the single-most important thing you can do, experts say, is visit the centers you’re considering. There’s no substitute for seeing things firsthand. Inspect at least three facilities if possible, and stop by each more than once — so you get a sense of the place during meals, at a shift change and at different times of the day and night. Watch to see whether the staff is friendly, patient and respectful when interacting with residents. Note whether they call residents by name and know the activities each likes or dislikes. Look for warning signs, such a lot of people crowded around the door, trying to get out. Other red flags include loud overhead paging, staff members clustered around the nursing station not paying attention to residents, and patients dressed inappropriately for the weather or left unassisted in front of their meals. Pervasive odors, unclean rooms and unwashed linens might also be signs of an understaffed facility. Use all of your senses as you walk around. As much as possible, you want a place that feels like a home — not a hospital or institution — where your loved one will look forward to each day. It takes your head and your heart to make the right choice. For more information on assisted living facilities, contact Spring Arbor. #HowYouLive dispatch.com
Making a decision to move a loved one into a long-term care facility can be tough enough. Sometimes even more difficult, is finding the right facility. It's better to do some investigating even if you have to do it quickly, so you have fewer surprises in the end. Identifying needs ...
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Do you have elderly parents who want to live in their own home for the rest of their life? You’re not alone. 75% of older adults plan to live out their days in their current home. The reasons for wanting to age in place vary from one individual to the next, but often include strong memories,…
Do you have elderly parents who want to live in their own home for the rest of their life? You're not alone. 75% of older adults plan to live out their days in their current home. The reasons for wanting to age in place vary from one individual to the next, but often include strong memories, ...
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Making the choice that an aging parent is ready for a senior living facility is not easy. Finding the right place to call their new home can be even harder. When going through the process of finding a facility that’s the right fit for a parent or other relative, it’s important to be thorough and…
Making the choice that an aging parent is ready for a senior living facility is not easy. Finding the right place to call their new home can be even harder. When going through the process of finding a facility that's the right fit for a parent or other relative, it's important to be thorough and ...
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The importance of modifying your home so that you can easily get around as you get older — and to make those modifications long before the need arises cannot be stressed enough. This applies to those who plan on living in their current home as long as possible. Another option includes moving to a…
The importance of modifying your home so that you can easily get around as you get older — and to make those modifications long before the need arises cannot be stressed enough. This applies to those who plan on living in their current home as long as possible. Another option includes moving to ...
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Paying for care services is one of the most challenging issues for caregivers because most elders and families must pay for services out-of-pocket. Here are some other options to pay for care: Health insurance Some health maintenance organizations (HMOs) and some health and long-term care insurance…
Paying for care services is one of the most challenging issues for caregivers because most elders and families must pay for services out-of-pocket. Here are some other options to pay for care: Health insurance. Some health maintenance organizations (HMOs) and some health and long-term care ...
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Maybe you've noticed that your parent’s unopened mail is piling up. Or parents who were once meticulous about their appearance, are now wearing wrinkled clothes. When you bring up the subject, you hear, "Everything is fine. There's no need to worry." Admitting they need help would mean they can't…
Maybe you've noticed that your parent's unopened mail is piling up. Or parents who were once meticulous about their appearance, are now wearing wrinkled clothes. When you bring up the subject, you hear, "Everything is fine. There's no need to worry." Admitting they need help would mean they ...
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Contact Information
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803 Bermuda Bay Blvd Kill Devil Hills, NC 27948
803 Bermuda Bay BoulevardUSNorth CarolinaKill Devil Hills27948
(252) 558-1243springarborliving.com
Assisted Living Facility, Senior Citizen Center
Assisted Living Facility
Senior Citizen Center
Retirement Home
Today Open 24 hours
Friday Open 24 hoursSaturday 12–7:59AMSunday 8AM–12AMMonday Open 24 hoursTuesday Open 24 hoursWednesday Open 24 hoursThursday Open 24 hours

Spring Arbor of the Outer Banks (Kill Devil Hills) features spacious apartments and a highly dedicated and experienced staff certified in senior assisted living and Alzheimer's & dementia care.

Bright, beautiful and warm with the flavor of the Outer Banks lifestyle. Take a short walk to the senior center, library and Wright Brothers monument, or visit the nearby beach.

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