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Our December newsletter http://eepurl.com/-vOFf featuring silver jewellery with gemstone inlays by Lisa Tamati and artwork by #Inuit #FirstNations #Maori artists.
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Just added: "Raven Headdress" by Kwakwaka'wakw #FirstNations artist Tom D. Hunt.

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Just added: “Windswept Inuk” by Labrador #Inuit artist Billy Gauthier. “I enjoyed creating this portrait with the fur on his hood ruffled by the wind. It was great carving Italian marble because it holds the detail so well although one has to be quite careful chiseling it. The stone captures the shadows especially when lit from above. The Carrara marble was gifted to me by my cousin John Terriak, who is known Labrador carver. The anhydrite hood was a piece of stone I quarried myself in New Brunswick some ten years ago when I was living there.”

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Just added: "Resting Polar Bear and Cub" alabaster sculpture by #Inuit artist Bill Nasogaluak from Yellowknife, NWT. Bill is primarily a sculptor but also makes drawings and paintings in acrylics. Although he has been drawing and painting since he was a child, Bill became a full-time artist around 1992. Before that time, Bill practiced his art in his spare time as he worked as a trained electronic technician for eighteen years.

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Just added: "Eagle" silver bracelet by Kwakwaka'wakw/Haida #FirstNations artist Dan Wallace. “My traditional chieftain name is Gi-Gamie Kin-Kwus. It was recently given to me, at my young age, because of the passing of my uncle who was the chief. Because my blood comes from two sides — Lek-Kwil-Taich (Kwakwaka’wakw) and Haida — I’ve got the right to work in these two art styles. I feel privileged that I’m allowed to do that and I think my artwork reflects that….”

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Just added: "Thunderbird Spirit" silver bracelet by Haisla #FirstNations artist Barry Wilson. Barry Wilson is from the Killerwhale clan of the Haisla (Xanaksiyala) Nation. Barry was invited with his brother Derek and uncle, Henry Robertson, to travel to Sweden to raise a totem pole that they had carved to replace an existing Haisla pole, circa 1900.

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Just added: "Mother Cleaning Fish" by Puvirnituq, Quebec #Inuit artist Levi Qumaluk.

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Just added: "Mother’s Affection" by #Inuit artist Billy Gauthier. “I had this idea to try and capture the mother gazing with love at her child sleeping in her arms. The bond of a mother’s affection. This sculpture is carved in anhydrite that originated from Michael Massie. Carving this stone was a challenge as it carves good with small chisel tips but is far more difficult when grinding as the surface seems to heat up and get harder! I worked on this a long time trying to get the details in the faces and all the creases and folds in the amouti.”

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Just added: silver jewellery with gemstone inlays by #Maori artist Lisa Tamati http://goo.gl/mCK1iS

“My focus has now developed to specializing in designs influenced by my Māori and Pacific region heritage, my love for nature and the gems its produces while influenced by my European education. I have a large range of opals that feature often in my works and my creations often also showcase Tahitian pearls, paua pearls (natural and cultured), paua shell, pounamu (greenstone) in sterling silver and gold. I like working with other Māori artists and being inspired by new mediums and techniques, my love for our natural surroundings, and my culture and ancestors. I am continually striving to grow as an artist and to honor my roots, my culture and my ancestors. I would describe my designs as being boldly feminine, curvaceous and strong, adventurous at times yet delicate and intricate.”
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Just added: “we seek the same quest” by #Inuit #Metis artist Michael Massie. "The story goes that there were two men who were also the most powerful shamans in their regions. While they did not know each other, their beliefs were the same, in that that they respected each other’s opinions and were of a similar nature about what to do when there were times of starvation. The people would call upon the shamans to contact the Sedna in the hopes that they could convince her to fill their bellies with country food."
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