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Spencer Hunley
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VICTORY!

"In a groundbreaking opinion issued yesterday, the U.S. Department of Labor found that a sheltered workshop in Ohio had violated federal minimum wage laws by underpaying three of its workers with disabilities, including one autistic man.

An outdated exception to federal minimum wage laws, known as Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act, allows certain employers to pay less than minimum wage to people with disabilities if they can show that the disabilities prevent them from being as “productive” as the average nondisabled worker.

Although federal law allows workers with disabilities to file a petition for review of their wages by the U.S. Department of Labor, Felton, Magers, and Steward are among the first workers with disabilities ever to use the petition process to fight for fair wages. This low level of enforcement means that many workshops have paid people below-minimum wages based simply on the assumption that people with disabilities are not as productive as people without disabilities, using flawed productivity measurements as “documentation.”
 
ASAN, Disability Rights Ohio, and National Federation of the Blind Win Landmark Department of Labor Decision Against Sheltered Workshop http://ht.ly/XXTsN
ASAN, Disability Rights Ohio, and National Federation of the Blind Win Landmark Department of Labor Decision Against Sheltered Workshop
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While I'm not a fan of Goodwill (the company that runs sheltered workshops paying those with disabilities a sliver of what constitutes equal pay), this could serve as a template for other areas.

Just wish they had, you know, contacted +Ken Starks​ and maybe tossed some funding at Reglue at the same time. Could've been an excellent and efficient partnership.
The foundation behind Linux is starting a training program for people from disadvantaged backgrounds to get certified in one of the world's most popular OSs
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Charlie Kravetz (charlie-tca)'s profile photoKen Starks's profile photoSpencer Hunley's profile photo
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+Charlie Kravetz +Ken Starks It's just a damn shame; we have the resources, experience, and proven templates for this sort of thing - but instead they turn to Goodwill.
The more I hear about Goodwill and the Linux Foundation, the less this sounds good. A bit unfortunate since I'm pursuing my sysadmin cert through the foundation, but oh well.
I guess it's part of what was feared: takeover of Linux by an oligarchy of corporations.
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Spencer Hunley

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Hi everyone!

First time user of Architect, but used Evo/Lution to install Arch with MATE on an old CR-48 chromebook. Works very well, and allows me to use the CR-48 for notetaking in meetings as well as a small kiosk to run videos or slideshows.
Looking forward to trying Architect on an even older computer, my Asus EeePC 900 - a netbook with close to 1Ghz of processing power from an Intel Atom, less than 50GB of storage, and 2GB of RAM. It ran Crunchbang really well a couple of years ago, but I'm looking to use Arch with i3 window manager to improve performance, memory usage and rely less on the touchpad.

Very grateful for Architect and Evo/Lution! :-)
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+Per-Johan Halsli thanks for the tip; I was able to scan and try to connect to my network, but it failed. Turns out that there's an issue with the wireless card (Intel 4965) and the drivers; a few bugs reported, but not a lot of fixes.
I'm going to keep working on it, but at least I know it's nothing with architect or arch, anyway.
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This is a great move. The Executive Branch funds billions of dollars’ worth of content through various departmental grant programs. Those grants are intended to benefit the public, but too often the public never even sees the results, let alone uses them.

All federal grants are subject to a rule that allows the government itself to share grant-funded works with the public, but that rule has not been sufficient to make sure that sharing happens in practice. As the ED notes, the rule requires the public to be aware of the materials and contact the ED for access, both significant practical and informational hurdles. Open licenses allow publishers and other intermediaries to distribute materials much more widely than either the ED or grantees can alone.

The existing policy also doesn’t cover reuse. Simply being able to access a resource isn’t enough. To unlock its real value, you need to be allowed to modify it, merge it with other resources, and republish it. That’s especially true in education: when educators are empowered to customize materials for their needs and share them with other educators, everyone benefits. Sometimes open access or open education policies authorize specific types of reuse, but those carveouts end up creating doubt and confusion about how people are allowed to use the content.

Open licenses are the right solution.
The U.S. Department of Education (ED) is considering a rule change that would make the educational resources the Department funds a lot more accessible to educators and students—not just in the U.S., but around the world. We hope to see it adopted, and that it sets the standard for similar policies at other government agencies.
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Wow. So this is what the President of the National Education Association thinks of those with disabilities.

It's not funny. It's actually pretty f***ed - in similar fashion to the students with disabilities and medical issues that will be stigmatized, scrutinized, stereotyped, marginalized and treated with an eye roll, all in the scope of this speech given by the president of the largest teacher's union in the U.S.
Of course, the damage here isn't limited to just one speech, as the person crafting and delivering it not only carries such opinions, but also feels delightfully content to state them out loud in front of large audiences. It makes one wonder how this has affected policy, procedure and training in the NEA among millions of teachers.

President Eskelsen's words: “We diversify our curriculum instruction to meet the personal individual needs of all of our students the blind, the hearing impaired, the physically challenged, the gifted and talented, the chronically 'tarded and the medically annoying.”
(See video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zMbspRhqJc&feature=youtu.be&t=100)

This person was given an award the same day those words were spoken.

This year marks both the 40th anniversary of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).
At best, her words mark why both are still relevant. At worst, they symbolize why an update with more stringent regulations is needed: to combat bias surrounding those with disabilities from the top down.

#UnacceptableExample
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How to join an open source project and make your first edits on Git!
Your real-world guide to the Git commands you'll use the most.
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The request comes amid a wider debate on how the #FCC should ensure that Wi-Fi routers’ wireless signals don’t “go outside stated regulatory rules” and cause harmful interference to other devices like cordless phones, radar, and satellite dishes.

#opensource  
Experts are worried about security vulnerabilities hidden behind closed source router firmware.
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This needed to be here ten years ago, but hopefully it will arrive - and not at the figurative cost of an arm and a leg.

No idea what they'll use as their OS base though...
You wouldn't have to read one line at a time, or listen to voices.
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Even $1000 is A LOT anywhere other than US or Europe. Technical accessibility is not enough, and sadly not a lot of people are working on economic accessibility.

Also, this reminds me of a guy who basically built a braille display from a dot-matrix printer. That is something that could be actually accessible to a lot of people.
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What a blatant f**king lie. Since I can remember, Apple has been an attacker of open-source - building walled gardens in its mobile OS, locking down their desktop systems, and generally finding ways to prevent their consumer base from tinkering with the product they sold.

I've never - NEVER - seen apple's accessibility software open-sourced, nor most of its other products. Bogarting the open-source movement is really, really pathetic - and feels strongly of desperation. Desperation for what, I have no idea.
 
No, no, and, one more time with feeling, no. 
But there is something to Apple's ill-thought out claim.
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Wow. So this is what the President of the National Education Association thinks of those with disabilities.

It's not funny. It's actually pretty f***ed - in similar fashion to the students with disabilities and medical issues that will be stigmatized, scrutinized, stereotyped, marginalized and treated with an eye roll, all in the scope of this speech given by the president of the largest teacher's union in the U.S.
Of course, the damage here isn't limited to just one speech, as the person crafting and delivering it not only carries such opinions, but also feels delightfully content to state them out loud in front of large audiences. It makes one wonder how this has affected policy, procedure and training in the NEA among millions of teachers.

President Eskelsen's words: “We diversify our curriculum instruction to meet the personal individual needs of all of our students the blind, the hearing impaired, the physically challenged, the gifted and talented, the chronically 'tarded and the medically annoying.”
(See video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zMbspRhqJc&feature=youtu.be&t=100)

This person was given an award the same day those words were spoken.

This year marks both the 40th anniversary of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).
At best, her words mark why both are still relevant. At worst, they symbolize why an update with more stringent regulations is needed: to combat bias surrounding those with disabilities from the top down.

#UnacceptableExample
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One of the inherent problems with Internet providers is that the largest among them also happen to be cable providers. So as consumers increasingly look to cut the cord, it’s far too easy for a company, like, oh I don’t know, say Comcast, to roll out data caps with overage fees in an effort to restore
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New study shows that contrary to common practice teaching by repetition actually makes learning harder for autistics http://ow.ly/TrJ7l
Monday, October 5, 2015. Training by Repetition Actually Prevents Learning for Those With Autism. By Shilo Rea / 412-268-6094 / shilo@cmu.edu. Repetition and Autism. Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) sometimes acquire a new behavior or skill only in a specific context, ...
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From a Model S owner in Tennessee | Blog | Tesla Motors
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I was driving home from work on the interstate in the right lane at approximately 70 miles per hour, following a truck. In the middle of the