Profile

Cover photo
Spencer Hunley
94,981 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos+1's

Stream

Spencer Hunley

Shared publicly  - 
 
My favorite, locally-owned grocery store is closing. Permanently.

I know this may not seem important - my local newspaper certainly doesn't think so, considering there is no story on their website or in print - but it's a major issue to me.

Their produce always lasted longer than anyone else's, and I could afford stocking up for more than just one month on my meager budget, especially when I was living in a studio apartment working half-time for a college.

But about a year and a half ago, the old mall near the grocery store was torn down to make way for revitalization - new stores, new apartments and even some senior living places. It seemed like things were heading in the right direction.

Then they secured a new 'grocery' store - a damned "neighborhood Wal Mart".

You can guess what happened; people shopped at the new, glitzy, shiny place, the one with low wages, no unions, and products made with slave labor - or pay that's close to it. The original grocery store, the one that's been there for over 65 years, was mostly left behind. Only die hard regulars and few others remained.

And now Wal Mart has taken another local store in its destructive and brutish manner. Sure, the local city officials share the blame. But in the end, Wal Mart remains - and my grocery store is gone.

So now we have less choices, especially within driving distance. And we have yet to begin to suffer this horrible decision and its consequences.
4
Add a comment...

Spencer Hunley

Shared publicly  - 
 
This is extremely important. We've been fighting this battle for nearly ten years, and it's still one that we haven't quite won.
SOPA, PIPA, DRM, DMCA, and now EME and CDMs. We must be loud, vigilant and press ever harder to keep what's left of a truly free internet alive.
If we do not, the internet will become yet another proprietary content delivery system that is unaffordable and unobtainable for many; a computerized version of cable television.
 
We need more Firefoxes.
Once upon a time, there were two major browsers that virtually everyone used: Netscape and Internet Explorer, locked in a death-battle for the future of the Web. They went to enormous lengths to tempt Web publishers to optimize their sites to work best inside their windows, and hoped that users would follow.
11 comments on original post
1
1
Add a comment...

Spencer Hunley

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Linus torvalds is winning a lot these days
1 comment on original post
2
Add a comment...

Spencer Hunley
moderator

Discussion  - 
 
The OpenSTT project is aimed at creating an open source speech-to-text model that can be used by individuals and company to allow for high accuracy, low-latency conversion of speech into text. Currently there are no open source speech-to-text models available, instead this technology is locked ...
View original post
5
1
DeeAnn Little's profile photoCharlie Kravetz (charlie-tca)'s profile photo
4 comments
 
Oh! Read it wrong, then. We do NEED STT.
Add a comment...

Spencer Hunley

Shared publicly  - 
10
1
Joseph Dickson's profile photoSpencer Hunley's profile photo
2 comments
 
+Joseph Dickson​ I missed it too - +Charlie Kravetz​ found this.
Add a comment...

Spencer Hunley
moderator

Discussion  - 
 
This needed to be here ten years ago, but hopefully it will arrive - and not at the figurative cost of an arm and a leg.

No idea what they'll use as their OS base though...
You wouldn't have to read one line at a time, or listen to voices.
3
Stan Stearman's profile photoGaurav Pareek's profile photo
2 comments
 
Even $1000 is A LOT anywhere other than US or Europe. Technical accessibility is not enough, and sadly not a lot of people are working on economic accessibility.

Also, this reminds me of a guy who basically built a braille display from a dot-matrix printer. That is something that could be actually accessible to a lot of people.
Add a comment...
In their circles
230 people

Spencer Hunley

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Holy Hawking! I love my prime minister... 
25 comments on original post
3
Fifty OneFifty's profile photo
 
Why can't we have him as Prime Minister of USA?
Add a comment...

Spencer Hunley
moderator

Discussion  - 
 
Wondering how this will affect future open-source accessibility and AT devices; thoughts?
1
Add a comment...

Spencer Hunley

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
‪#‎RIPRayTomlinson‬ Inventor of Email Service frown emoticon :(
The inventor of Email and selector of @ in email address passed away at the age of 75.
View original post
3
Add a comment...

Spencer Hunley

Shared publicly  - 
 
VICTORY!

"In a groundbreaking opinion issued yesterday, the U.S. Department of Labor found that a sheltered workshop in Ohio had violated federal minimum wage laws by underpaying three of its workers with disabilities, including one autistic man.

An outdated exception to federal minimum wage laws, known as Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act, allows certain employers to pay less than minimum wage to people with disabilities if they can show that the disabilities prevent them from being as “productive” as the average nondisabled worker.

Although federal law allows workers with disabilities to file a petition for review of their wages by the U.S. Department of Labor, Felton, Magers, and Steward are among the first workers with disabilities ever to use the petition process to fight for fair wages. This low level of enforcement means that many workshops have paid people below-minimum wages based simply on the assumption that people with disabilities are not as productive as people without disabilities, using flawed productivity measurements as “documentation.”
 
ASAN, Disability Rights Ohio, and National Federation of the Blind Win Landmark Department of Labor Decision Against Sheltered Workshop http://ht.ly/XXTsN
ASAN, Disability Rights Ohio, and National Federation of the Blind Win Landmark Department of Labor Decision Against Sheltered Workshop
View original post
2
Add a comment...

Spencer Hunley
moderator

Discussion  - 
 
While I'm not a fan of Goodwill (the company that runs sheltered workshops paying those with disabilities a sliver of what constitutes equal pay), this could serve as a template for other areas.

Just wish they had, you know, contacted +Ken Starks​ and maybe tossed some funding at Reglue at the same time. Could've been an excellent and efficient partnership.
The foundation behind Linux is starting a training program for people from disadvantaged backgrounds to get certified in one of the world's most popular OSs
1
Charlie Kravetz (charlie-tca)'s profile photoKen Starks's profile photoSpencer Hunley's profile photo
3 comments
 
+Charlie Kravetz +Ken Starks It's just a damn shame; we have the resources, experience, and proven templates for this sort of thing - but instead they turn to Goodwill.
The more I hear about Goodwill and the Linux Foundation, the less this sounds good. A bit unfortunate since I'm pursuing my sysadmin cert through the foundation, but oh well.
I guess it's part of what was feared: takeover of Linux by an oligarchy of corporations.
Add a comment...
Story
Tagline
A man with many ideas.
Spencer Hunley's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
From a Model S owner in Tennessee | Blog | Tesla Motors
www.teslamotors.com

I was driving home from work on the interstate in the right lane at approximately 70 miles per hour, following a truck. In the middle of the