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Spas Kerimov
“It does not do to dwell on dreams and forget to live.”
“It does not do to dwell on dreams and forget to live.”
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IBCS2017 is coming! It will take place on November 17-19 2017 at Sofia Tech Park, Bulgaria

Inspired by the idea to experience science in its pure form, we devote all our efforts to shedding light on the latest scientific achievements among the medical society by organizing the International Biomedical Congress of Sofia (IBCS) 2017

Here is our first Keynote speaker: Rares Vernica!
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"Small RNA molecules, including microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), offer tremendous potential for new therapeutic agents to inhibit cancer cell growth. However, delivering these small RNAs to solid tumors remains a significant challenge, as the RNAs must target the correct cells and avoid being broken down by enzymes in the body. To date, most work in this area has focused on delivery to the liver, where targeting is relatively straightforward.
 
This week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT now report that they have successfully delivered small RNA therapies in a clinically relevant mouse model of lung cancer to slow and shrink tumor growth. Their research offers promise for personalized RNA combination therapies to improve therapeutic response.

Using the "KP" mouse model, in which a mutant form of the oncogene KRAS is activated and tumor suppressor gene p53 is deleted, researchers injected mice with RNA-carrying nanoparticles. This mouse model recapitulates many of the hallmarks of human lung cancer and is often used in preclinical trials. It was originally developed in the laboratory of Koch Institute Director and David H. Koch Professor of Biology Tyler Jacks, who is co-senior author of this paper.

The nanoparticles are made of a small polymer lipid conjugate, and unlike most liver-targeting nanoparticles, they preferentially target the lung and are well tolerated in the body. They were developed in the laboratories of co-senior author Daniel G. Anderson, Samuel A. Goldblith Professor of Applied Biology, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering and Institute of Medical Engineering and Science; and author Robert Langer, the David H. Koch Institute Professor."
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Harvard scientists have created extremely simple robots, each just a few centimeters across, that collaborate to enact complex behaviors http://hvrd.me/AkHQD

#robots #engineering #science #Harvard
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Revealed: How Ebola paralyses the immune system.

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and elsewhere developed a detailed map of how an Ebola protein, VP24, binds to a host protein that takes signaling molecules in and out of the cell nucleus. Their map revealed that the viral protein takes away the host protein’s ability to carry an important immune signal into the nucleus. This signal helps activate the immune system’s antiviral defenses, and blocking it is believed to contribute significantly to the virus’s deadliness. (http://goo.gl/i0Pz0D)

Normally, the body responds to infections by producing a substance called interferon, which acts as a fast-track message to white blood cells, telling them to mobilize genes and proteins. Amarasinghe's team found that VP24 blocks the channel through which interferon usually travels, crippling the immune system. (http://goo.gl/oYpCJa)

Image credit microbewiki.kenyon.edu
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New exhibition on the super material graphene - the strongest material ever discovered.
Stone age, bronze age, iron age and now the graphene age?
Soon there will be screens that can be bent and ink that conducts electricity. Maybe curtains become unnecessary when the window will go dark with the touch of a button.
Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov shared the 2010 #NobelPrize in Physics "for groundbreaking experiments regarding the two-dimensional material graphene".
For our Swedish followers a new exhibition on graphene opens today, 25 June,@Universeum: http://www.universeum.se/index.php?option=com_content&task=blogcategory&id=1&Itemid=3
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Human Papilloma Virus (HPV),which causes cervical cancer.It was discovered by Harald Zur Hausen(Germany)
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New Tumor Classification Could Change Therapy for Many Patients.

It might be more appropriate to classify tumors on the basis of molecular signatures than on the basis of the tissue in which they originate, researchers from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) suggest. This reclassification of tumors could change the approach to treatment, because molecular signatures are more indicative of the treatment tumors are likely to respond to.

Using their new system, the team reclassified 1 of 10 tumors in "clinically meaningful" ways.  In fact, the 10% reclassification rate might be an underestimation because tumors from all tissues were not represented in the study, and some tissues were underrepresented. It is possible that up to 50% of tumors will be reclassified as more and more get analyzed. The researchers are in the process of expanding their dataset to include 22 different tumor types.

Read more: http://goo.gl/ZIdycl
Study: Multiplatform Analysis of 12 Cancer Types Reveals Molecular Classification within and across Tissues of Origin
Hoadley, Katherine A. et al.
Cell
Image credit babs.unsw.edu.au
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Synthetic Molecule Makes Cancer Self-Destruct.

Researchers have created a molecule that can cause cancer cells to self-destruct by ferrying sodium and chloride ions into the cancer cells. These synthetic ion transporters, described in the journal Nature Chemistry, confirm a two-decades-old hypothesis that could point the way to new anticancer drugs.

Synthetic ion transporters have been created before, but this is the first time researchers have shown them working in a real biological system where transported ions demonstrably cause cells to self-destruct.

http://goo.gl/fbFzcl
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