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Sophie Wrobel
Works at iQser GmbH
Lives in Remchingen, Germany
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Sophie Wrobel

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US starts laying the groundwork for EU Privacy Shield

Privacy Shield is going to replace the Safe Harbor agreement for data transfer between the EU and US - as the Safe Harbor agreement was struck down as invalid by the courts. It should provide more personal protections. The question is, however, whether that is sufficient.

One of the biggest loopholes is that the new US bills cannot 'impede national security interests' - and national security interests has been demonstrated in the past to be very broadly applied, such that the potential for abuse still remains.

We'll have to see how the EU reacts.

#Privacy  #EU #US #PrivacyShield  
The bill gives EU citizens the right to challenge misuse of their data in U.S. courts.
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+Sophie Wrobel I think it's even likely it will be, because it doesn't address the real issue at hand. I doubt even the Commission believe it will be accepted.
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Surgery and the placebo effect

Yes, there are definitely many cases in which surgery is a justifiable and helpful measure. But there are also many cases in which surgery is unnecessary - and given the complications associated with surgical risks, making the call on unnecessary surgery is something that needs to be addressed, regardless of who is at fault.

But first, let's set some misconceptions straight. No, the problem isn't just a big conspiracy in the modern health care system to eek as much money out of patients as possible. There is just as much a problem on the patient side: patients who refuse to provide full medical records that may be necessary to make a sound decision, patients who keep insisting that they have a particular condition and go about from doctor to doctor until they find someone who agrees with their opinion, and patients who believe that by having a treatment, they will be better off than having no treatment.

Appropriate health care requires a stable, two-way trust relationship between doctors and patients: if this trust is broken, then the accusations in both directions take off. Unfortunately, with the overwork and stress commonplace in medical professions, mistakes happen more than they should - and this has resulted in increased mistrust in the health care system, as indicated by the rise in demand for alternative medicine.

Personally, I think we need to strike a balance: if you approach a medical professional and actually care about your long-term health, you should inform yourself about the risks and chances associated with the treatment you are recommended, as well as the circumstances in which that treatment actually helps. If you have a preconception that a particular treatment is going to help, then do your homework and inform yourself about the circumstances under which that treatment actually works, as well as whether your preconception is valid, and keep your tin foil cap on!

Granted, the subject is riddled with biases and any study on how necessary surgery may be is bound to be inaccurate - and despite that, I think that this is an issue that needs to be looked at more closely, and not just surgery, but medicine in general.

/via +Lerato Majikfaerie 

#Health   #Surgery    #Misconceptions   #Geist  
Commonly performed operations can be found to be useless, according to a practising Sydney surgeon.
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Yet you have time to comment on it. Repeatedly.
You don't have to waste time clicking every link... But the ones you're interested in enough to comment on, yeah. 
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Sophie Wrobel

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Adaptive Capacity
How ready is your organization for tomorrow?

I think this is a wonderful short video outlining five critical aspects to ensuring an organization's 'fitness for survival' - namely, it's ability to react to changes in the marketplace and overcome difficulties. The five building blocks are:

(1) Structure
(2) Strategy
(3) Talent
(4) Culture
(5) Purpose

Okay, not too surprising so far. But something has changed: all of that has to cross the digital chasm somehow, and still remain interconnected. Which means we need digital platforms that follow a strategy that can:

(1) Analyze and make connections between these diverse, more-or-less intangible and weakly structured fields
(2) Adapt to constant changes during organizational adaptation
(3) Deliver immediate results throughout the constant adaptation.

What's your approach - and what are your most difficult hurdles in crossing that divide?
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Weaving new patterns of meaningful connectivity - both inside and outside organisations. Then, realigning the two.
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Gaming the legal system to the detriment of public health and safety

TFOA, the stuff in Teflon, is a standard in non-stick cooking pans. But it is only one compound in a whole class of compounds - including TFOA-substitutes - that have not been adequately assessed for public health and safety before being used in manufacturing.

The story of Robert Bilott's case against DuPont concerning TFOA points to just how deeply and intricately manufacturing companies are gaming the system, to be able to continue to produce products. There are several systematic issues:

1) Lack of public awareness, and public misconceptions. I remember the 'Teflon Scare' initiated by the public brief that Bilott published. Shortly thereafter, everyone got told that you could use Teflon, but don't turn the stove to high, use any cooking utensils in the pan, or put it in the dishwasher. Or consider the vague statements on the presence of TFOA in a water bill. This sort of information, while practical, does not provide any explanation of the risks or the basis on which the tips are derived - and without that information, leaves an eerie gap in public awareness of health consequences. There is not just an awareness gap in what chemicals do, but also in what chemicals are present where. There are lots of chemicals in processed foods that do not need to be listed, and therefore aren't listed. In plastics and other synthetics, there is even less regulation - do you have any idea what is in your clothing? Your cooking tools? Your crafts glue bottle? Probably not. And if you do know, then you already know how difficult it is to get a hold of information, and how difficult it is to put it all together.

2) Lack of consumer-safety oriented regulation. What happens when TFOA one day becomes banned? Manufacturers just move on to the next compound in the family - and there are so many of them, and so many more being created every year, that the slow pace of year-long litigation won't be able to keep up with it. And the consequences of each product are wide-reaching and devastating: not just entire communities with poisoned water supplies, but also the entire world - how did Atlantic salmon suddenly show up in the picture? Consumer products should be regulated such that only compounds that are provably safe for consumer health are allowed in the materials list. Today, pretty much any compound that isn't on the exclusion list can be used in consumer products. We need to turn this around - any compound that isn't on the inclusion list shouldn't be used in consumer products, with rigorous health and safety regulations before new compounds are included.

3) Lack of liability. Who picks up the bill at the end of the day? And how do you reverse contamination that spreads around the world? TFOA isn't the only compound that has crossed oceans in its fallout - in a more recent example, Fukushima radiation outfall are quite visible in western US agriculture. And with thousands of unregulated compounds and thousands of aging provisionary waste containment facilities that become permanent (in many cases despite being designed to be temporary and lacking appropriate maintenance and long-term safety mechanisms in the design) due to lack of appropriate disposal alternatives, we have a lot of baggage to deal with, with no preventative solution and no solution to ensure appropriate clean up when its too late. Compensation for today's victims - if they survive long enough to get compensation - simply doesn't clean up the mess for tomorrow's citizens. It's time to push up the stakes for taking responsibility, and if it means that companies go bankrupt doing so, then so be it - companies that care enough to stay around in the future will be smart enough to adapt their practices to match changing regulatory conditions.

#Health #Environment #Geist

/via +Jürgen Hubert
Rob Bilott was a corporate defense attorney for eight years. Then he took on an environmental suit that would upend his entire career — and expose a brazen, decades-long history of chemical pollution.
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+Sophie Wrobel apparently link to cancer is not enough

Well.. again - you have to draw the line somewhere.  Ban it if it causes cancer in lab rats at 3,000 times the expected exposure level for humans?  What about slow-acting carcinogens that take 20 years to manifest?  (Consider skin cancer caused by UV in sunlight - that sunburn you got when you were 7 can come back to haunt you a half-century later...)

For bonus points - what do you do with reports that cooked red meats cause cancer?  What happens when you try to remove beef from the marketplace?
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2016: expanding horizons

You may have noticed that I haven't been around here too much lately. There's been a lot going on behind the scenes planning and setting up for this year, and will be a lot more going on this year.

But, a new year is time for reflection and planning ahead, and it is quite a challenging year planned ahead - one requiring growth in all horizons.

Family: last year, our family size increased. And as kids grow, so does the size of their problems... Or however that old piece of wisdom went. Each of the three kids has new projects for the new year (some force-selected and some self-selected), and keeping them motivated while pushing them to explore their weaknesses as well as their strengths is a continual challenge. One of their projects which is publically available: www.ameliewrobel.de

Educational: I will be finishing a certification in health, as well as starting a master's degree in IT law. This has been an idea that I have been toying with for several years now - formalizing my interest and activities in the field - and I'm finally getting around to turning that to reality. Perhaps also a good excuse to analyse events that transgress in 2016!

Work: I have some quite sporty growth goals for this year. I hope the markets keep pace and are ready! At least, if Gartner is right and effective big data management is a hot topic - in particular how to fast track legacy data and legacy documents into an integrated, dynamic enterprise ecosystem - then 2016 should be an exciting year.

Farm: my partner has just bought a strip of farmland - one of his long-standing dreams. So this year, as new farmers, we'll expect to spend quite a bit of time tending the orchards, and over time adding a vineyard and adding honeybees. The next two months won't be too busy on the orchards, but after that there will be work to be done.

Dialogue: sometimes I wonder whether you realize how important you are to me. Like every human, I have need of entertaining, intriguing, intellectual dialogue - and amidst all the bustle of daily life, this is one of my most cherished dialogue outlets, and I look forward to continuing to converse here throughout the year.

And the question at the end of the day - will it all fit into that 24 hour per day limit that we all have? I'm sure it will - everything is a question of priorities.

#resolutions #2016 #PersonalGoals #life #Geist 
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+Ha Wai​ thanks for the offer! I used to have a vineyard, but that was an existing one - a new start is going to bring some new challenges, particularly in the first years and because the new strains are more fussy than the old ones. Any advice on getting through the first few years?
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Intellectual property vs. the information ecosystem

Oh, no - this is particularly troubling. I can understand that content owners and creators want to profit from their work. But the proposed solution of telling search engines to pay out profits to content creators, is a doubly bad idea. An initiative that needs to be stopped, and replaced with a more intelligent and more modern one. The internet information ecosystem isn't perfect, and does need change, but destroying it completely won't make things better.

First, it will either destroy the search engine business, or cause search engines to stop listing major publishers (causing them to cry out or at least allow relisting of their works without cost). Search engine optimization is a key marketing tool, and should be incorporated into business plans that way.

Second, it does not address the complexities that digital content creation involves: how do you deal with remixes, derivative works, and so on?

I think that what we need is an overhaul of the information ecosystem to reflect content ownership, change history, and fairly distribute profits as part of the business strategy of all parties involved, throwing current copyright ownership into the inspection mechanism and replacing it with a more up-to-date version reflecting critical issues sich as: Who is the content owner? For what purpose has the content owner shared their content? How are derivative works, and derivative contributors, fairly compensated and attributed? What exactly is being sold, and how does the service offered and user demand relate to what the contributor has contributed? 

/via +Eileen O'Duffy 
The European Commission is preparing a frontal attack on the hyperlink, the basic building block of the Internet as we know it. This is based on an absurd idea that just won't die: Making search engines and news portals pay media companies for promoting their freely accessible articles.
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+Chris Harpner in my experience, there are good law professors over 50 who 'see the vision' and would make very valuable contributors. I'd welcome their input anytime, because with their experience, they can highlight, and help solve, challenges that techies may miss. But they aren't too many, and they don't get paid as well as the contributors backed by 'dinosaur corporations'.
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What's the EU up to these days?

Unlike what the headline suggests, the game isn't over yet, and there is more legislation to come. The EC is running a series of workshops this month to gather information from industry on how data is being transmitted and the legal constructs currently associated with that, and I'd expect that the conclusion of these workshops will be at least an opinion and recommendation, if not new legislation, that is going to shape the European cloud provider market. 

#Privacy   #Cloud   #DataProtection   #Europe  
With the European Commission's data protection rules set to drop before 2016, take a look at what the changes mean for the cloud and datacentre community
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Generation C's demand for privacy: Social media is evolving

The meaning of privacy is evolving - it seems that the younger generation does value privacy, but not in the same sense that the older generations have.

Privacy, for younger people, is reflected in their demand for technological media that limit the access to information they are sharing to their social circle. Older, digitally-sensitive folk also make conscious decisions to restrict which information is shared to whom. Yet these positions differs in one key area - the amount of trust offered to the technological platform operator. Younger generations tend to assume that underlying platform operator is an honest player: a potential fallacy that older generations take the opposite stance on.

The change in trust between the two generations on that particular factor is a pivotal change in the digital ecosystem. This trust is essential for deriving data-based benefits out of operating such a communications platform. It is what causes intelligence agencies and marketing departments to flock to platform providers, and the core to understanding and providing personalized services. And with the rising generation more willing to offer up that trust than their parents, it looks like market pressures of supply and demand - with this change in trust driving the supply and demand for social media providers offering the sort of walled gardens that Generation C is looking for - is going to fundamentally change the landscape of social media as we know it.

http://www.businessinsider.de/young-people-flock-away-from-social-media-2016-2?r=UK&IR=T
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Just invest in p2p tech instead.
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Success is not your goal. Avoiding failure is.

This is a wonderful reflection on why success is such a fleeting state, and takes a very simple - yet very approachable and effective - method to attaining success. The following excerpt sums it up:

He always said, “I just try to avoid being unsuccessful.” That is the number one thing I learned from him. He said that you should study what makes you unsuccessful, unhappy, broke, fat, stupid. Then, eliminate those things out of your life.

The alluring part of this approach, compared to many others, is that most people know what they don't want already, but don't know what they really want. And knowing what you don't want is all that you need to start on this pathway - steer away from what you don't want to be, and towards what you want to be. If your closest friends are pulling you down, perhaps it's time to find some friends who will pull you up - and with that, not just your attitude towards life will change, but so will your success.

#Geist #Charisma #Happiness
Do you really think you’ll be successful if you simply copy other people’s habits? If that was the case, success was eas…
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+sophie wrobel
well dear,no body or nation strife to be poorer than than the other but you find that the opposite is true with wealth...
The love for money is the root cause of evil...Wealthy nations & individuals always wants to be considered wealthiest.The reason as to why they are not at peace always is that they dream of being better than the other only which is not the case with the poor and also there's team work among poor nations trying to help themselves out of their situation & any sign of success would make them happy.For wealthy countries & people,they tend to build their own strategies that would make them better than the others no matter the consequences.They always plan for the downfall of their neighbors...
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Cell targeting

Cancer is certainly a dreaded condition. And this approach - targeting cancer cells with intelligent nanobots that recognize protein signatures and release the right drug in response - could certainly help provide a more beneficial treatment alternative. But what does the payload actually contain, and how accurate is the targeting mechanism? Creating an auto immune condition certainly wouldn't be nice.

Or more importantly, how certain are we that the bots are safe, robust enough to avoid self destruction and remaining non manipulated during therapy, and exiting the body after therapy?

/via +IdeaFaktory​
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Then it is the question, if the fast evolution of machine can really be countered by the slow evolution of medicine.
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Effective personalized learning, but without personal information

Coming from Facebook, I'm quite skeptical on Zuckerberg's particular take on personalized learning. It looks like an attempt to monetize the immense data reserves held by Facebook with very little investment on learning outcomes.

But at the same time, I think it is worthwhile to highlight the effectiveness of personalized learning as a tool that has been repeatedly demonstrated to give children a deeper understanding for and appreciation of the topics to be learned. Yet these effective experiment conditions involve an integrated, involved personalized learning experience - a far more integrated and far more involved experience than I suspect Zuckerberg is thinking of.

Rather, I am referring to a system which teaches children how to find what they want to learn about, and encourages them to discuss, explore, and intrigue each other into learning more. Because finding and analyzing information is a much more valuable skill than regurgitation these days. And even more important is understanding and applying acquired information - which is what these newer learning environments encourage through appropriate technology integration and modified pedagogic form.

To better understand what effective personalized learning should mean, I highly recommend you take a look at these TED speeches - they're a few years old, but still equally relevant (yes, that's goes to show how slow our education system is at embracing change!):
- Sugata Mitra (2010): http://www.ted.com/talks/sugata_mitra_the_child_driven_education
- Sir Ken Robinson (2010):
https://www.ted.com/talks/sir_ken_robinson_bring_on_the_revolution
- Sir Ken Robinson (2013):
https://www.ted.com/talks/ken_robinson_how_to_escape_education_s_death_valley

Personalized learning without personal information
If you look closely, this latter sort of personalized learning doesn't actually require personal information to create personalized learning. Instead, it requires students to create and define a learning context - and build interest groups around that context in order to conduct learning. What makes this learning personal is the fact that each student has a unique combination of learning contexts, depending on their interests - meaning that each student has their own expert specializations, while still learning enough about all contexts to attain a broad general education base. Or to make things simpler to understand: why not recoin the term 'personalized learning' as 'contextual individual learning', to avoid confusion on whether personal information and associated data privacy issues come into play?

That's where Zuckerberg misses the point: yes, we need personalized learning. But we don't need a service that collect personal information in order to deliver personalized learning. What we need is a service that delivers contextualized information to provide personalized learning.

#Education #Privacy #PersonalizedLearning

/via +Sabine Eckhardt Legakulie
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+Eileen O'Duffy well, language changes. I doubt that back in the 80s 'personalized' was a bad thing - we didn't have the context of widespread global data abuse that big data and social media have made possible.

One thing that I've noticed is that large enterprises looking to offer new online services are starting to shift away from 'personalized', because they realize that consumers don't want to build individual profiles all over the place (and hand over their data). Rather, consumers want a relevant online offer experience without the profile-building stuff. In my opinion, that applies to shopping just as much as education: put relevant, interesting materials together to create a unique individual experience - yes. Build a profile around each individual where they have to fork over data - no.
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From DRM to Smart Contracts to CopyFair

As nice as a digital commons might be, I think that digital commons platforms today lack in one particular aspect embodied quite closely by 'CopyFair'.

In the race for data ownership and data monetization, large corporations have built significant businesses around collecting data and works from users, and capitalizing on their productions - but not sharing the associated profits. The result is a transfer of capital from consumers to intermediaries (online platforms), leaving the creators and data owners out of the loop.

CopyFair is one attempt at reworking the profit sharing agreement, paying out royalties to data owners / creators for commercial use of their works and information. While it is not perfect, it represents a major step forward to building a viable, long-term digital economic system that ensures continued capital flow as opposed to capital concentration.

#Economics   #Policy   #OpenSource   #DigitalCommons   #CopyFair   #Copyright  

/via +Hoda Maalouf 
By David Bollier, author, blogger and consultant. From open access platforms to managed digital commons: that is one of the chief challenges that network-based peer production must meet if we are going to unleash the enormous value that distributed, autonomous production can create.
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There are several countries developing a blockchain voting system right now.  There are also some apps coming out, like http://bitcongress.org/

Most of those concerns you have are only a problem because of the monopolistic corporations that have central control over everything, +Sophie Wrobel.  Their model, based on industrial age mentality, will not last in the new era anyway, they are just bridges. (not that they think that)
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People
Have her in circles
22,910 people
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Work
Employment
  • iQser GmbH
    Strategy and Business Development, 2014 - present
  • Independent consultant
    Information Consultant, 2014 - present
  • CAS Software AG
    Software Architect, 2011 - 2014
  • IBM
    Application Development Expert, 2006 - 2011
Basic Information
Gender
Female
Other names
webmage
Story
Tagline
Everything is possible in the virtual world, it's only a question of innovation.
Introduction

Advocate for technological innovation, digital literacy, and online privacy.

Things that I am passionate about:
  • Technology - Trends, Innovation, Mobile development, Performance, Usability 
  • Online Ethics - Censorship, End-user rights, Data ownership and protection. 
  • Human Awareness - Power of the mind, Relationship to the world and other beings, Quest for Harmony
  • Food - I like to eat food, but don't expect me to post about it often!
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Remchingen, Germany
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