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Sonny Williamson
Works at Self Employed
Attended Anglo-European School, Ingatestone
Lives in Clacton-on-Sea
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Sonny Williamson

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High-School Internet. I love it when +Cracked does these "internet party" videos and they knocked this one out of the park. All in one shot too! 
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Wow! I hardly contained myself. Had colleagues looking at me quizzically. This is so shared. 
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The other day I made a post about being an #EverydayFeminist  and here we have a brilliant video about #EverydayRacism . It's a different angle on a different topic, but the elements of the problem remain the same: in our current Western culture, certain demographics are systematically discriminated against in ways that you would not even realise or recognise unless you were either a member of that demographic or were paying attention and caring about it.  

I know, it's become a "thing" to hear about prejudice, discrimination and a multitude of "~isms" in popular discourse and I know that if you're not a victim of that, it's easy to dismiss, ridicule and become annoyed by those that complain about it. I know that when life becomes difficult, as it does for every living thing on earth, it can be tiresome to hear some people claim "special treatment" when they air their grievances. After all, do we all not suffer? Is life not a struggle for everyone? Why should you get all the attention?  

The thing is that yes, life is tough for everyone, which is why we must strive to make it a better place for everyone, no matter what your race, colour, creed, gender, physical or mental ability, or favourite ice cream flavour is. It's perfectly possible to see the larger picture of how people of all stripes suffer at the hands of fate or an uncaring system whilst at the same time recognising that certain minorities face barriers and indignities that are logically, philosophically and in all ways unjustified but are unfairly inflated because of historical and cultural biases. 

As I said in my post about feminism, it's easy for a Western, middle-class, white, straight, abled man to disregard the problems of other people simply because I'm a human too and I've got as many problems as anyone else, just by virtue of being a human in this world. Why should anyone else get singled out? But of course it's not special treatment, it's that those other groups get an even worse deal that is entirely and completely based on pure, unadulterated bullshit. 

I don't have to be a part of those groups to understand or feel what they're going through, I have enough friends and loved ones of every conceivable human flavour that I can understand their woes on an empathic level as a fellow human being (this is an advantage of living in a cosmopolitan city like London).  Even if I didn't, I'm salient enough to be able to read and hear from the experiences of others online and in art that it is a reality they face in their daily lives.

Just honestly coming to terms with the sorts of endemic bullshit they have to face on a daily basis that's built in to the way that the society they live in works around them on top of the crap we all gave to put up with every day is enough to make me mad and I'm not even directly affected by it. 

So I'm not afraid of the "anti-SJW" backlash that's de rigueur (in all honesty I'm not entirely even sure what Tumblr even is) and I'm not afraid to speak out for the cause of basic human dignity and equal rights. Fuck racism. Fuck sexism. Fuck cynicism. Fuck everythingism. And fuck me if you have the inclination, I'm easy. 
Racism is a business. Its marketing is so successful that even Akala looks sideways at a young black man holding a lot of cash. These racial assumptions lead to 'everyday' racism - daily encounters and micro-agressions. It's time to recognise the relationship between top-down propaganda and the bias that we all carry
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Being human means having empathy for others. Unfortunately a large swath of what claims to be humanity refuses to expand their understanding. I have no sympathy for willful ignorance, which is obviously different from ignorance itself, and feel that by ignoring the issue they are only giving it more power. I truly do understand some people don't have exposure to it. Jack grew up in Buffalo, NY. It's not at all diverse. It took him a bit to wrap his head around the things he saw as well. It's being willing to do that and refusing to perpetuate it that which makes someone a good person.

+Sonny Williamson​​​ That self absorbed harpy woman was a soul sucking difficult person. One hour with her would help you understand how incredibly horrible extreme narcissism can be for others.
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Not quite the view I had from cloudy England, but it'll do.
View of the #solareclipse  from the #ISS , with the milky way thrown in for scale.

#Eclipse   #Eclipse2015   #internationalspacestation   #Space  
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Photoshopped!
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I never really shared people's enthusiasm for St.Patrick's Day. I think I last celebrated it when I was at university 15 years ago. I even have Irish grandparents and come from proper Irish stock, but I still consider myself English as that's where I and my parents were born and have lived all our lives, so I don't feel any special need to go green in March. Seeing people around the world with the most tenuous links to the Emerald Isle proudly proclaim their "heritage" leaves me baffled.  

I also don't need an excuse to drink to excess; I'm British. It's more of a persistent hobby. That said, follow the link to clear up a particular niggle that grates anyone who knows. 
Each and every year millions of Irish, Irish-ish and amateur alcoholics are needlessly distracted from their Holy Tradition of drinking themselves into a stupor in honour of Saint Patrick and the wee island he adopted as home. They spit-take their libations—a shameful waste; they wring their ...
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and British is awesome.I wish I were one:)
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Sonny Williamson

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Reshared at 9:26 (EST). 
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annnnnd this must be stupid.
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Sonny Williamson

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What exactly is "life"? Well, it's complicated…
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To welcome in the first day of #spring2015 , here is a wonderful performance of my pick of the most important piece of music written in the 20th Century, The Rite of Spring by Igor Stravinsky. 

Monumental, earth-shattering, riot-inducing, world-changing Art of the highest order, it simply must be experienced. For further details, see my post from 2013 commemorating the 100th anniversary of its infamous premier: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+SonnyWilliamson/posts/XYLKcmQ7M28

Hold on to your hats and enjoy! 
 
Stravinsky's Rite of Spring

In this 2013 BBC Proms performance, Les Siècles Orchestra perform Stravinsky's Rite of Spring (“Le sacre du printemps”), with  François-Xavier Roth at the podium. The orchestra, from France, was formed in the summer of 2003 by François-Xavier Roth.

As its website says:

With a vast period-instrument collection at its disposal, spanning the baroque, classical, romantic and modern eras, the orchestra’s repertoire is notably wide in range. Les Siècles is one of a small number of ensembles to employ period and modern instruments, playing each repertoire on appropriate instruments. Its flexible and historically informed work delivers a unique strand of creative programming.

The piece premiered at Paris’s Théâtre des Champs-Élysées on May 29, 1913; it caused quite a lot of controversy, Wikipedia notes:

It was written for the 1913 Paris season of Sergei Diaghilev's Ballets Russes company; the original choreography was by Vaslav Nijinsky, with stage designs and costumes by Nicholas Roerich. When first performed, at the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées on 29 May 1913, the avant-garde nature of the music and choreography caused a sensation and a near-riot in the audience. Although designed as a work for the stage, with specific passages accompanying characters and action, the music achieved equal if not greater recognition as a concert piece, and is widely considered to be one of the most influential musical works of the 20th century.

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Spring officially begins in the northern hemisphere with the March or vernal equinox at 22;45 UTC, or here in Toronto at 18:45, or 6:45 p.m. EDT. An enjoyable,, meaningful and green spring to one and all.

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More at http://perryjgreenbaum.blogspot.ca/2015/03/stravinskys-rite-of-spring.html

#Spring2015 #Stravinsky #RitesofSpring  
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The Fantasia version, while historic, is a bit old fashioned these days. Nothing like a high-quality modern orchestral recording to really hear it. 

In fact, like all music - but especially "difficult" 20th Century music - listening to it live is always the way to experience it properly. I think the first time this piece truly came alive for me was when I snuck into the hall during rehearsals at the Royal College of Music and heard them practice snippets of it here and there. Getting to feel each section out of context as well as having the physical acoustic instruments move the molecules in the air totally transformed the piece from an intellectual chore to a visceral delight. 

I've seen it countless times live since (I've even conducted parts of it while at university, which was a challenge I can tell you!) and it never fails to grip me and knock me sideways. Look out for it if it's playing in any concert halls you can get to, it's an incredible experience. 
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Sonny Williamson

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I love Roald Dahl's books.  Read them as a child, re-read them as an adult and found them even more special.  His books speak to every age.
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Once more, for fun, because it still blows my mind.

#PiDay   #piday2015
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^_^ x
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Happy Tau Day.

#PiDay   #piday2015   #TauDay  
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Sonny Williamson

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Another day, another lovely, creative, inspiring granddad is taken from us. This time it's the Australian pot-headed pixie, gnomic wizard and founder of Gong and the Soft Machine, Daevid Allen.

Gong's psychedelic, progressive and extremely silly music was something of a soundtrack to my years at university. I'll never forget seeing them play in a small pub venue, with Daevid jigging on the stage like a jolly, octogenarian  pipe cleaner with a kung-fu master beard. RIP, you crazy, wonderful person. 

http://www.theguardian.com/music/musicblog/2015/mar/13/daevid-allen-gong-soft-machine-remembered
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I'm going music hunting now!  I had never heard of him.
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Work
Occupation
Composer, Chortler, Professional Enthusiast.
Skills
Audio Wizard. Classical Pianist. Sesquipedalian badass.
Employment
  • Self Employed
    Composer, present
  • Avid
    Product Specialist, present
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Clacton-on-Sea
Previously
London
Story
Tagline
"Information can't kill you" - Frank Zappa
Introduction
I'm a self-employed composer, musician, sound designer, recordist and general audio wizard. I mainly write music for TV and radio commercials but I'm also a product specialist for Avid Technology, demoing, teaching and explaining Pro Tools and Sibelius software to people. I am also the classical music blogmaster for TicketMasterUK. 

An Olympic-grade enthusiast, my particular areas of inspiration include classical music, science (especially physics), comics, coffee and critical thinking. Also zombies.
Bragging rights
I am occasionally dragged from drunken hangouts at the behest of the BBC for my prowess in science evangelism. I also once discombobulated Stephen Fry. Both of these things are true.
Education
  • Anglo-European School, Ingatestone
    1990 - 1997
  • University of Southampton
    Music, 1998 - 2001
Basic Information
Gender
Male
I arrived late to a party of 18 but was seated quickly and, though I ordered as their food was served, I had eaten my own meal in time for desert to be served at the same time. This, even though I ordered the rack of lamb, which is hardly a quick dish to prepare, which fell off the bone and was delicious. Very accomodating, great food and good atmosphere.
Food: ExcellentDecor: Very GoodService: Excellent
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
High ceilings, wide walls and soviet paintings dominate this spacious but busy venue. Some nice drinks and a good menu helped make both my visits pleasant. Staff were friendly, though sometimes a little swamped. Overall a recommended destination.
Food: Very GoodDecor: ExcellentService: Very Good
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
All in all, you can't go wrong with a night out at Bloomsbury Bowling. A great venue for birthdays and other such events, you get a nice variety of bowling, drinking, karaoke and a fifties diner, all bound up with a great atmosphere. Bear in mind that it's a popular place, so it's nearly always busy. But raucous fun times are nearly always had. Perfect for a 7-15 person group looking for a good night out. Don't forget to order your White Russians!
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
I live in Temple Fortune and Piacere is always my first choice when eating out locally. Ideal for a quick lunch, it has a nicely varied menu with consistent quality of food (I'm fond of the eggs benedict) and the friendly staff always serve you promptly, even when it's busy (which is every lunch time really, always bustling). Recommended if you're looking for a quick quality bite to eat when in the area.
Food: Very GoodDecor: Very GoodService: Excellent
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
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Simply one of the Great London pubs. Located in a delightfully cosy corner of Hampstead, it feels like walking into an Inn from Hobbiton, with nooks and crannies filled with people quaffing ales and eating the delicious food. Always busy, it's worth spending time having a drink or as a destination for a fine evening meal. I take nearly every visitor to the city there if I can.
Atmosphere: ExcellentDecor: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
The music venue at King's Place is a favourite of mine, particularly for chamber music. It has excellent acoustics and is laid out well. On top of this, they always program very interesting, varied content and showcase extended festivals, like the year-long Bach Unwrapped taking place during 2013. Easy to access (it's a stone's throw from King's Cross Station), it also features an Art gallery and some places to eat, including the quite tasty (but quite expensive) Rotunda. All in all, a great cultural destination and worth checking out the program for upcoming concerts and events.
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Top quality food, wonderful service, nice atmosphere. My dining guest and I had the set menu, which was well priced and had a great selection in each of the three courses. My starter of lamb was simply delicious and the beef bourguignon melted at the touch. Delicious dining, very friendly staff and overall a wonderful experience. Looking forward to returning for a repeat performance.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago