Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Solo World Traveler
4 followers -
Discover North, Central and South America with me in 2016
Discover North, Central and South America with me in 2016

4 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
Full Post: http://bit.ly/2hHRh7H Time to go home to Miami Beach. After nearly six months of traveling across and down and around the Americas, it was time to head home to Miami Beach, Florida on my KTM 1290 Super Adventure.

The journey would be in two parts. My bike would travel first via Cargo, which I detailed the process with Dakar Motos from Buenos Aires in my previous post.

I would then travel on my lonesome to Miami Beach by Aerolineas Argentina. The flight is a pain, but not so much if you are tired and you just need to sleep.

I was now looking forward to getting home and seeing my friends and loved ones.

It was almost surreal finishing this trip. You are happy you have finished it, but you really wish you could just keep going. However, all good things must come to an end.

The Process is fairly straightforward to pick up your bike (if it is registered in the USA). I first had to go to a place near the airport to finish paperwork for importation into the USA.

There was no one working reception, so I had to wait about 20 minutes. Once I was finally served, it took around 5 minutes to get all paperwork in order.

Then I had to go to Tri-Star Airport Handling Services Company to pick up my7 Motorbike.

Here I had to pay $60 USD cash (or Credit Card) to get my motorbike. I waited around 15 minutes for them to process all papers, then was directed into loading bay area to wait for my bike.

The bike came as it left, loaded on a crate and was in perfect condition. Getting it all setup again took around one hour. Best to bring any tools you would need for this. The process included:

Unwrapping Bike
Remove Straps
Connecting Battery
Putting back Side Mirrors
Putting back Windshield
Then I was good to go. I had not been in Miami for quite some time, but I knew I hated riding the i95, so it added around 30 minutes to the trip back.

And then I was home. The end!
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Full Post: http://bit.ly/2hl0IKh Time to ship my motorbike Buenos Aires, Argentina. We took our bikes early in the morning to the Ezeiza International Airport where our bikes would be shipped from.

We also met (location map) a few days ago with the people at Dakar Motos, who would be shipping our bikes, mine to Miami and Eric's to Capetown South Africa.

The process for this is quite easy but you must follow the three major steps carefully. Firstly you need to make contact with Dakar Motos months in advance and give them estimates of when you will be requiring their services.

The Process with Dakar Motos

Contact Dakar Motos about a month in advance and let them know approximate dates. Phone: 54-11-4730-0586  Email: dakarmotos@hotmail.com
Then contact them about a week before your arrival with more precise dates. They will send you a detailed email explaining the process.
You will then meet with them with a deposit (I paid $100 USD) and get all paperwork in order. Detailed below!
You will then need to go the following day into the city at a specific location and pay the balance (again cash), my balance was around $1700 USD.
From there you will get all the paperwork you need and Dakar Motos will send you a further email with where you drop the bike off and remaining information.

Dakar Motos Notes
Dakar Motos only manage air freight to and from Buenos Aires to almost anywhere in the world (prices vary)
Give them at least a two-week notice/confirmation
The price of air freight for my bike (KTM 1290 Super Adventure) to Miami was around $1,800 USD.
The price included booking, shipping organization, packaging, customs clearance, air freight and the entire local charges in Buenos Aires, it’s a whole package. No extra charges or fees, no surprises.
The procedures in Buenos Aires took around 3 workdays (not Saturdays, Sundays or National Holidays that Cargo doesn’t operate). You must be staying in Buenos Aires, to be assured everything goes smoothly.

Dakar Motos - Shipping your Motorbike from Buenos Aires
Day One: Meet at Dakar Motos, pay the deposit ($100 USD) and supply all paperwork. A second day for packing the bike that you must take to the airport, paperwork and customs formalities there (from the morning and can take until afternoon), a third if you will pay cash for final payment at downtown (part of the morning), could be good if you can stay for a fourth extra day for any imponderable that could appear. For all of this owners have to be present.

You Need to Bring to Day One:
For this first meeting you will have to bring:
Argentinean Temporal import permit: original and 2 paper copies.
Passport original and 2 paper copies of each: Details pages and last Argentinean entry stamp.
Bike Registration or Title: original and 2 paper copies
$100 USD cash or the equivalent in Argentinean Pesos on that day for the Booking (included in the quote)
Day Two: You will need to pay cash for final payment at a downtown location (took one hour), For this, the owner of the bike (you) must do this in person.

Day Three: For packing the bike that you must take to the airport, paperwork and customs formalities are taken care of there (this took around 4 hours total) For all of these days the owners (you) have to be present.

For all of this, the owners (you) have to be present. So you cannot get someone to do it for you!

What you can pack on your Motorbike for Transport
You can send only luggage relative to the bike and you as the rider, like all your riding gear, tools or your compressible spare-parts. You cannot carry any other personal belongs, camping equipment, liquids or sprays, flammable. I was able to have all cases, tank bag, riding gear (pants jackets, boots, socks etc) also all my tools etc.

You could take a chance like I should have, on batteries, they do scan the bike. But once it's packed, you're good! They will only tell you to remove it, so take a chance I say!

The bike will fly on the next available plane with space for normal cargo, some products such as perishable goods will have priority before our bikes.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Full Post: http://bit.ly/2wfTmKt After settling in with a few beers on my first night in Buenos Aires, Argentina. I met up with Eric Bernath a few days later, a fellow solo traveler who started his journey in May 2016 and has been traveling the world.

Eric is a nice guy who with his Vstrom has traveled North America, Central America, Mexico, South America, Africa and is now in Europe. He is still going too and will be in Australia sometime shortly! Follow Eric on Instagram

We just rode around with no real goals. We also did a little shopping, had a bite to eat and just toured the city.

Dakar Motos - Shipping your Motorbike from Buenos Aires
We also met with the people at Dakar Motos, who would be shipping our bikes, mine to Miami and Eric's to Capetown South Africa.

I will write more about this in the next blog post, including a detailed description of what you need to do to ship your motorbike to anywhere in the world from Buenos Aires.

Shipping Motorbike from Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires would also be the city where I had to arrange to ship my motorbike from Buenos AAiresto Miami, Florida, which I will address in detail in the following post.

Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires is Argentina’s big, cosmopolitan capital city. Its center is the Plaza de Mayo, lined with stately 19th-century buildings including Casa Rosada, the iconic, the balconied presidential palace. Other major attractions include Teatro Colón, a grand 1908 opera house with nearly 2,500 seats, and the modern MALBA museum, displaying Latin American art. From Wikipedia
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Full Post: http://bit.ly/2vmT0p7 Well, here we are, my last major riding day into Buenos Aires, Argentina. After over 20,000 miles, 170 days and nights touring through America, Central, and South America I get on my trusted steed tarni, my KTM 1290 Super Adventure.

After spending two relaxing nights in Bahia Blanca, I was itching to get to Buenos Aires.

The highways were mostly pretty good. I took Ruta 3, then Ruta 225 for this 8-hour journey trekking through towns such as Coronel Pringles, Sierras Bayas, Azul, Saladillo, Lobos, Monte Grande on my way to Buenos Aires.

Fuel availability/quality was still an issue, but my pump was no longer throwing up alerts.  I always get premium gas where I can, it is more expensive, but for modern bikes, you nearly always need hi-octane fuel.

I took lunch along the way in Saladillo and rested for about an hour. I was staying in Palermo District in Buenos Aires.

Palermo is a neighborhood, or what they call a barrio of Buenos Aires. It is located in the northeast of the city, bordering the barrios of Belgrano to the north, Almagro and Recoleta to the south, Villa Crespo, and Colegiales to the west and the Río de la Plata river to the east. It is quite a leafy area with lots of parks, cafes, and restaurants.

Once I arrived, I parked right outside a pub and took in a liter of beer over about an hour before a short 200-metre ride to my AirBNB Apartment.

Shipping Motorbike from Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires would also be the city where I had to arrange to ship my motorbike from Buenos AAiresto Miami, Florida, which I will address in detail in a following post.

Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires is Argentina’s big, cosmopolitan capital city. Its center is the Plaza de Mayo, lined with stately 19th-century buildings including Casa Rosada, the iconic, the balconied presidential palace. Other major attractions include Teatro Colón, a grand 1908 opera house with nearly 2,500 seats, and the modern MALBA museum, displaying Latin American art. From Wikipedia
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Full Post: http://bit.ly/2vY5d0n Bahia Blanca, Argentina was over 700 miles away, so I had to leave Comodoro Rivadavia at first light and have a solid day of riding.

The highways were mostly pretty good. I took Ruta 3, then Ruta 251 and finished on Ruta 22.

Again fuel would be an issue, but not only getting gas, but also the quality. I always get premium gas where I can, it is more expensive, but for modern bikes, you nearly always need hi-octane fuel.

After getting a full tank at Río Negro, Argentina, my bike almost immediately started sputtering, after about 10 miles it would hardly go above 25 miles an hour and could not accelerate. I was also getting fuel pump warnings.

I called my mechanic back in Miami and went through ball possibilities; we were 90% sure it was fuel related. My choices were simple. Either get some small hi-octane fillers and hope that works or completely bleed the tank and refill.

There was no first option available, so I headed back to Río Negro and found another gas station and parked my bike out the back and began dismantling my bike and bleeding the tank.

After about an hour I was ready to fill it again. This set me back big time. But I had no other options.

After refilling tank two times the bike was performing nearly at 100%. However, I was still having issues from time to time with the fuel pump. I ended up arriving at Bahia Blanca after dark.

Bahia Blanca
Bahia Blanca is a port city in the southwest of Argentina’s Buenos Aires province. Grand 19th- and early-20th-century buildings like the Palacio Municipal line its central square, Plaza Rivadavia. Museum highlights include the Museo y Archivo Histórico and the Museo del Puerto de Ingeniero White, both documenting the lives of immigrants. The city is known as a gateway to Patagonia, farther south. From Wikipedia
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Full Post: http://bit.ly/2uMOa2Y Although Comodoro Rivadavia, Argentina was nearly a 500-mile journey, I was hoping to accomplish this in under 10 hours. Again I packed my gear the night before and headed out of Rio Gallegos at sunrise.

It was still bitterly cold, but I knew the more miles north I headed, the warmer it would become.

I had also heard that there were some oil strikes on and getting gas was going to be an issue, so I pinpointed some towns to fill my bike and got trekking.

I would travel along Ruta 3 the whole way passing through Le Marchand, Comandante Luis Piedrabuena, Río Chico, Puerto San Julián, Fitz Roy, Cañadón Seco, Caleta Olivia and then finally into Comodoro Rivadavia, Argentina.

The first gas station was empty and was not expecting to refuel until the following day, so I tried to reach Comandante Luis Piedrabuena. I stopped about 90 miles short as I was nearly out of gas and used my spare one-gallon tank.

Unfortunately, that one extra gallon only got me within 2 miles of Comandante Luis Piedrabuena.

Luckily highway patrol stopped by after only a few minutes of running out of gas, helped me hide the bike down the embankment and drove me the 2 miles to the gas station. I fill my spare one-gallon tank and returned to my bike and then returned again to the gas station.

All up it only took me about 45 minutes longer than expected, so I was lucky! Gas would be a thorn in my side from now until Buenos Aires.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Full Post: http://bit.ly/2wdekcZ So finally I head back the 2000 miles to Buenos Aires through Rio Gallegos, Argentina for the night. I had a fantastic time in Ushuaia and spent a few days exploring the Parque Nacional Tierra del Fuego.

The border crossing was only a hundred miles away, so I was hoping there would be no lines and I could get on my way into Chile without too much fuss.

I would then need to take a ferry and then cross another border back into Argentina for the last time.

Although the trip total was 370 miles (595 kilometers), it is partly paved with the majority of off-roading near the borders. I started Ruta 3, then onto Ruta 257 and then back onto Ruta 3, and the whole trip took me just over 9 hours, which is pretty good considering I crossed two borders.

Full Post and Border Crossing Ferry Information: http://bit.ly/2wdekcZ
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Full Post: http://bit.ly/2u6z3hm Tierra del Fuego Park, Argentina and the end of Ruta 3. Yes, this was a very short ride, but it is one that everyone who goes this distance feels compelled to do.

And so, I got up early bells rode into the Tierra del Fuego National Park (Parque Nacional Tierra del Fuego)

The ride is mostly a dirt track, and if you are a tourist, you have to pay about USD $20 with a bike. Pretty much a rip-off. If you are camping, you can pay extra fees, sign and document, and camp there, which would have been nice!

It is a nice park, but not amazing. If you have done the trip by car or bike, then you need to go. If not, you might consider giving it a miss.

Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego Province, Argentina
Ushuaia is a resort town in Argentina. It's located on the Tierra del Fuego archipelago, the southernmost tip of South America, nicknamed the “End of the World.” The windswept town, perched on a steep hill, is surrounded by the Martial Mountains and the Beagle Channel. It's the gateway to Antarctica cruises and tours to nearby Isla Yécapasela, known as “Penguin Island” for its penguin colonies. From Wikipedia

Tierra del Fuego National Park
Tierra del Fuego National Park (Spanish: Parque Nacional Tierra del Fuego) is a national park on the Argentine part of the island of Tierra del Fuego, within Tierra del Fuego Province in the ecoregion of Patagonia Forest and Altos Andes, a part of the subantarctic forest. Established on 15 October 1960 under the Law 15.554 and expanded in 1966, it was the first shoreline national park to be established in Argentina.

Tierra del Fuego Province, Argentina
Tierra del Fuego is an Argentine province. The province had been inhabited by indigenous people for more than 12,000 years since they migrated south of the mainland. It was first discovered by a European in 1520 when spotted by Ferdinand Magellan. From Wikipedia

Cabañas Ushuaia
Cabañas Ushuaia Nice apartments (although dated furnishings) with deck and nice views of Ushuaia. The lady who operated these was nice; they also run a lovely little pastry shop downstairs. My only issue was WiFi which was pretty poor. All in all a great stay and something nice to come home to each evening!
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Full Post: http://bit.ly/2u4xWhO Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina. Yes, this was the goal for me over five months ago. Explaining the feeling, you get when you reach a goal, no matter how hard is difficult to explain.

Riding into Ushuaia, for some reason, I got a little emotional. No shouting out yeeha or anything like that. All that happened was that I visually traveled through my mind all the great times and tough times, like walking all my luggage through sand, coming off the bike (twice) and other experiences.

It is not that the journey is that demanding, anyone who had a bike, a little money, patience and a little bit of grit can do it, the fact that only a small percentage make it for a variety of reasons just makes it all the more satisfying.

The day started pretty badly in Rio Grande, as the hotel I was staying at was trying to hold me hostage over a broken lamp, a lamp I might add that was broken when I arrived in my room. And it was broken, just the head of the lamp was detached. That cost me 30 minutes.

I left Rio Grande in the early morning for the 120-mile journey to Ushuaia. The ride was quite nice, and the weather was getting better, although still overcast.

Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego Province, Argentina
Ushuaia is a resort town in Argentina. It's located on the Tierra del Fuego archipelago, the southernmost tip of South America, nicknamed the “End of the World.” The windswept town, perched on a steep hill, is surrounded by the Martial Mountains and the Beagle Channel. It's the gateway to Antarctica cruises and tours to nearby Isla Yécapasela, known as “Penguin Island” for its penguin colonies. From Wikipedia

Tierra del Fuego Province, Argentina
Tierra del Fuego is an Argentine province. The province had been inhabited by indigenous people for more than 12,000 years since they migrated south of the mainland. It was first discovered by a European in 1520 when spotted by Ferdinand Magellan. From Wikipedia

Cabañas Ushuaia
Cabañas Ushuaia Nice apartments (although dated furnishings) with deck and nice views of Ushuaia. The lady who operated these was nice; they also run a lovely little pastry shop downstairs. My only issue was WiFi which was pretty poor. All in all a great stay and something nice to come home to each evening!
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Full Post: http://bit.ly/2vc7Pee A one night stay in Punta Arenas, Chile and onto Rio Grande, Argentina on my way to Ushuaia. The rain had not let up; I was hoping so much I could get a few nice days in Ushuaia. After a few rain soaked days in El Calafate, Argentina and then rain again all day in Punta Arenas I made my way to Rio Grande, Argentina, and yet another border crossing. I would start on Ruta 9 then onto Ruta 255, then cross over into Argentina on Ruta 257 and finish on Ruta 3.

The border crossing was not far from my starting point, so I was hoping again that there would be small lines and I could get on my way back into Argentina without much fuss.

Although the trip total was 260 miles (424 kilometers), it is paved for some of the way and the dirt, rough roads for about half the journey.

The Ferry - Cruce Punta Delgada
Cruce Punta Delgada Simple crossing by Ferry. I had to wait around 30 minutes before the ferry was loading, the trip takes about another 20--30 minutes depending on the weather and traffic.

Was a nice trip. I stopped at a nice little cafe beforehand and had some lunch. Pricing varies depending on the mode of transport.

The cost was only around $6 USD. Information here.

Tourism Card
I purchased online a Tourism Card (USD $100) for Argentina from here. I got mine for 90 Days. You MUST do this before you enter or travel to Argentina. It is not available at point of entry for Argentina.

Full Post and Border Crossing: http://bit.ly/2vc7Pee
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded