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Solomon Walker
Works at Museum of Digital Fine Arts
Attended Business and Art Schools
Lives in Toronto, Canada
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Solomon Walker

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On a hot summer morning months later, Dee, 42, is trying her best to be heard over the banging of construction workers who are readying the new gallery for its late-September debut. “By the time I left Chelsea it had become 57th Street,” she says, referring to the Manhattan retail haven. In Harlem, “you still have mom-and-pop stores. There’s the familiarity of a village. The economic and social diversity is radical in relationship to Chelsea.”

Contemporary art gallery Gavin Brown’s Enterprise moved from the West Village to 127th Street earlier this year, and the Studio Museum in Harlem, which, coincidentally, had its first home in Dee’s new space, is planning a major expansion with noted architect David Adjaye. Many artists, including Julie Mehretu and Ugo Rondinone and his partner, John Giorno (whom Dee represents), have already migrated north. Dee is confident other galleries will follow, whether big operations in search of satellite spaces or smaller ones like her own that are getting priced out of downtown.
Is Harlem New York City’s Next Art Enclave?
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Solomon Walker

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ProFusion is a photo and video event in that caters to the professional image-maker. Showcasing over 130 Industry Leading Brands
ProFusion Pro Photography and Video Expo in Toronto | Get Free Tickets to the show - October 5-6, 2016
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Solomon Walker

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Nuit Blanche Toronto begins at 6:58 p.m. this Saturday, October 1, with nearly 90 independent projects by Toronto’s art community and four city-curated exhibitions featuring 48 other projects, all by some 300 local, national and international artists.

It’s impossible to see everything—and also impossible to know, given the event’s ephemerality, what art will have the most impact. Here are seven projects our editorial team will be sure to see.
The 11th annual dusk-till-dawn event hits Toronto this Saturday. Here, our editors’ best bets.
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Solomon Walker

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If the idea of museums radically altering their collection displays semiregularly is now not only uncontroversial but commonplace, it’s worth remembering that this is a relatively new state of affairs. Art historian Douglas Crimp’s influential 1980 essay, “On the Museum’s Ruins,” opens with a pointed analysis of an angry review by Hilton Kramer that lambasted a recent reinstallation of the Metropolitan Museum’s 19th-century-painting galleries. For Kramer, some works were self-evidently masterpieces, representing Western civilization’s greatest cultural achievements, while others were plainly second-rate curiosities, and the notion that both categories were worthy of equal consideration within the exhibition space bore witness to a pernicious “postmodern” hostility to critical judgment and connoisseurship. More recently, in 2004, Guardian critic Jonathan Jones expressed a similar sentiment in response to the presentation, back in 2000, of the collection at the newly opened Tate Modern, as well as the “MoMA 2000” exhibition cycle from that same year, which was the first significant reinstallation of the museum’s collection in decades. Both these shows abandoned chronological or movement-based narratives in favor of transhistorical, thematically oriented clusters. “It seemed so irrational to consign a great work to storage because it didn’t fit a reinstallation,” Jones wrote. “The occasional insight was poor compensation for the disappearance of [the museum’s] masterpieces.” These statements are tinged with a reactionary conservatism: acknowledging that art’s history can’t be fully collapsed into a series of major isms or that the category of “masterpiece” is historically exclusive need not automatically involve abandoning the idea that some artworks are more worthy of display than others.
Curatorial staff and art handlers at the Whitney Museum, installing the 2015 exhibition “America is Hard to See.” NIC LEHOUX, 2015/COURTESY WHITNEY
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Where is that financial power coming from then, you ask? The answer is from a marked increase in the number of high net-worth individuals in Asia. According to economist was Clare McAndrew, the results of the artnet and China Association of Auctioneers (CAA) annual report are telling: “The Asia Pacific region is hugely important for the art market, and now it’s the biggest center of high net worth wealth in the world.” Notably, this is the principal reason artnet News has selected the region as this year’s area of Focus for it’s 2016 list of artnet Titans.
The 100 names on this list make one thing clear: They are each major players in an increasingly integrated if far-flung art world.
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Power in our rapidly expanding global art world comes in many forms. There’s creativity which pushes past formal boundaries, influence which can often convince cultural agents to do its bidding, and wealth which, while greasing the wheels of artistic enterprise, is also capable of changing all the iron rules into rubber bands—to quote novelist Ryszard Kapuscinski.

Today, financial power—as expressed in ever-rising multimillion dollar, pound sterling and renminbi sums—remains very much the dominant force in the art world. As Phillips CEO Edward Dolman told Bloomberg in January, the growth of the art world continues apace, even amid a global economic downturn. He and other auction experts have consequently characterized the recent decline in auction sales not as a “correction” but, more optimistically, as a “consolidation.”

Where is that financial power coming from then, you ask? The answer is from a marked increase in the number of high net-worth individuals in Asia. According to economist was Clare McAndrew, the results of the artnet and China Association of Auctioneers (CAA) annual report are telling: “The Asia Pacific region is hugely important for the art market, and now it’s the biggest center of high net worth wealth in the world.” Notably, this is the principal reason artnet News has selected the region as this year’s area of Focus for it’s 2016 list of artnet Titans.
The 100 names on this list make one thing clear: They are each major players in an increasingly integrated if far-flung art world.
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Solomon Walker

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The Economist looks at what seems like growing momentum around a group of African-American artists who were once celebrated Modernists but got dropped from the narrative.

Framed around Sam Gilliam’s resurgent visibility among collectors, in museums and on the art market, the Economist story suggests the trend involves more than one artist:

A younger generation of black American artists—Kerry James Marshall, Glenn Ligon, Kehinde Wiley, Kara Walker, Theaster Gates and Njideka Akunyili Crosby—have found international success. Next year Mark Bradford, a social-abstractionist based in Los Angeles, will represent America at the Venice Biennale. Christopher Bedford, director of the Baltimore Museum of Art, calls Mr Bradford “one of the most significant painters of his generation”.
The Economist looks at what seems like growing momentum around a group of African-American artists who were once celebrated Modernists but got dropped from the narrative. Framed around Sam Gilliam&…
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“Mysteries of the ‘Gallery Girl,'” is a weekly series exploring the role of the “gallerina” in the contemporary art world.

Since its inception in the mid-2000s, the term “gallerina” has become popular fodder for contemporary media and culture. The New York Times reported on the fad in its early age, running a story titled “Gatekeepers to the Art World” in 2008, while more recently, New York Magazine art critic Jerry Saltz published an essay in defense of these women. The Bravo channel too jumped on board, debuting the reality show Gallery Girls in 2012. Even the HBO series Girls featured one of its central characters in the job.

But, for all of the word’s popularity, its meaning—and what the gallery assistant job actually entails—remains mysterious. Morphing over the years from a casual nickname to a perceived insult, “gallerina” is now used to conjure the mostly negative image of attractive, stone-faced young women who worship at the altar of contemporary art, serving as assistants to the art world titans they aspire to be, and scoffing at anybody else.
“Mysteries of the 'Gallery Girl'’” is a weekly series exploring the role of the “gallerina” in the contemporary art world.
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Solomon Walker

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“I’d rather take a loss,” said Kantor, who is offering the Scott-Douglas work at the Phillips auction in New York on Sept. 20.
“I feel like it can go to zero. It’s like a stock that crashed.”

Prices for works by young artists such as Scott-Douglas and Lucien Smith soared with the auction market in 2014, sometimes reaching hundreds of thousands of dollars, when they were traded like bull-market tech stocks. But since auction sales began to drop in late 2015, the emerging names have been hit especially hard. Sales by some artists are down 90 percent or more as the glut of work and nosebleed prices scare away buyers.

That’s because speculators purchase art to resell it, not to keep it.
Art dealer and collector Niels Kantor paid $100,000 two years ago for an abstract canvas by Hugh Scott-Douglas with the idea of quickly reselling it for a tidy profit. Instead, he is returning the 28-year-old artist’s work to the market this week at an 80 percent discount.
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Solomon Walker

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The notion that collectors sit atop the hierarchy of today’s art world is axiomatic. They build private museums and control the boards of traditional ones. Through their acquisitions, they determine the fates of artists, and often overshadow curators, historians, and critics—all those ink-stained intellectuals who used to play a larger role in determining art’s value.

And yet, one must not discount the supplier. On the primary market—the placement of new work straight from artists’ studios—art dealers often shape collectors’ tastes. On both the primary and secondary, or resale, markets, they shepherd artworks onto collectors’ walls (or, as the case may be, into their freeport storage spaces in Geneva or Singapore). In a recent profile of David Zwirner in the New Yorker, Nick Paumgarten wrote that “one prominent collector referred to Zwirner as his top ‘go-get guy.’ To go and get, you have to know who owns what, how he or his heirs feel about it, how desperately they may need money.” Certain dealers are now celebrities. “Call Larry Gagosian, you belong in museums,” rapped Jay-Z, an art collector himself, and one of Gagosian’s high-profile clients.

But even as the world’s most powerful art dealers become household names, there is a pervasive sense that some of them have lost their aesthetic compass, if they ever had one, that they’ve abandoned the idea of taking an aesthetic position in favor of global domination. Today’s so-called mega-galleries have outposts in all the world’s major cities (16 shops and, quite possibly, counting, in Gagosian’s case); by necessity, they have taken on dozens of artists, being perhaps more concerned about having available product than a coherent program. “Now, they’re department stores,” as critic Dave Hickey put it ten years ago, when the mega-gallery phenomenon was ramping up. “Stables of artists once embodied the taste of the gallerist. Now everybody has one of each: your Iranian minimalist photographer, your elegant object maker, your Berlin pornographer.”
From left, Virginia Dwan with Hedy Lamarr and Larry Rivers at Rivers’s 1961 exhibition at Dwan Gallery, Los Angeles. COLLECTION OF VIRGINIA DWAN/COURTESY THE
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Solomon Walker

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Today, financial power—as expressed in ever-rising multimillion dollar, pound sterling and renminbi sums—remains very much the dominant force in the art world. As Phillips CEO Edward Dolman told Bloomberg in January, the growth of the art world continues apace, even amid a global economic downturn. He and other auction experts have consequently characterized the recent decline in auction sales not as a “correction” but, more optimistically, as a “consolidation.”
The 100 names on this list make one thing clear: They are each major players in an increasingly integrated if far-flung art world.
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Solomon Walker

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These hour-long gallery visits are held throughout the day at different locations (talks will be approximately 30 minutes long, and start about 10 minutes into the hour). Talks are grouped by neighbourhood and are drop-in, so you can make your own itinerary.

Get up close and personal with Toronto’s art scene and learn directly from art experts in the city. The day will conclude with a launch party at Division Gallery for Canadian Art’s Fall 2016 issue.
Meet up with our editors and contributors September 24 at various Toronto galleries for free talks about art. End the day with a fall issue launch.
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Solomon's Collections
Communities
17 communities
Work
Occupation
CEO, Museum of Digital Fine Arts (MoDFA)
Skills
drawing, painting, photography, illustration, sculpture, computers, photoshop, graphics art, business, management, writing, editing, social media
Employment
  • Museum of Digital Fine Arts
    CEO, present
    The Founder and Principle of the Museum of Digital Fine Arts, which spotlight and showcases established and emerging artists and photographers along with their incredible work in monthly exhibitions. Solomon's duties encompass management, curating, marketing, writing, social media, talent search, and much more.
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Toronto, Canada
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Artist, Entrepreneur, Photographer, Poet
Introduction
Solomon Walker is a Professional Artist and Photographer who has been drawing and painting since the age of 11. He creates “fine art” from emotions and philosophy. His work is influenced and inspired by various aspects of life, of living, and a whole host of worldly issues. His formal artistic education took him through technical schools, workshops and personal tutorship. His specialized training includes Anatomy, Sculpture, Portraiture, Graphics Design and Print Making, Illustration, Computer Graphics, Painting, Drawing, Typography, Fashion design, Photography and Video-graphy. His artistic influences include Realism, Abstract Expressionism, Cubism, Conceptual, Dadaism, plus other modernist art movements. In creating his unique pieces, Solomon likes to work in a blend of abstracts and conceptual forms, arriving at a final look that is truly his own.

Solomon has been awarded for his work in both fine art and photography and, his work can be found displayed on various online art and photo galleries.


Education
  • Business and Art Schools
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Solomon Walker's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Lumen Prize Winners' Gala Tickets, Thu, 29 Sep 2016 at 17:30 | Eventbrite
www.eventbrite.co.uk

Join us for an evening of cutting-edge artist films and installations from around the world. The winners' of this years Lumen Prize will be

World's tallest and longest glass bridge opens in China
www.dezeen.com

A 430-metre-long glass bridge has been constructed across a deep canyon in China's Zhangjiajie National Forest Park, designed by architect H

Sigma sd Quattro: Hands-On First Look | SIGMA Blog
blog.sigmaphoto.com

Sigma sd Quattro: Hands-On First Look of the first mirrorless interchangeable lens camera to feature a Foveon X3 Direct Image sensor.

Why you should drop 2 months’ rent on a piece of art
finance.yahoo.com

Last year, I bought my then-boyfriend a $1,800 limited edition photographic print of Mendocino, Calif. by Canadian photographer Michael Levi

Could the new tinder for art collectors make you a millionaire?
www.independent.co.uk

Swipe left to reject. Swipe right and pray for a match. Repeat until your grubby needs are satisfied. This is the formula for a match on Tin

Fotopath Process
www.fotopath.com

FotoPath's proprietary photo printing process provides the best characteristics of inkjet (giclee) printing and digital-c photograph printin

Someone Finally Designed An Easier Way To Hang Art
www.fastcodesign.com

A little to the leftno, a little to the right. There's got to be a better way.

Art Basel Begins, As The World’s Primo Dealers Fight A Cooling Market | ...
www.artnews.com

Jean-Michel Basquiat, Year of the Boar, 1983.COURTESY ARTNEWS With market prognosticators fearing a tepid start to Art Basel amid an interna

Absolut Art Award Creates Offshoot Prize For Emerging Artists, Names Jur...
www.artnews.com

Daniel Birnbaum, who will head up this year's jury.©MODERNA MUSEET/ÅSA LUNDÉN Absolut announced today that it has created a new award for em

CDiscover Webydo
discover2.webydo.com

Webydo is a professional website design platform that empowers graphic and web designers to craft pixel-perfect responsive websites for thei

Nazis, Con Men, Forgers, And Thieves: Art Crime In Postwar Cinema | ARTnews
www.artnews.com

Film still of Sterling Hayden in Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing, 1956. COURTESY THE CRITERION COLLECTION On August 21, 1961, Francisco Goya’s

Nice Museum. Where’s the Art? - The New Yorker
www.newyorker.com

Museum leaders today would be condemned were they not punctilious about creating spaces where all are ostentatiously welcomed, encouraged to

May Auctions In New York Totaled $1.2 Billion, About Half Of November Ha...
www.artnews.com

Christie's New York headquarters at Rockefeller Plaza.COURTESY CHRISTIE’S The May sales of Impressionist, modern, and contemporary art in Ne

Chéri Samba, 'I am the man who eats paint,' 2005.
www.wsj.com

Chéri Samba, 'I am the man who eats paint,' 2005.

Theft! Forgery! Murder!: Art History’s Greatest Crimes | ARTnews
www.artnews.com

Bank Robber Aiming at Security Camera, Cleveland, Ohio, March 8, 1975, on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art's exhibition "Crime Stories

What does it mean to "buy" digital art? - The Space
www.thespace.org

How do you buy or sell a piece of digital art? Sam Sedgman explores notions of ownership in a digital age.

‘Absolutely Gross, Degenerate Stuff’: Trump And The Arts | ARTnews
www.artnews.com

Andy Warhol, Trump Tower, 1981.COURTESY ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS, INC. In the spring of 1994, an artist named Paul Rebhan

Artexpo New York 2016
artexponewyork.com

April 14-17, 2016 — Pier 94, new art by 1000s of contemporary artists, painters, sculptors, illustrators

always a family hot-spot for many generations, Ontario Place provides folks from all-walks-of-life the opportunity to get out and enjoy the blissful sun-drenched days of summer at the edge of the lake in beautiful city of Toronto...with live concerts in the open-air, boat rides, picnics, water rides, food and entertainment of all variety, it's a place you can escape to and never want to ever leave!
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
just a stone throw from ritzy Yorkville, the Design Exchange a great place to visit and take in amazing design inspirations from designers of all specialization right in the heart of beautiful Toronto, Canada.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
amazing place, especially for children, but, adults will definitely enjoy it too. and although it's not in the rush of the city, it's only a short ride from the exciting entertainment venues at Yonge/Eglington. A great place year-round!
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
with old world elegance and charm, this beautiful theatre center is a fabulous spot in the heart of the beautiful city of Toronto, Canada.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
8 reviews
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a wonderful place for curious and creative folks, situated right in the heart of the city, and just across the street from the ROM (near Avenue Rd. & Bloor St.).
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
a mainstay in the heart of the bustling city of Toronto, AGO is a fabulous was place to spent time viewing art masterpieces and other cultural treasures from the past and the present too.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
just a really awesome spot in the beautiful cosmopolitan city of Toronto. For year-round fun, it's hard to think of spending your urban moments any place else than at the lovely Harbourfront Centre and surround area.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago