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Solomon Walker
Works at Museum of Digital Fine Arts
Attended Business and Art Schools
Lives in Toronto, Canada
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Call for Submission.

Art & Beyond Cover and Content Competition fro My/June Magazine.

Deadline April 17, 2016

To apply go to http://www.artandbeyondpublications.com/cover-competition/
Art & Beyond Online Magazine is holding Cover and Content Competitions for each Online Magazine issue. Four winners will be chosen: Front Cover, Inside Front Cover, Back Cover and Inside Back Cover. Winners will be awarded with One Full Page article published in the Art & Beyond Online Magazine.
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Create Websites Faster, Much Faster
Webydo is a professional website design platform that empowers graphic and web designers to craft pixel-perfect responsive websites for their clients, code-free.
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Why did you choose to start your collection with Yves Klein's painting IKB 108?

I had not planned for that. It was supposed to be another one. Called Red No. 1. I had planned for the Sam Francis. So this one come up before that. And all of a sudden, it was like a beautiful girl swimming out from the ocean. Very beautiful. It touched my heart. I said, "Let's bid."

My assistant said, "We had not planned for that. We have not done any research for that." I said, “I like it. Let's do it."

Are you already thinking about what you might want to collect next?

I think for Yves Kleins, if I could buy IKB 1. I know it's like $10 million but it's my target. [Aside: I was curious and did some research in the artnet Price Database. The work Zeng was referring to, IKB 1 (1960), was sold in 2008 at Sotheby's New York for $17.4 million. (It was estimated to sell for $5 million – $7 million.)] Because this artist, he has a philosophy. In Chinese philosophy, you have to be empty to get something. If you have a teapot, and you leave old water in overnight, you'll never drink fresh water. Empty it first. Then you drink fresh tea. In our industry one of our heroes is Steve Jobs. He would always go to India to try to get some tips from Zen philosophy. Once he learned more about empty, he developed an ecosystem, IOS…. When you become empty and let other people share with you then you become developers of the ecosystem. So it's very important to become empty to absorb new ideas. This is a philosophy in our industry. From this piece of art, I do see a lot of things like this. I see the blue, the empty…. It's Simple. Simple is beautiful.
After making a splash with a $3 million purchase of an Yves Klein blue canvas, first-time collector Edward Zeng opened up in a car ride to the next auction.
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With a gun in her holster and her mind in art history, FBI Special Agent Meridith Savona has been investigating art crimes for the FBI’s New York office major-crimes unit since 2010. She has seen her fair share of fraudsters and thieves, ranging from would-be dealers trying to pawn off fake Jackson Pollocks to rapacious collectors willing to pay top price for stolen artifacts. With all that she has discovered, her view of the art world, characterized by its secretive nature, is considerably less than favorable—simply put, a breeding ground for crime. But, Savona thinks it’s changing for the better, due in no small part, she believes, to the FBI’s efforts.

Savona is one of two agents based in New York specially trained in the investigation of art crimes, a multimillion-dollar industry rivaling organized crime and arms trafficking. If someone calls the FBI reporting the robbery of a painting or a fraud being committed by a would-be dealer in New York, the case would most likely wind up on her desk or on that of her colleague Christopher McKeogh. The two are members of the FBI’s Art Crime Team, a specialized unit with 16 full-time agents stationed throughout the United States which has recovered more than 2,650 items, valued at more than $160 million, since its inception in 2004.
Meridith Savona photographed at FBI headquarters in New York City on February 26, 2016. KATHERINE MCMAHON With a gun in her holster and her mind in art
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Paul Sumner is rolling up Australian and New Zealand auction businesses to quadruple the size of his Mossgreen’s business. His comments on what’s happening in the Antipodes would seem to be an interesting take on what’s going on in the entire global market for art and collectibles.

Here’s what he told the Australian Financial Review:

“We’re seeing a generation of people who’ve made their wealth as employees; people are paid a lot more than they used to be,” Sumner says. “There’s also a whole new demographic of wealth; same-sex families, double-income families with no children. Many combinations.”

The things people collect to make their lives more aesthetically, emotionally and intellectually tolerable are shifting with these broader societal mores. Stamps have a discrete, devout market that includes many senior businessmen, while the coin market “doesn’t have booms but doesn’t have crashes either”.
Paul Sumner is rolling up Australian and New Zealand auction businesses to quadruple the size of his Mossgreen’s business. His comments on what’s happening in the Antipodes would seem t…
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Scandals have never been in short supply in the world of Russian avant-garde art, but the last few years have seen a bumper crop, with the controversial arrest of a respected Russian curator on fraud charges and, more recently, the attempt by the Russian Ministry of Culture to ban a book full of reproductions of allegedly fake paintings by Russia’s most famous woman artist, Natalia Goncharova.

These were noteworthy events even in this sometimes murky world. Specialists know that most of the Russian avant-garde works available on the market are fakes—ten times as many fakes as genuine works, said James Butterwick, who has been dealing in Russian avant-garde art in London for 20 years, and others in the field backed him up.

These days the major auction houses are extremely cautious and reject any work whose incomplete provenance arouses doubts, but dubious works continue to proliferate in minor auction houses and art galleries all over Europe. Russian and Western experts who certify artworks regularly accuse one another of corruption or negligence.

Now a new organization, the London-based Russian Avant-Garde Research Project (RARP), is entering the field with an ambitious goal. “We want to introduce new standards of scholarship that will help solve the main problems in the field of Russian art history,” said Konstantin Akinsha, one of RARP’s founders and a member of its board.
Natalia Goncharova, Espagnole, 1916, which sold for a record $10.2 million at Christie’s in 2010. Genuine high-quality works like these are few. COURTESY
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Cory Arcangel wants to know what makes you click. Kittens? A candid picture of Leonardo DiCaprio strolling along the beach with his girlfriend? A fuzzy long-lens shot of Victoria Beckham? Images like these are framed on the walls of his new exhibition at the Lisson Gallery, London. Many have also been released into the online world of “clickbait” adverts, enticing readers with offers of hot babes, celebrity revelations and you’ll-never-believe-this dieting tricks.

“They’re really equal – there’s a part of it here in the gallery, and a second part online as clickbait,” says Arcangel, with the gentle, tousled demeanour of a new parent. Five years ago, aged 33, he became the youngest artist since Bruce Nauman to be given a full-floor solo show at the Whitney museum in New York. That show brought together a number of software works in which Arcangel had hacked outmoded computing equipment and games. In Beat the Champ, co-commissioned by the Barbican, a row of bowling games was adapted so the frustrated avatars threw only gutterballs.
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A couple of weeks ago, the opening of SF MoMA prompted Thomas Sevcik, a strategist, to opine in the Financial Times that the creative industries were turning their orientation toward the West, the Far West where tech and Asia converge.

It’s not a bad thesis but then Sevcik tips his empty hand when he starts to riff on the subject of which West Coast creative types might be persuaded to collect art next.

What Sevcik doesn’t seem to know is that there are many people in Tech who already buy heavily and have for a long time. Not just newer tech people like Marc Andreessen but old tech folks like Paul Allen.

This leads to an important question, one that is regularly heard anywhere art impresarios convene: “Will tech buy art?” The success of all these new ventures depends on the hope that the shift from finance to tech as the key wealth generator will happen smoothly. Traditionally, bankers collected art because many of them had a humanities education. Will people educated in digital technology collect art as well? And, for that matter, will Hollywood’s actors and directors, trained in narrative-creation and self-branding, collect art?
A couple of weeks ago, the opening of SF MoMA prompted Thomas Sevcik, a strategist, to opine in the Financial Times that the creative industries were turning their orientation toward the West, the …
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The Art World's Favorite Mind-Altering Substances: A Sociological Study

WITHOUT ALCOHOL, THE ART WORLD AS WE KNOW IT WOULD COLLAPSE!

The most important drug in the art world is alcohol. It works as a legal tool to ease the atmosphere between people with very different statuses and lifestyles who still have to get to know each other or who already know each other far too well. In the world of literature the bond between writers, publishers and critics used to be fuelled by large amounts of alcohol as well, but this stopped happening at the end of the twentieth century. With the digitalisation of accounting and inventory, bookselling became a pretty sober business. In film and music, the situation must be similar. Only the art world remains deeply attached to alcohol. At international art events in strictly Islamic states, it’s impressive to see how willingly the international crowd squeezes into chartered buses, sometimes for an hour or two, to end up in a generic five-star hotel that is licensed to serve booze.
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Whatever your position is in the art world, you'll probably agree that visiting an artist in their studio is a time-honored tradition. Artist studio's offer an intimate look into the artist's work and art practice. You will be able to understand the artist's process better, and get to see art in it its natural habitat, the studio. But there's also plenty that can go wrong. In an effort to help you avoid these pitfalls, artnet News spoke to a couple of New York-based artists to share some of their advice on how to do it right.

1. Don't challenge the artist or ask overly personal questions
An artist we interviewed said she was once told to "freeze her eggs." Don't be that guy. We suggest that on your studio visit, you avoid making such personal comments. A studio is a creative and personal space. But it's also a professional one, so professional and social etiquette rules apply. Remember the reasons why you decided to visit in the first place and try to stick to questions and comments about the work. While the egg-freezing comment was probably intended as some kind of compliment of the desirability of the artist's genetic make-up, it's way too weird and personal.
Visiting an artist in her studio is a time-honored tradition; here's what you need to know to have it go swimmingly.
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A new survey from wealth management firm US Trust points to a deep generational divide between how younger and older art collectors think about their holdings. Among other findings, the "Insights on Wealth and Worth" study suggests that rich millennials might be in for a surprise about the future value of their collections.

US Trust is the private wealth management arm of Bank of America, which sponsors major museum exhibitions, lends money to collectors against their art assets, and handles the finances of various American museums. US Trust has been doing similar studies of very wealthy Americans for several years, but this is the first time they've asked their respondents about art. The report is based on a survey of 684 "high net worth and ultra high net worth adults" nationwide, with assets totaling north of $3 million.

Some of the study's findings might be comforting to those who believe that art's principal worth is aesthetic, intellectual, or cultural. For example, three-quarters of collectors surveyed say their primary reason for collecting is art's aesthetic value.
A new study by US Trust sheds some light on millennials' ideas about the value of their art collections, and finds that they may be missing the point.
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Art crime existed before the Second World War, but Hitler’s systematic theft and destruction of Europe’s great collections serves as a kind of year zero for its representation in popular culture. This subgenre persists to this day, evidence of the perception by Hollywood—not to mention the wider public—that the art world is largely a criminal operation, populated with white-collar crooks and shallow victims.

It is estimated that as few as 5 to 10 percent of stolen artworks are ever recovered, and the grand scale of the Nazis’ crime has left a vast space for speculation about what may have happened to great paintings by Rembrandt, Vermeer, and van Gogh—an imaginative gap which Hollywood has taken upon itself to fill. As in the case of Dr. No, cinema provides stolen masterpieces a fictional afterlife, assigning them to an array of filthy rich villains: Modigliani’s Woman with a Fan (1919) and Picasso’s Le pigeon aux petits pois (1911), both unrecovered, make appearances in the collection of Bond nemesis Ernst Stavro Blofeld (Christoph Waltz) in Sam Mendes’s Spectre (2015). Cinema theorizes the lives and motives of a brand of criminals so rarely brought to justice, alternately glorifying and vilifying the forgers, thieves, and black marketeers who operate in the shadows of the art market.
Film still of Sterling Hayden in Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing, 1956. COURTESY THE CRITERION COLLECTION On August 21, 1961, Francisco Goya’s Portrait of the
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Solomon's Collections
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Education
  • Business and Art Schools
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Tagline
Artist, Entrepreneur, Photographer, Poet
Introduction
Solomon Walker is a Professional Artist and Photographer who has been drawing and painting since the age of 11. He creates “fine art” from emotions and philosophy. His work is influenced and inspired by various aspects of life, of living, and a whole host of worldly issues. His formal artistic education took him through technical schools, workshops and personal tutorship. His specialized training includes Anatomy, Sculpture, Portraiture, Graphics Design and Print Making, Illustration, Computer Graphics, Painting, Drawing, Typography, Fashion design, Photography and Video-graphy. His artistic influences include Realism, Abstract Expressionism, Cubism, Conceptual, Dadaism, plus other modernist art movements. In creating his unique pieces, Solomon likes to work in a blend of abstracts and conceptual forms, arriving at a final look that is truly his own.

Solomon has been awarded for his work in both fine art and photography and, his work can be found displayed on various online art and photo galleries.


Work
Occupation
CEO, Museum of Digital Fine Arts (MoDFA)
Skills
drawing, painting, photography, illustration, sculpture, computers, photoshop, graphics art, business, management, writing, editing, social media
Employment
  • Museum of Digital Fine Arts
    CEO, present
    The Founder and Principle of the Museum of Digital Fine Arts, which spotlight and showcases established and emerging artists and photographers along with their incredible work in monthly exhibitions. Solomon's duties encompass management, curating, marketing, writing, social media, talent search, and much more.
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Currently
Toronto, Canada
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CDiscover Webydo
discover2.webydo.com

Webydo is a professional website design platform that empowers graphic and web designers to craft pixel-perfect responsive websites for thei

Nazis, Con Men, Forgers, And Thieves: Art Crime In Postwar Cinema | ARTnews
www.artnews.com

Film still of Sterling Hayden in Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing, 1956. COURTESY THE CRITERION COLLECTION On August 21, 1961, Francisco Goya’s

Nice Museum. Where’s the Art? - The New Yorker
www.newyorker.com

Museum leaders today would be condemned were they not punctilious about creating spaces where all are ostentatiously welcomed, encouraged to

May Auctions In New York Totaled $1.2 Billion, About Half Of November Ha...
www.artnews.com

Christie's New York headquarters at Rockefeller Plaza.COURTESY CHRISTIE’S The May sales of Impressionist, modern, and contemporary art in Ne

Chéri Samba, 'I am the man who eats paint,' 2005.
www.wsj.com

Chéri Samba, 'I am the man who eats paint,' 2005.

Theft! Forgery! Murder!: Art History’s Greatest Crimes | ARTnews
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Bank Robber Aiming at Security Camera, Cleveland, Ohio, March 8, 1975, on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art's exhibition "Crime Stories

What does it mean to "buy" digital art? - The Space
www.thespace.org

How do you buy or sell a piece of digital art? Sam Sedgman explores notions of ownership in a digital age.

‘Absolutely Gross, Degenerate Stuff’: Trump And The Arts | ARTnews
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Andy Warhol, Trump Tower, 1981.COURTESY ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS, INC. In the spring of 1994, an artist named Paul Rebhan

Artexpo New York 2016
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April 14-17, 2016 — Pier 94, new art by 1000s of contemporary artists, painters, sculptors, illustrators

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To save articles or get newsletters, alerts or recommendations – all free. Don't have an account yet? Create an account ». Subscribed throug

Are there really only seven different types of beauty? | Art and design ...
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Extravagant, transgressive, elemental ... the Cooper Hewitt design museum in New York has taxonomised the indefinable – beauty. Is this wron

Vancouver Artist Wins €110,000 Hasselblad Award - Canadian Art
canadianart.ca

Canadian photo-based artist Stan Douglas has won the prestigious Hasselblad Foundation International Award in Photography.

Picabia Alert #11: ‘Pa’ at Venus | ARTnews
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Francis Picabia, Pa, ca. 1934, oil on canvas, 29½ x 27 inches.COURTESY VENUS OVER MANHATTAN “Picabia Alert” takes note of shows and publicat

Go for the Gold
blog.3x3mag.com

It’s that time of year again. Time to enter the one true international illustration awards show. Open to all illustrators in all countries.

2015 | ARTnews
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Saint Helena, California, St. Louis, Missouri Winemaking (Bryant Family Vineyard) and insurance. American Masters of the 20th Century, Germa

ProFlare
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Easily add beautiful, epic, or vintage lighting to any footage in FCPX with ProFlare by Pixel Film Studios, a collection of over 150 profess

Indonesia to Get its First Modern and Contemporary Art Museum in 2017 | ...
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A rendering of the Museum MACAN facade.COURTESY MUSEUM MACAN A new institution in Jakarta, Indonesia, will be the country's first museum foc

always a family hot-spot for many generations, Ontario Place provides folks from all-walks-of-life the opportunity to get out and enjoy the blissful sun-drenched days of summer at the edge of the lake in beautiful city of Toronto...with live concerts in the open-air, boat rides, picnics, water rides, food and entertainment of all variety, it's a place you can escape to and never want to ever leave!
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reviewed 2 years ago
just a stone throw from ritzy Yorkville, the Design Exchange a great place to visit and take in amazing design inspirations from designers of all specialization right in the heart of beautiful Toronto, Canada.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
amazing place, especially for children, but, adults will definitely enjoy it too. and although it's not in the rush of the city, it's only a short ride from the exciting entertainment venues at Yonge/Eglington. A great place year-round!
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reviewed 2 years ago
with old world elegance and charm, this beautiful theatre center is a fabulous spot in the heart of the beautiful city of Toronto, Canada.
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reviewed 2 years ago
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a wonderful place for curious and creative folks, situated right in the heart of the city, and just across the street from the ROM (near Avenue Rd. & Bloor St.).
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
a mainstay in the heart of the bustling city of Toronto, AGO is a fabulous was place to spent time viewing art masterpieces and other cultural treasures from the past and the present too.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
just a really awesome spot in the beautiful cosmopolitan city of Toronto. For year-round fun, it's hard to think of spending your urban moments any place else than at the lovely Harbourfront Centre and surround area.
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reviewed 2 years ago