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Sodbuster Farms, Inc
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From farm to pint for five generations.
From farm to pint for five generations.

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Removed of their hop cones, the bines are dropped from the line and into a chopper—where they are combined with other materials (such as leaves and twigs) and moved along to the waste bin.
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After getting raked by the fingers, the hop cones, leaves and parts of the bine are processed through the dribble belts. The rounded heavy hop cones fall back and down through the belts and along to be dried, while the leaves and sticks (lighter material that won't roll down the dribble belts) are carried along to the waste bin.
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2014-10-14
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Because the pressure and moisture in compressed bales of hops can cause spontaneous combustion, moisture levels are meticulously monitored during the drying process.  Here, a moisture meter is used to take several readings from one of the drying kilns.
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Picked from their bines, the floral hops cones are carried by overhead belt to the dryer (an oast house), where they will be dried and baled. Kilns, separated by short walls, are blown by hot air from below for several hours until the hops have the perfect moisture for processing. 
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After the bines have been hooked, they travel up in a line to start their journey through the hop picker. 
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The "top cutter" chops the twine and hops bines off of the trellis and lays them in a truckbed to be taken to the processing facility, or "hop picker".
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Mature hop bines (similar to vines) hang from the trellis system in the setting sun. Nearly ready to be harvested, these bines will soon be cut and the flower cones will be removed, dried and shipped. 
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The flower with a mighty power. The hops cone, humulus lupulus, adds a distinctive bitter flavor to beer, and acts as a natural preservative. Months of growing and intensive harvesting brings this bud from farm to pint.
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The completed product! Dried and baled hops are loaded into a truck for shipping to your favorite brewers (for your favorite beers).
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Hooking hops up to the machine that will "pick" the flower cones from the bines (hop vines).
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