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Sobel Tomas
Works at till3am s.r.o.
Lives in Brno, Czech republic
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Sobel Tomas

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Jsem pořád zmatenější a zmatenější ohledně přístupu Googlu k Youtube a G+. Mají vůbec nějakou koncepci? Ve kterým trezoru ji schovávají?
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WoW!
A directory of wonderful things: boingboing.net
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Člověk by si skoro řekl, že se tady ten formulář cítí tak nějak... nevyužitě. Je potřeba mu při pátku dodat trochu důstojnosti. #Patek
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První plnohodnotný trailer na film Avengers: Age Ultron měl být zveřejněn až v rámci příští epizody seriálu Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., jelikož se ale předčasně dostal do spárů Hydry, musel ho Marvel spolu i s novým plakátem zveřejnit už dnes. Co na něj říkáte?

http://www.edna.cz/avengers/novinky/prvni-oficialni-trailer-pro-avengers-age-of-ultron/
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Já prostě nejsem tady tu věc schopnej používat :-D Vždycky čtvrt roku zapomenu, že vůbec existuje...
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Co ste za lidi?!
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Jůůů JSON formatter pro Chrome, by +Pavel Bier 
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Ah, the majestic Horseshoe crab. Scientifically known as Limulus polyphemus, this creature not only looks like a tank, but is a real blue blood. That is, the horseshoe crab literally bleeds blue. This is due to their blood containing copper associated hemocyanin for oxygen transport rather than hemoglobin, the transport protein which also gives our blood its red color. 

Now, you're probably wondering, why the hell would anyone want to capture and bleed a horseshoe crab? Well, I'm sure there are a number of reasons, and I'm sure all of them are very good. However, I am only personally concerned with their amebocytes as I've heard they taste rather rubbery. Besides, after the bleeding, I hear they're returned to the ocean (probably because nothing else wants to eat them either). 

Moving on, there is something very interesting that happens when you combine Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) with a nasty little molecule known as Lipopolysaccharide (LPS). I suppose it is unfair to call LPS nasty since it's not really toxic or anything, but because it resides and is expelled from the cell walls of Gram negative bacteria, our silly human bodies think it's the end of the world. I suppose you could liken the process to propaganda. LPS normally alerts the immune system to a deadly bacterial infection in the blood or deep tissue, so even if it's found freely floating about and not attached to any bacteria at all, the immune system blows the whole thing out of proportion and generates a massive immune response. This includes inflammation, but what's most dangerous is the fever. It's kind of like cellular fear mongering.

LPS is known as a Pyrogen or fever generating substance, and this can be a problem because it's pretty much everywhere in large-enough-to-kill-you quantities (1 nanogram per kilogram is baseline for pyrogenic activity in mammals), and it's not easy to destroy. Now, before you freak out and take a hydrogen peroxide bath (this would effectively oxidize the molecule, but is not at all recommended), know that it still has to end up in your blood before your body decides it's world war III and tries to save you by killing you. This makes it a pretty big obstacle for Hospitals, since much of the healing they do involves jabbing you with sharp things that pump stuff directly into your blood. So how do you avoid giving your patients a deadly fever every time you stick them with an IV? 

It's all in the blood. 

Well, in limulus blood, that is. Getting back to our horseshoe crab friends, the amebocytes in their blood contain coagulogen, a protein which forms a clot when it comes into contact with the LPS molecule, even if it is not attached to a bacterium's cell wall. We've managed to take advantage of this quality by processing the blood into various types of test enzymes capable of detecting extremely small quantities of LPS. This allows for spot testing of medical equipment and fluids (before they enter your body), and has saved countless patients from complications due to pyrogenic endotoxin. If not for this, we'd still be trying to detect LPS contamination by giving lots of fuzzy bunnies fevers, and nobody likes a hot bunny, let alone thousands of them. 

Well, there it is. Horseshoe crabs save lives. Try to remember that next time you're at the beach and you almost step on one. 

Photo via Fresh Photons 
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aha, pěkné ... mě nedošlo, že je to nějaká potvora, viděl jsem v tom zašlej kus měděnýho čehosi... :]
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The Nakasendo is an old road in Japan that connects Kyoto to Tokyo. It was once a major foot highway, but today small sections retain some of its historical feel. In October I walked along 5 short sections of it, staying at traditional inns along the way. My guide was +Craig Mod who is fluent in Japanese, his ease with the language made the trip possible. And he is a great travel companion (he took the picture of me in the onsen). The Nakasendo is full of history and many artists and poets over the centuries have travelled along it, including Basho, the haiku genius. We met a lot of characters, too, and thoroughly enjoyed the exquisite details that make up this country.
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SCIENCE BITCHES
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Writing Makes Photographers More Creative — 5 Easy Tips

http://bit.ly/11MSxFW

Getting personal and a little scientific here…

Once our basic three needs are met (and often even when they’re not), there exists within the human species a hard-wired desire to pursue happiness. For me, happiness has always been inextricably linked with creativity, the two enjoying a direct relationship. The happier I am, the more creative I am. Or more metaphysically speaking, the happier I am, the more open I am to inspiration and creativity. As if joy, laughter and contentedness can fine-tune the antennae that allow inspiration to be channeled from the Creative Source.

There are myriad studies and books that link journaling to happiness. Turns out journaling is a powerful tool that not only unsticks the blocked Creator but also increases happiness. Turns out it’s not just for junior high girls.

Like Julia Cameron’s “The Artist’s Way” which pours on and on about wonders of journaling, I make regular “artist’s dates” (read the book or infer as you will), and keep “morning pages,” where I write, first thing, every day. The practice, Cameron insists, is not just for the writer. Any “artist” — be you painter, screenwriter or photographer — will benefit from getting the “juices flowing.” I can attest to this. When I’m on it, I’m ON it creatively.

[aside, I use Evernote for my journaling - allows me to pull my journals up anywhere, computer, ipad, iphone...]

But the other benefit of regular journaling, it turns out, is an elevated mood. University of Hertfordshire psychology professor Richard Wiseman wrote the research-backed “59 Seconds: Think a Little, Change a Lot” which boils down peer-reviewed scientific studies on happiness into an entertaining, simple reduction. Ultimately, journaling distills into five main types, the conjunction of which can have a profound impact on one’s happiness:

1) Expressive Writing. Put your feelings down on paper and watch your self-esteem grow and your smile widen.

2) Gratitude Journaling. There’s been plenty of this bandied around the web recently, and for good reason. Spend 15 minutes listing that which you are grateful for.

3) Describe your Perfect Self. Recall a time in your life when everything just…clicked. That amazing experience. A high point in your happiness history.

4) Affectionate Writing. Now this one is win-win: Write to a person you love or care about and tell them how much they mean to you and why.

5) Progressive Review. Make a record of all that is going well in your life. Note the progress you’ve made towards goals you have set. Don’t dwell on the obstacles — focus on the breakthroughs.

Sure, it’s becoming a challenge to fit into each day all the stuff we should do. Between the daily exercise, yoga, meditation and to-do listing it’s hard enough to find time for the 9-5 stuff that MUST get done. But the rewards of happiness — as opposed to the age-old mentality of the tortured, brooding artist — are too substantial — and immediate — to be ignored.

If only blogging counted…but it doesn’t…. Skip that b/s email to a buddy and write for 10 minutes everyday next week.

http://bit.ly/11MSxFW
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Our friend and hero Paul Schlemmer is heading to gulf photo plus and because he's classy, he will try to hitch a ride http://buff.ly/1o82Axc
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Have him in circles
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Lukáš Nový's profile photo
jara sijka's profile photo
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