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SkippersMate Australia - New Zealand (SkippersMate)
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Peter J Hackett has a passion for saving lives at sea and on land! SOLASOL
Peter J Hackett has a passion for saving lives at sea and on land! SOLASOL

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Thermal imaging has been around for decades, but until recently it was only affordable for the Government and the Military. However technological advances have changed all that and now everyday people can buy thermal products at affordable prices.

Thermal Imagers are now being used for everyday outdoor adventure activities, land search & rescue (SES) organisations and marine rescues.

The Pulsar Quantum XQ30V Thermal Imager / Camera are designed for use both at night and in the daylight. They are also able to be used in inclement weather conditions (fog, smog, rain) and to see through obstacles hindering detection of targets (branches, tall grass, thick bushes etc.).

Unlike image intensifier tube based night vision devices, Quantum thermal imaging scopes do not require an external source of light and are not affected by bright light exposure.
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Here we will demonstrate how to test your KTi SA2G GPS 406MHz Personal Locator Beacon (PLB) purchased from SkippersMate Australia or New Zealand. The video will show how it is possible to perform the one hand action. Any questions, please call me... Peter J Hackett, just Google me.
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Here we demonstrate how to activate your KTi Safety Alert 406MHz GPS Personal Locator Beacon PLB purchased from SkippersMate Australia or New Zealand. The video will show how it is possible to perform the action with one hand in a matter of seconds.
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Distress Beacons are not all the same...
EPIRB | PLB EDUCATION: What to look for when buying or hiring a beacon...

406 MHz distress beacons are highly sophisticated pieces of electronic engineering designed to save lives.

Understanding how they and the global safety system works is not only interesting but might also assist in determining what sort of devices would best suit your particular outdoor activity.

It is recommended that distress beacon owners and potential owners or users of beacons familiarise themselves with regulations and recommendations regarding the carrying of ELT, EPIRBs or PLBs relevant to their particular outdoor activity and the steps required to ensure the beacon is registered with the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) or the New Zealand Rescue Coordination Centre New Zealand (RCCNZ).

The major consideration when purchasing a beacon is normally whether to purchase an EPIRB or a PLB, as an ELT is normally purchased and installed as a Civil Aviation Authority requirement.

PLBs are typically smaller and from an electronic perspective are exactly the same as an EPIRB. Both transmit the same burst of half second data at exactly the same power output at exactly the same time intervals, both transmit a constant 0.25 watt homing signal and both are required to be waterproof. But that is where the similarity ends.

It is important to understand the differences between an EPIRB and a PLB, these are:

EPIRB standards require all EPIRBs to float the right way up when in the water and that they have an operating battery life of at least 48 hours.
PLB standards have no requirement to float the right way up when in the water, only to have the ability to float in Australia and New Zealand and only require an operating battery life of at least 24 hours.

Before purchasing or hiring a beacon it is important to consider a number of factors:
1. The purpose for which the beacon is being purchased or hired
regulations concerning the type of beacon to be carried.
2. The technical capability of the beacon to not only alert, activate and also locate by the use of an inbuilt strobe light.

More information is available at: SkippersMate Beacons
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Pulsar Digiforce digital night vision monocular scopes are a new generation using built-in eyesafe invisible IR illumination. 3 models to choose from. The X970 with a 2x zoom has a 400 metre range and a record output feature to capture those target shots.
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Vortex New 2016 Diamondback Binocular series with high quality optics and a lifetime - no questions asked - Australian New Zealand warranty. Shop securely online or phone +61418776862. Quote SMATE05 for an extra discount offer.
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2016-08-12
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EPIRB | PLB EDUCATION: What to look for when buying or hiring a beacon...

406 MHz distress beacons are highly sophisticated pieces of electronic engineering designed to save lives.

Understanding how they and the global safety system works is not only interesting but might also assist in determining what sort of devices would best suit your particular outdoor activity.

It is recommended that distress beacon owners and potential owners or users of beacons familiarise themselves with regulations and recommendations regarding the carrying of ELT, EPIRBs or PLBs relevant to their particular outdoor activity and the steps required to ensure the beacon is registered with the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) or the New Zealand Rescue Coordination Centre New Zealand (RCCNZ).

The major consideration when purchasing a beacon is normally whether to purchase an EPIRB or a PLB, as an ELT is normally purchased and installed as a Civil Aviation Authority requirement.

PLBs are typically smaller and from an electronic perspective are exactly the same as an EPIRB. Both transmit the same burst of half second data at exactly the same power output at exactly the same time intervals, both transmit a constant 0.25 watt homing signal and both are required to be waterproof. But that is where the similarity ends.

It is important to understand the differences between an EPIRB and a PLB, these are:

EPIRB standards require all EPIRBs to float the right way up when in the water and that they have an operating battery life of at least 48 hours.
PLB standards have no requirement to float the right way up when in the water, only to have the ability to float in Australia and New Zealand and only require an operating battery life of at least 24 hours.

Before purchasing or hiring a beacon it is important to consider a number of factors:
1. The purpose for which the beacon is being purchased or hired
regulations concerning the type of beacon to be carried.
2. The technical capability of the beacon to not only alert, activate and also locate by the use of an inbuilt strobe light.

More information is available at: SkippersMate Beacons
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KTi SA2G PLB activated to transmit signal to global satellite network
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Vortex New Diamondback 10x42 Binocular Review:
Brand NEW to the Australian New Zealand market place!
Completely redesigned for 2016, the Vortex Diamondback 10x42 binocular has an all new optical system with enhanced, dielectric fully multi-coated lenses producing stunning views and an impressive low-light performance - critical features when working to glass up and evaluate your target.
High-performance, Lifetime warranty hunting optics around your neck for an affordable price.
The new Diamondback dielectric coating on the glass was previously a feature reserved only for the Viper HD and Razor HD binoculars.
"This makes the optics even better for clarity than the previous generation."

http://www.skippersmate.com.au/vortex-new-diamondback-10x42-binocular/waterproof
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EPIRB REVIEW - (Emergency Positioning Indicating Radio Beacon) are available in two types - with and without GPS coordinates capability. The GPS model will transmit your coordinates to within 120 metres, whereas the non-GPS search zone can be up to 5 miles. WHY the difference? GPS is transmitting every 5 minutes to stationary satellites. The non-GPS requires the passing of two satellites, possibly up to 90 minutes per pass. Why 5 miles? - if the current and tide carries you in the water and it takes 90 minutes to get a fix on your location, you are now well beyond the original MOB location.

Check now the specifications of your EPIRB. If you paid a low price for it, chances are it is a non-PS model. Seriously consider an upgrade and save the time floating in the water for your kids sake!

Have you registered your EPIRB with AMSA - Canberra?

http://www.skippersmate.com.au/distress-beacons/epirb-plb-beacon
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