Profile

Cover photo
Simon Phipps
Works at Wipro Technologies
17,217 followers|2,335,256 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube+1'sReviews

Stream

Simon Phipps

Shared publicly  - 
 
Live from #OSCON this Wednesday.
 
Confirmed for our OSCON show: Heather McKelvey - Basho Update (http://basho.com) interviewed by +Randal L. Schwartz and +Simon Phipps.
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Simon Phipps

Shared publicly  - 
 
Presumably the silly copycat not-an-Apple-stores will be next, followed eventually by Surface?
 
Nadella's decision to take a chainsaw to Microsoft's phone business was the only logical option
View original post
2
Gordon Haff's profile photoImmanuel Schweizer's profile photo
3 comments
 
+Gordon Haff I'm not saying they are sucessful in mobile. There mobile OS is not sucessful. I was just adding the fact that they are not going to abandon it.

And Surface is almost a billion dollar per quarter business now (as by the numbers cited above). Which is a success in my book. And compared to the XBox that is a much faster road to success.
Add a comment...

Simon Phipps

Shared publicly  - 
 
Interesting argument. Not that any government anywhere cares much.
 
The use of encrypted, coded & secret communications is an Ancient Liberty protected by the United States Constitution
The Use of Encrypted, Coded and Secret Communications is an "Ancient Liberty" Protected by the United States Constitution. by John A. Fraser, III[*]. I. Introduction II. The Constitution Protects Ancient Liberties. A. An Overview of Ancient Liberties in Communications and Expression ...
View original post
10
1
Måns Rullgård's profile photoThiago Macieira's profile photoSteven Oliver's profile photo
2 comments
 
Of course the complexity of the cipher needs to be comparable to the computing capacity of the time.
Add a comment...

Simon Phipps

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Irresponsible or unavoidable borrowing?

Growing up in Europe, I didn't pay much attention to the construction of the Euro, and whatever little I remember has nothing to do with the economics of it. Now, older, having lived in the US for a while, with a Greek wife, I'm looking at the way the Euro is unraveling and I've been using the opportunity to try to figure out how it works (or, rather, why it doesn't).

The core mechanism that allows multiple states to share the same currency is pretty simple: since the weaker states can't devalue their currency to compensate for their trade deficit with the stronger ones, money has to flow from the stronger economies to the weaker ones in order to maintain the balance.

We see that in the US: as measured in GDP per capita, there's about a 2:1 ratio between the strongest states and the weakest ones. To compensate for that, a lot of money flows between states, through the federal government. Most taxes in the US are federal taxes, i.e. about 75%, and the federal government doesn't necessarily spend the money it collects in the exact states where it collects them. As an example, every year about 130 billion dollars paid by California in federal taxes don't make it back into California. Texas and New York are the two other states that have a negative balance of more than 100 billion each. For those 3 states, that outflow on money represents 5.7%, 7.2% and 7.4% of their respective GDPs. California is literally sending money to other states so that those states can buy California stuff. The same is true for Texas, New York, and about 20 of the 50 states that are sending money to the other 30.

Looking back in history, the Marshall Plan followed a somewhat similar logic: the US sent aid to Europe, to allow Europeans to buy US goods, which was both a stabilizing mechanism for European currencies that otherwise were in a devaluation spiral, and an outlet for the huge US industrial production. For reference, the Marshall Plan amounted to 120 billion dollars (in today's dollars) over 4 years, which is tiny compared to the amount of money that the federal government now redistributes across state lines.

We can compare that to the situation in the Eurozone/EU, where the GDP per capita varies by a factor of about 2.3:1. Germany's balance in the EU budget is negative by less than 9 billion Euros. France's and Italy's follow at approximately 6.5 billion and 6 billion. Germany's 9 billion Euros is tiny compared to California's 130 billion dollars, especially since Germany's GDP is 60% larger than that of California. Since the US and EU economies have approximately the same size, that's a reasonably apples-to-apples comparison. The biggest negative balance that a Eurozone country has with the EU is about 0.41% of its GDP. The biggest positive balance is 1.3%. Within the US, only 4 states out of 50 fall within that range.

That's the problem right there: Germany is not flowing enough money out to other Eurozone countries to compensate for its own very strong economy. That's true of other rich European countries as well, e.g. Netherlands, Austria, France.

From the Greek point of view, the only way to get that money to flow in order to maintain balance had been for the government to borrow. That wasn't irresponsible borrowing. That was mechanical, predictable. Greece's poor historical discipline around government finances only accelerated an unavoidable process, but it's not a root cause.

In fact, predictably, pushing Greece into austerity made things worse, much worse: with the root cause being Greece's relatively weak economy compared to the rest of the Eurozone, an austerity approach can only put Greece in a position where it needs even more money to flow in in order to maintain balance.

Even if we assume that all of Greece's debts get somehow forgiven with no further constraints and that Greece manages to run a balanced government budget, it would still be in an unsustainable position in the current Eurozone as its weaker economy would force additional money to flow in. Unless the Eurozone very significantly increases the amount of money that it redistributes across borders, Greece should get out of the Euro at the first opportunity, i.e. literally Monday morning, July 6.

Worse, with Greece out, it's only a matter of time for another weak country to find itself in the same position: that might be Portugal, Spain, Italy, or if Bulgaria, Romania or even Hungary join quickly enough that might go through that same death spiral quickly enough to see the Eurozone as a revolving door, with barely enough time to come in before being back out.

Once that first batch of weak countries is out, there'll always be more that'll be at the bottom of the scale and will find themselves in the same position. France is comfortably in the middle of the pack within Europe today, but attrition will eventually push it toward the bottom, and France having to leave the Euro is a true nightmare scenario for everyone.

In order for the Eurozone to survive, its rich members will need to send a lot more money to the poorer ones: the rich ones literally can't continue reaping benefits from a currency based on the European average without sharing those benefits with the poorer ones that bring that European average down. Otherwise, the Euro will consume country after country until it hits a country that is literally too big to fail.
175 comments on original post
3
3
Frank Kieviet's profile photoDick Davies's profile photo
Add a comment...

Simon Phipps

Shared publicly  - 
 
I noticed a jump in the price of bitcoin -- this must be the explanation.
 
Greeks are turning to Bitcoin as the money runs out
Bitcoin could be one answer to restricted cashflow in Greece, according to a report by Al Jazeera.
View original post
8
2
Chris Harpner (CSharpner)'s profile photoEdward Morbius's profile photoKevin Jones's profile photoFarrel Buchinsky's profile photo
2 comments
 
I don't see what this solves:

1. Greeks cannot access cash anyway. How do they pay for Bitcoin?
2. Now you've got Bitcoin. Who's going to accept it?

The one case that does seem to make sense: you have a working credit card and want to move cash out-of-country. Buy Bitcoin, sell it outside Greece, set up a bank account in Euro.
Add a comment...

Simon Phipps

Shared publicly  - 
 
While the SFLC amicus brief suggests this is the correct outcome, I feel that the obviously wrong Federal Circuit judgement should not have been allowed to stand as it is bound to be used as part of a blackmail attempt against developers somewhere. 

SFLC's amicus supporting Oracle's win is here: https://www.softwarefreedom.org/resources/2014/google_v_oracle-sflc_cert_amicus.html
 
Sad day for developers: SCOTUS denies Google's appeal on APIs
Supreme Court's decision is bad news for developers targeting the U.S. market, who will now have to avoid any API not explicitly licensed as open
View original post
9
Simon Phipps's profile photoMichael Bennett's profile photoAlan Cox's profile photoSteven Vaughan-Nichols's profile photo
12 comments
 
+Simon Phipps Well said. I'm going to quote you on my piece on this mess. 
Add a comment...

Simon Phipps

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
This article debunking their Snowden story explains clearly why The Sunday Times owes us a serious explanation
Let's start with this. Soon after Daniel Ellsberg was revealed as the source behind the Pentagon Papers, White House officials started spreading rumors that Ellsberg was actually a Soviet spy and that he'd passed on important secrets to the...
View original post
8
2
Brendan Minish (bminish)'s profile photoJustin Lee's profile photoBruno Vernay's profile photo
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
17,217 people
Steven Merckx's profile photo
zio benny's profile photo
Matt Ingenthron's profile photo
Harun Mercan's profile photo
George Paul's profile photo
atul mishra's profile photo
Flivio D'Andrea's profile photo
Keith Poole's profile photo
brian vessells's profile photo

Simon Phipps

Shared publicly  - 
 
Want a job that will make LibreOffice better for all of us?
The Document Foundation (TDF), the charitable entity behind the world’s leading free office suite LibreOffice, seeks a Development Mentoring Lead to start work as soon as possible. The role, which is scheduled for 20 hours a week, includes amongst other items: Helping new contributors to get started with LibreOffice code including: building LibreOffice getting started with pat ...
View original post
2
Add a comment...

Simon Phipps

Shared publicly  - 
 
A good interview.
 
A look at what's on the horizon for LibreOffice
The Document Foundation's Italo Vignoli shares his experiences as a founding member, employee, and volunteer with LibreOffice, as well as what's on the horizon for the open source project.
View original post
2
1
Dick Davies's profile photo
Add a comment...

Simon Phipps

Shared publicly  - 
 
If you want to come to OSCON and need a pass, I can arrange a free Expo-only pass that's good for Wednesday, Thursday and all on-site networking events for anyone who knows my e-mail address and asks for one.
3
Add a comment...

Simon Phipps

Shared publicly  - 
 
There was a time in politics when this sort of hypocrisy would have mattered and affected the outcome.
20
2
Art Cancro (IGnatius T Foobar)'s profile photoGeorge Greene's profile photoAlberto Ruiz's profile photoMuddy Jill's profile photo
5 comments
 
Looking at how the Labor Unions milk every dime then use hero power keep thing cost high than they should ..
We work and want more and more and demand  better pay  this raise the cost  as the more you pay the workers the more they charger for some that cost $0.50 to make and charge  $100 up
Add a comment...

Simon Phipps

Shared publicly  - 
 
I got some sarcastic comments from The Register about offering a print version of the huge IPR report when a free PDF was available to download, so it must be the right thing to do!  

The printed book looks good (that cover photo is of the blinds in my kitchen).  Any net proceeds will be donated to a charity nominated by David Anderson.
 
My print copy of A Question Of Trust by David Anderson just arrived from Lulu - far better than a PDF! http://wmk.me/1LdOgzZ
View original post
4
Thomas Pfeiffer's profile photoSimon Phipps's profile photoAndrew Wilson's profile photo
5 comments
 
A tip of the hat to Depeche Mode!  "It's a question of trust, it's a question of lust, it's a question of not letting what we've built up crumble to dust" indeed.
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
17,217 people
Steven Merckx's profile photo
zio benny's profile photo
Matt Ingenthron's profile photo
Harun Mercan's profile photo
George Paul's profile photo
atul mishra's profile photo
Flivio D'Andrea's profile photo
Keith Poole's profile photo
brian vessells's profile photo
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Tagline
Grizzled and eclectic geek, campaigning for digital rights.
Introduction
Director of open source consulting at Wipro, president at the Open Source Initiative and a director at the Open Rights Group; writer, speaker and consultant on digital liberty, especially open source policy and practice.
Work
Occupation
Consultant, Writer & Speaker
Skills
Open Source and Digital Rights
Employment
  • Wipro Technologies
    Director, 2015 - present
  • Meshed Insights Ltd
    Director, 2013 - present
  • Meshed Insights & Knowledge
    Independent Consultant, 2011 - 2013
  • ForgeRock
    Chief Strategy Officer, 2010 - 2011
  • Sun Microsystems
    Chief Open Source Officer, 2000 - 2010
  • IBM
    Chief Java Evangelist, 1995 - 2000
  • IBM
    Conferencing Systems, 1990 - 1995
  • Unisys
    BTOS/CTOS Specialist, 1987 - 1990
  • Burroughs
    Medium Systems Specialist, 1982 - 1987
Simon Phipps's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Microsoft Outlook Preview
market.android.com

La aplicación oficial de Microsoft Outlook para teléfonos con sistema Android y tabletas. Outlook es una aplicación gratuita de correo elect

LibreOffice Viewer Beta
market.android.com

LibreOffice is the world's most popular Open Source office app - and now it's on Android.This app is in active development, and not yet stab

VNC® Viewer for Google Chrome™
chrome.google.com

Connects to your computers anywhere in the world and lets you take control.

SomaPlayer
chrome.google.com

Listen to SomaFM web radio stations from your browser and scrobble tracks to your Last.fm account.

No, Citrix did not kill CloudStack
www.infoworld.com

CloudStack's lifeblood is its user community, so the Citrix shakeup is much ado about nothing

SAP embraces opens source -- sort of
www.infoworld.com

Years of slow change are finally leading to new openness at SAP, at least in connection with SAP HANA

The Internet's Own Boy
market.android.com

Available Same Day as Theaters. A dynamic and tragic portrait of the life of Reddit co-founder and computer prodigy Aaron Swartz, a champion

App.net's open source failure
www.infoworld.com

The company's business model put up too many barriers, and it's hard to compete without flexibility for all

Stop laying the blame for Heartbleed on open source
www.infoworld.com

Security experts acknowledge that open source is the best model for crypto, so how do we drive improvements to the model for creating securi

Sony and Google gang up for an illegal video takedown
www.infoworld.com

Sony's drive-by copyright takedown illustrates the harm old business models can do to new approaches like open source

As She Is
www.indiegogo.com

This film project is about a personal and collective journey towards wholeness...to reclaim, value and live the feminine aspect of ourselves

Microsoft opens .Net but misses the point with mobile
www.infoworld.com

Unprecedented change continues to flow from Microsoft. But does the company really 'get it'?

Supreme Court set for landmark decision -- good or bad -- on software pa...
www.infoworld.com

The Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank case has reached the Supreme Court, and expectations run high that we may finally get clarity on the legality of

Open document standards will cure Apple's bit rot
www.infoworld.com

Apple's iWork update won't let you access documents created as little as five years ago. The solution is obvious

Meshed Insights Ltd
plus.google.com

Expertise in open source and digital liberties.

5 bitcoin exchanges you can use right now
www.infoworld.com

Mt. Gox's failure might have grabbed the headlines, but reputable bitcoin exchanges remain up and running and ready for business

2014 is the year of the Linux desktop
www.infoworld.com

Linux has unexpectedly made it to the desktop through mobile and cloud, but the unintended consequences are troubling

My great bitcoin adventure: 6 months, 5 exchanges
www.infoworld.com

Bitcoin's open source foundation is sound, but Bitstamp, CEX.IO, Coinbase, Kraken, Mt. Gox exchanges are uneven at best

Open Source Initiative, Free Software Foundation unite against software ...
www.infoworld.com

In rare joint move, OSI and FSF come together to file a U.S. Supreme Court briefing

A Soviet-era hotel with clinical interiors and minimal service. Don't be deceived by the suggestion it has a "restaurant open until 10pm" - it was closed, and the staff were reluctant to help with anything much. When we ordered take out for our party in the absence of any service, the hotel staff tut-tutted us into a side room. Compared with other hotels in Ukraine this was expensive and unfriendly and I'd not stay here again.
Public - 2 months ago
reviewed 2 months ago
Great meal. Ideal portions of well-considered ingredient combinations. Excellent salads, lovely hangar steak. Dessert was good. The wine list was priced high and hard to scan because it is only available on an iPad, but we did discover a less-known Italian gem buried deep within. Overall an excellent meal.
Public - 4 months ago
reviewed 4 months ago
Great coffee in comfortable, relaxed surroundings with friendly staff.
Public - 11 months ago
reviewed 11 months ago
Tired, once grand hotel that manages to disappoint at every turn. Public areas are the best bits, but have the welcome of a station waiting room. Clientele appears to be dominated by coach parties, functions and the like. It was the conference hotel for an event I was attending, for example. Check-in staff were inexperienced and quite hard to deal with and seemed to expect advance payment. We stayed two nights in a small, hot, dirty room on the 5th floor with a badly maintained bathroom. [We note from the hotel history that the 5th & 6th floors were recently restored from a derelict state so it's possible lower rooms are better]. High hot water pressure and low cold water pressure made it almost impossible to shower without freezing or scalding. Carpet dirty and stained. Bed old, noisy and uncomfortable with inadequate linens. No air conditioning, dirty windows hard to open & no airflow. Curtains a poor fit. Room was not properly cleaned each day - towels on floor not changed, floor not cleaned, bed made over pyjamas etc etc. Huge queue for breakfast, which was typical greasy spoon fare from a buffet with tea served by friendly staff. Bars noisy with generic drinks only. Cash only, no room-charge or credit cards. At check-out, extra charge to pay by credit card! Turns out check-in did not record our car was parked in the (distant, expensive-for-open-air-on-street-insecure) car park so we had risked being ticketed. I would not recommend this hotel to anyone.
• • •
Atmosphere: Poor - FairDecor: Poor - FairService: Good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
19 reviews
Map
Map
Map
Expensive, better than some, still not the best. An unpretentious Parisian bar/brasserie more favoured by locals than the other tourist traps nearby. There was a good selection of food and drink which we generally enjoyed. Expensive for what we got though, and the restaurant does not make good its errors. For example, my wife's Tarte Tatin was burnt black, yet the waiter just shrugged it off when we pointed it out and made no attempt to address the problem or discount the bill. There are better options locally and you may prefer to choose them.
• • •
Public - 9 months ago
reviewed 9 months ago
This busy patisserie/boulangerie has a homely tea-room attached to it. We visited on a wet Saturday afternoon and had brunch - juice, bread, a croissant, coffee and a large egg-and-bacon roll served with salad and frites. Reasonable comfort food, needed more staff for the number of customers though.
Quality: GoodAppeal: GoodService: Poor - Fair
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Comfortable boutique hotel and gastro-pub in pretty location, slightly pricey but good for a short stay. We stayed two nights at this Inn, and enjoyed our stay. Our room was on the first-floor with a four-poster bed and a view out across Swaledale - very nice. The room was spacious, clean and elegant but lacked furniture - it really needed a comfy chair in which to relax plus a bigger wardrobe and a desk. The shower room was clean, comfortable and good - a great shower, good Molton-Brown toiletries and plenty of hot water. There was a kettle and supplies (good cookies!) and a tiny wall-mounted TV. The room was over the bar so noise persisted until after closing time (the staff unwind after closing). The hotel is located in Low Row, a village located a few miles west of Reeth and with good footpath access both to the fells and the river walks. All the beauty of Swaledale is within easy reach. We ate at the restaurant once. It's popular and busy and you will definitely need to make a reservation - preferably before you arrive if you want a choice of when you eat. The food was good but not exceptional and we (and other guests on both nights) found supplies of several dishes on the menu were restricted. The range of beers was OK with four real-ale hand-pumps and eight taps. The wine list was pub-scope so not huge and featured young wines. Prices for both the room and the food were mid-range for the area and seemed a little high for the actual facilities and quality. But we thoroughly enjoyed our stay and would recommend the place for a one or two night stay.
• • •
Quality: Very GoodFacilities: GoodService: Very Good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago