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Simon B
Works at Mobile Payments
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  • Mobile Payments
    Programme Manager, 2013 - present
  • Mobile Media Consultant/Business Development
    Mobile Media Consultant/Business Development, 2004 - 2012
  • Management Consultant
    Technical, Project and Management Consulting, 1998 - 2008
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Contrived stylistic self-promoting drivel goes here. Contributions welcome!
Introduction
My cover photo is from +Baldur McQueen

Be sure you've found the correct Simon - and if that didn't help you, then move along..  Or circle me anyway. -I don't reshare that much, but- I do comment wildly and widely.  I have recently discovered I do share quite often.  But it's only from a healthy sense of outrage.

My G+ Time-line

I've realised that the only websites I'd care to recommend are .org ones.  Except for this one http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6wXkI4t7nuc  I'm not sure what that says about it me, but I put it out there for you. 

If you're into maths, physics, biology, chemistry, computer science, FOSS, economics, flying, mobile web, politics, political science, religion, philosophy, carpentry, brewing and distilling, cricket, soccer, photography, demographics, hacking, social responsibility, or cheese, then circle me - because I will find you.
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Oh yay! Access :)

http://sci-hub.io/


A researcher in Russia has made more than 48 million journal articles - almost every single peer-reviewed paper every published - freely available online. And she's now refusing to shut the site down , despite a court injunction and a lawsuit from...
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Dear +Google Photos

Some feedback for you...
So, there are two issues here.
1) I NEVER agreed to Google sucking my photos off my devices!  I have never used the Android Photos app and I resent the fact that you have done this.  Please remove my personal photos from your servers and make this an opt-in feature.  (Obviously, I'm not including photos I have uploaded to Google+ posts).
2)  If I try to delete photos from https://photos.google.com/ I am told this will remove photos from my devices.  Again, you have zero permission to remove MY data from MY devices.  You need to provide an option to allow me to remove all my private photos from your server, without deleting them from my devices.

This is really shady.  Really, really shady..

#GooglePhotosSucks
#GoogleDontBeEvil
#Privacy  
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Simon B
 
On a positive note, one or two of the more prolific Googlers I follow, a) helped and b) directed more people to help to help me.

For which I'm very grateful.

The long and the short of it is, if you turn off sync on all the devices (I was able to force delete or freeze it), and then delete it from photos.google.com, you don't lose the ones on the device..
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This is inhumane.

They should at least replace the band with an alphanumeric tattoo on the forearm that can be hidden discreetly.

And put a sign up that says "work will set you free" above the door.
Refugees say they were forced to wear bands at all times in accommodation provided by Home Office contractor
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I always wanted a house by the sea. At this rate I'll be able to retire there without moving...

Also.. http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2013/03/18/notes-from-underground-3
 
Elizabeth Kolbert for The New Yorker:

We stopped in front of a four-story apartment building, which was surrounded by a groomed lawn. Water seemed to be bubbling out of the turf. Wanless took off his shoes and socks and pulled on a pair of polypropylene booties. As he stepped out of the car, a woman rushed over. She asked if he worked for the city. He said he did not, an answer that seemed to disappoint but not deter her. She gestured at a palm tree that was sticking out of the drowned grass.

“Look at our yard, at the landscaping,” she said. “That palm tree was super-expensive.” She went on, “It’s crazy—this is saltwater.”

“Welcome to rising sea levels,” Wanless told her.

According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, sea levels could rise by more than three feet by the end of this century. The United States Army Corps of Engineers projects that they could rise by as much as five feet; the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicts up to six and a half feet.

[...]

Globally, it’s estimated that a hundred million people live within three feet of mean high tide and another hundred million or so live within six feet of it. Hundreds of millions more live in areas likely to be affected by increasingly destructive storm surges.

[...]

Of all the world’s cities, Miami ranks second in terms of assets vulnerable to rising seas—No. 1 is Guangzhou—and in terms of population it ranks fourth, after Guangzhou, Mumbai, and Shanghai. A recent report on storm surges in the United States listed four Florida cities among the eight most at risk. (On that list, Tampa came in at No. 1.) For the past several years, the daily high-water mark in the Miami area has been racing up at the rate of almost an inch a year, nearly ten times the rate of average global sea-level rise.

[...]

When the system was designed—redesigned, really—in the nineteen-fifties, the water level in the canals could be maintained at least a foot and a half higher than the level of high tide. Thanks to this difference in elevation, water flowed off the land toward the sea. At the same time, there was enough freshwater pushing out to prevent saltwater from pressing in. Owing in part to sea-level rise, the gap has since been cut by about eight inches, and the region faces the discomfiting prospect that, during storms, it will be inundated not just along the coasts but also inland, by rainwater that has nowhere to go. Researchers at Florida Atlantic University have found that with just six more inches of sea-level rise the district will lose almost half its flood-control capacity. Meanwhile, what’s known as the saltwater front is advancing. One city—Hallandale Beach, just north of Miami—has already had to close most of its drinking wells, because the water is too salty. Many other cities are worried that they will have to do the same.

[...]

I asked everyone I met in South Florida who seemed at all concerned about sea-level rise the same question: What could be done? More than a quarter of the Netherlands is below sea level and those areas are home to millions of people, so low-elevation living is certainly possible. But the geology of South Florida is peculiarly intractable. Building a dike on porous limestone is like putting a fence on top of a tunnel: it alters the route of travel, but not necessarily the amount.

[...]

“I live opposite a park,” Philip Stoddard, the mayor of South Miami—also a city in its own right—told me. “And there’s a low area in it that fills up when it rains. I was out there this morning walking my dog, and I saw fish in it. Where the heck did the fish come from? They came from underground. We have fish that travel underground!

“What that means is, there’s no keeping the water out,” he went on. “So ultimately this area has to depopulate. What I want to work toward is a slow and graceful depopulation, rather than a sudden and catastrophic one.”

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/12/21/the-siege-of-miami?intcid=mod-most-popular
In the Miami area, the daily high-water mark has been rising almost an inch a year. Credit Illustration by Jacob Escobedo
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it floats Charlie! it ALL floats down here!
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Simon B

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I've got a good idea to boost the ratings.. +CNN
Put a hand gun on each podium (sponsored by the NRA)
But only 2 bullet-proof vests (preventative healthcare).

See what policy points are made...
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I like your idea!!
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Simon B

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I've always been hugely interested in physics from an astronomical point of view.

But this is the most accessible explanation of this you're going to read if you don't have a science degree. A degree. A high-school education..

Thank you +Yonatan Zunger
 
We have observed gravitational waves!

This morning, the LIGO observatory announced a historic event: for the very first time in history, we have observed a pair of black holes colliding, not by light (which they don't emit), but by the waves in spacetime itself that they form. This is a tremendously big deal, so let me try to explain why.

What's a gravitational wave?

The easiest way to understand General Relativity is to imagine that the universe is a big trampoline. Imagine a star as a bowling ball, sitting in the middle of it, and a spaceship as a small marble that you're shooting along the trampoline. As the marble approaches the bowling ball, it starts to fall along the stretched surface of the trampoline, and curve towards the ball; depending on how close it passes to the ball and how fast, it might fall and hit it. 

If you looked at this from above, you wouldn't see the stretching of the trampoline; it would just look black, and like the marble was "attracted" towards the bowling ball.

This is basically how gravity works: mass (or energy) stretches out space (and time), and as objects just move in what looks like a straight path to them, they curve towards heavy things, because spacetime itself is bent. That's Einstein's theory of Relativity, first published in 1916, and (prior to today) almost every aspect of it had been verified by experiment.

Now imagine that you pick up a bowling ball and drop it, or do something else similarly violent on the trampoline. Not only is the trampoline going to be stretched, but it's going to bounce -- and if you look at it in slow-motion, you'll see ripples flowing along the surface of the trampoline, just like you would if you dropped a bowling ball into a lake. Relativity predicts ripples like that as well, and these are gravitational waves. Until today, they had only been predicted, never seen.

(The real math of relativity is a bit more complicated than that of trampolines, and for example gravitational waves stretch space and time in very distinctive patterns: if you held a T-square up and a gravitational wave hit it head-on,  you would see first one leg compress and the other stretch, then the other way round)

The challenge with seeing gravitational waves is that gravity is very weak (after all, it takes the entire mass of the Earth to hold you down!) and so you need a really large event to emit enough gravity waves to see it. Say, two black holes colliding off-center with each other.

So how do we see them?

We use a trick called laser interferometry, which is basically a fancy T-square. What you do is you take a laser beam, split it in two, and let each beam fly down the length of a large L. At the end of the leg, it hits a mirror and bounces back, and you recombine the two beams.

The trick is this: lasers (unlike other forms of light) form very neat wave patterns, where the light is just a single, perfectly regular, wave. When the two beams recombine, you therefore have two overlapping waves -- and if you've ever watched two ripples collide, you'll notice that when waves overlap, they cancel in spots and reinforce each other in spots. As a result, if the relative length of the legs of the L changes, the amount of cancellation will change -- and so, by monitoring the brightness of the re-merged light, you can see if something changed the length of one leg and not the other.

LIGO (the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) consists of a pair of these, one in Livingston, Louisiana, and one in Hartford, Washington, three thousand kilometers apart. Each leg of each L is four kilometers long, and they are isolated from ambient ground motion and vibration by a truly impressive set of systems.

If a gravitational wave were to strike LIGO, it would create a very characteristic compression and expansion pattern first in one L, then the other. By comparing the difference between the two, and looking for that very distinctive pattern, you could spot gravity waves.

How sensitive is this? If you change the relative length of the legs of an L by a fraction of the wavelength of the light, you change the brightness of the merged light by a predictable amount. Since measuring the brightness of light is something we're really good at (think high-quality photo-sensors), we can spot very small fractions of a wavelength. In fact, the LIGO detector can currently spot changes of one attometer (10⁻¹⁸ of a meter), or about one-thousandth the size of an atomic nucleus. (Or one hundred-millionth the size of an atom!) It's expected that we'll be able to improve that by a factor of three in the next few years.

With a four-kilometer leg, this means that LIGO can spot changes in length of about one-quarter of a part in 10²¹. That's the resolution you need to spot events like this: despite the tremendous violence of the collision (as I'll explain in a second), it was so far away -- really, on the other end of the universe -- that it only created vibrations of about five parts in 10²¹ on Earth.

So what did LIGO see?

About 1.5 billion light years away, two black holes -- one weighing about 29 times as much as the Sun, the other 36 -- collided with  each other. As they drew closer, their gravity caused them to start to spiral inwards towards each other, so that in the final moments before the collision they started spinning around each other more and more quickly, up to a peak speed of 250 orbits per second. This started to fling gravity waves in all directions with great vigor, and when they finally collided, they formed a single black hole, 62 times the mass of the Sun. The difference -- three solar masses -- was all released in the form of pure energy.

Within those final few milliseconds, the collision was 50 times brighter than the entire rest of the universe combined. All of that energy was emitted in the form of gravitational waves: something to which we were completely blind until today.

Are we sure about that?

High-energy physics has become known for extreme paranoia about the quality of its data. The confidence level required to declare a "discovery" in this field is technically known as 5σ, translating to a confidence level of 99.99994%. That takes into account statistical anomalies and so on, but you should take much more care when dealing with big-deal discoveries; LIGO does all sorts of things for that. For example, their computers are set up to routinely inject false signals into the data, and they don't "open up the box" to reveal whether a signal was real or faked until after the entire team has finished analyzing the data. (This lets you know that your system would detect a real signal, and it has the added benefit that the people doing the data analysis never know if it's the real thing or not when they're doing the analysis -- helping to counter any unconscious tendency to bias the data towards "yes, it's really real!")

There are all sorts of other tricks like that, and generally LIGO is known for the best practices of data analysis basically anywhere. From the analysis, they found a confidence level of 5.1σ -- enough to count as a confirmed discovery of a new physical phenomenon.

(That's equal to a p-value of 3.4*10⁻⁷, for those of you from fields that use those)

So why is this important?

Well, first of all, we just observed a new physical phenomenon for the first time, and confirmed the last major part of Einstein's theory. Which is pretty cool in its own right.

But as of today, LIGO is no longer just a physics experiment: it is now an astronomical observatory. This is the first gravity-wave telescope, and it's going to let us answer questions that we could only dream about before.

Consider that the collision we saw emitted a tremendous amount of energy, brighter than everything else in the sky combined, and yet we were blind to it. How many more such collisions are happening? How does the flow of energy via gravitational wave shape the structure of galaxies, of galactic clusters, of the universe as a whole? How often do black holes collide, and how do they do it? Are there ultramassive black holes which shape the movement of entire galactic clusters, the way that supermassive ones shape the movement of galaxies, but which we can't see using ordinary light at all, because they aren't closely surrounded by stars?

Today's discovery is more than just a milestone in physics: it's the opening act of a much bigger step forward.

What's next?

LIGO is going to keep observing! We may also revisit an old plan (scrapped when the politics broke down) for another observatory called LISA, which instead of using two four-kilometer L's on the Earth, consists of a big triangle of lasers, with their vertices on three satellites orbiting the Sun. The LISA observatory (and yes, this is actually possible with modern technology) would be able to observe motions of roughly the same size as LIGO -- one attometer -- but as a fraction of a leg five million kilometers long. That gives us, shall we say, one hell of a lot better resolution. And because it doesn't have to be shielded from things like the vibrations of passing trucks, in many ways it's actually simpler than LIGO.

(The LISA Pathfinder mission, a test satellite to debug many of these things, was launched on December 3rd)

The next twenty years are likely to lead to a steady stream of discoveries from these observatories: it's the first time we've had a fundamentally new kind of telescope in quite a while. (The last major shift in this was probably Hubble, our first optical telescope in space, above all the problems of the atmosphere)

The one catch is that LIGO and LISA don't produce pretty pictures; you can think of LIGO as a gravity-wave camera that has exactly two pixels. If the wave hits Louisiana first, it came from the south; if it hits Washington first, it came from the north. (This one came from the south, incidentally; it hit Louisiana seven milliseconds before Washington) It's the shift in the pixels over time that lets us see things, but it's not going to look very visually dramatic. We'll have to wait quite some time until we can figure out how to build a gravitational wave telescope that can show us a clear image of the sky in these waves; but even before that, we'll be able to tease out the details of distant events of a scale hard to imagine.

You can read the full paper at http://journals.aps.org/prl/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.061102 , including all of the technical details. Many congratulations to the entire LIGO team: you've really done it. Amazing.

Incidentally, Physical Review Letters normally has a strict four-page max; the fact that they were willing to give this article sixteen pages shows just how big a deal this is.
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Simon B

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Nick Hardiman explains the seemingly arcane engineering of the IPv6 address. Find out what makes it tick.
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Dear +Ted Cruz

Dear friend, 
>> I am not, nor ever will be your friend. I wouldn't piss on you if you were on fire...


This is bad. 

I need your help immediately -- now more than ever. 

I don't have much time to explain...but here is -- the BREAKING 
NEWS directly from NBC, and it's not good. 

>> oh dear. You poor sap...

With just weeks before voting starts in Iowa and then New 
Hampshire, I am being heavily outspent by my opponents. Look at 
the new numbers NBC news just released below: 

-
Team Bush: $49 million ($47.5M from his Super PAC, $1.5M from the 
campaign) 

-
Team Rubio: $25.6 million ($9.3M from a 501c4, $9M from campaign, 
$7.3M from the Super PAC) 

-
Team Clinton: $13.8 million ($13.6M from her campaign, $199K from 
her Super PAC) 

-
Team Kasich: $10.1 million ($9.9M from outside groups, $208K from 
his campaign) 

>>  good Lord. If he's outspending you your campaign is on the rocks! :)

-
Team Sanders: $9.6 million (all from his campaign) 

<snip>



-
Team Cruz: $2 million ($1.3M from our campaign, the rest from super PACs)

<snip>


I'm personally writing you today to ask you to help me close
this HUGE spending gap with a special "Close the Gap" 
contribution to my campaign. 

Maybe +Patty Garza​ or +Pradheep Shanker​ can help you out :D


One last thing: I want you to know that my campaign has put 
together the best grassroots, on the ground, door-to-door and 
overall campaign organization in history. We have a HUGE 
advantage over these big spenders in shoe leather and campaign 
targeting. 

>> isn't it funny that your "best" grassroots campaign has managed to raise/spend 1/8th of +Bernie Sanders​'s grassroots campaign? :)



PAID FOR BY CRUZ FOR Guantanamo 
(Because this was all paid for by a PAC...



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Shoe leather? Man. If they're going door to door in old fashioned shoes, they're gonna get blisters...  I hope their campaign has enough to buy a whole lotta' moleskin...
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To a relative outsider the difference in tone between the Republican debates and the Democrat ones could not be greater.

I imagine it's greater still to someone not familiar with American politics.

My fear is that to Americans there's little if any difference.

The relative wings of the media do not help..

America, I really hope you find your way out of this mess.
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I can't share this with +Larry Fine​'s commentary. So I'll copy'n'paste...

There is nothing about this entire story, no single element of fact, no decision intermediate or final, no error, no denial of responsibility, no thoughtless and violent action undertaken with utter impunity, no violence against innocent children, that should not enrage you.  If you can read this and want to continue with the drug war, then you are a monster.

The emphasis is mine.
 
Drug warriors can endanger innocent people's lives through sloppy police work without committing a crime.
Nikki Autry claimed she lied on a search warrant affidavit by mistake.
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Simon B
 
Sure. It's the nature of the beast. The only possible deviation is occasional revolution (by which I don't mean armed rebellion).

However, a close look at the type of leaders we elect wouldn't go amiss.

A fish rots from the head, etc...
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I agree with much of what +Larry Fine​ has to say, but not this time..
Rosa Parks "needed" to sit at the front of the bus because the "law" that prohibited that was unconstitutional.

You don't "need" to own an AR-15 because your constitutional right to bear arms is fully satisfied by you pistol, your revolver, your hunting rifle and your shotgun.

I on the other hand "need" to know you're going to have to reload after 6-9 shots.
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