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Shava Nerad
Worked at Blackphone
Attended Massachusetts Institute of Technology
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Shava Nerad

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Get your online devotionals at a discount for Diwali. It's as though Rule 56 has started to apply to every dimension of human experience.

http://m.timesofindia.com/tech/tech-news/Spiritual-e-tailers-chant-profit-mantra/articleshow/44369529.cms
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Shava Nerad

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It went flat, and I put it in my pocket...
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not square root beer?
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I've been using FVD Speed Dial on M$ & Android, and they are bribing me to spread the word. But I do like it.  Firefox extension, has a sync extension that goes with it.  Highly rated.  No issues so far.
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FINALLY.  #nymwars #victory
After three years, Google finally got it. Google now admits it was wrong to require real names on Google Plus, and it’s apologized for taking so long, causing “unnecessarily difficult experiences for some of our users.” Too bad it had to learn the hard way, but better late than never.
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+Richard Lucas Did I say you did? But yes. You are being a poo-poo head.
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We end up with ingredients in the colors of the Mexican flag, ready to stuff first into tortillas, and then into our happy selves...
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Have her in circles
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People petition WH to equip all cops with nanny cams

Wow. Just wow. Such controversy. Much flameness. Comments of great dogeworthiness. Wow.

This is why +David Brin is wrong. No law such as this will ever pass (even given the right process of submission) and people including David have told us "Privacy is dead" so many years, people are willing to trade liberty for safety, and get the government they deserve in exchange.

No authority relinquishes power or exposes abuse without an existential stakes fight. It's asymmetrical and a huge big deal changing the culture around these issues.

#privacy #copwatch #ferguson

http://m.cnsnews.com/news/article/melanie-hunter/petition-calls-law-requiring-all-police-officers-wear-camera
In the wake of the shooting of an unarmed man by Ferguson, Mo., police, a petition has been started on the White House website requiring that all police officers wear a camera.
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Where has +David Brin said that "privacy is dead"? He describes the "privacy is dead" position as extreme and unhelpfully simplistic and argues that intelligent application of transparency can help us preserve important elements of privacy while guarding against toxic secrecy by various elites.

In his latest blog post, for example:

<quote> In one of life’s ironies, I am “Mister Transparency…” yet I believe some privacy can and should be preserved. A whole chapter of The Transparent Society is about how the only way we can preserve a little secluded intimacy or confidential sharing may be if we live in a society where most of the people know most of what’s going on, most of the time. Only such openness will stand a chance of deterring snoops and busybodies and peeping toms.

But some folks are far more transparency-radical! They “get” that all of our enlightenment innovations — like science, democracy, markets, justice, art and personal freedom thrive best in light… so they demand that it ALL be laid bare! As a moderate pragmatist (though perhaps a militant one) I find such zero-sum passion unnerving...

In fact, We do not have to choose between triplet fangs: Big Brother surveillance or stripped-naked little-brother coveillance, or (heaven forbid) the MYOB (mind your own business) rage of privacy "defenders" who just play into Big Brother's hands, by denouncing cartoon versions of transparency...

In fact, the society of nosy jerks portrayed in The Circle will not happen, because your neighbors would hate it just as much as you hate the thought of it!  Eggers's portrayal of his fellow humans and citizens is depressing not because it might come true, but because Eggers and the critics who praise him actually seem to believe (in their sanctimony) that their neighbors would put up with such a world... instead of using transparency and openness to catch the voyeurs and say "hey man!  Back off..."

There is hope.  If we insist on a general ability to see, that will include the ability to spot voyeurs.  If we start designing systems right, then we will be able to do what assertively brave humans have always been able to do, when some busybody stares.  Tell them: "Hey bub.... back off." </quote>

That is a much more nuanced and moderate position than "privacy is dead." That is a position that some people hold, but +David Brin is not one of them.
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A light weight correlation to the old saw that any innovation on the net is driven by porn first, I suppose...? Privacy innovation driven by online dating tech.
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Be safe
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Shava Nerad

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The WSJ Contemplates the Cost of NSA Complicity to US Big Data Companies

Oddly, that's not how they headlined the article. Heh.

But...ow.

#Snowden #bigdata #nsa
It’s been a persistent question ever since Edward Snowden revealed the NSA’s expansive spying operations just over a year ago: Have the disclosures damaged U.S. interests? A new report surveyed the revelations’ impact on U.S. businesses.
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+Jes Wulfsberg Nielsen Well certainly in Europe we simply can't host personal information outside their jurisdiction. That's expected. But not all data is personal.
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Hey, liberals, progressives -- what do you do if conservatives are born that way?

What if all the arguments in the world won't work?  If demonstrating the good work you can do with programs won't bear influence, and the lack of threat of foreign influences is...unthreatening?

What do you do, if a conservative voter in a democracy is born paranoid and xenophobic?

http://billmoyers.com/2014/07/17/scientists-are-beginning-to-figure-out-why-conservatives-are%E2%80%A6-conservative/
Ten years ago, it was wildly controversial to talk about psychological differences between liberals and conservatives. Today, it's becoming hard not to.
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more can be learned from research on why people believe research like this than from the research itself
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138 character short story

My recent tweet:

Kid comes up to ask what my big Note3 phablet is. I tell him I am turning 55 this month and this is the s5 large print edition. He nods.

#getoffmylawn
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(ツ)
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Shava Nerad

21C Workflow  - 
 
...wherein the path finds the student?

So, one day last week, I had The Call with my VP at Blackphone. The signs had been there all week, but I think he didn't realize FedEx delivers earlier on the east coast urban core than they tend to manage in the middle of San Francisco where he lives.

I'd gotten to stare down the early paycheck and the disbursement for paid time off through the end of this incomplete pay period an hour or two before the scheduled call. No pink slip or cover. But I had my suspicions all week. I told him, when I connected, "Let me make this easy -- I've been on your end of this and it sucks..."

Previous week they'd finally set me loose on the company blog. End of the week posts. Then a beginning of week. Then everything sat in review and odd silence. So it had to be a sudden decision, or they'd never have let me do the first posts after the ship announce.

It was a good ride, with good people. I believe the script says, "The conditions of my severance agreement forbid me from discussing details" except I believe it's just known that positions were cut in a restructure.

But in a few months I learned a great deal, including about how well and much I can work now. I am healthier (and yes, I do believe doctors treat you differently when you present as a professional rather than a pauper, having gone from one to the other like a dolphin recently).

I also gained a great deal of perspective and insight into the "privacy wars" raging on the wavefront, and deep in the ground swells of our obscurantist and divided, knowledge-casted culture.

I think it's time to take the show on the road. Watch this space. ;)
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+Shava Nerad, grateful and graceful... you are a woman on the move. Cheers to you and your indomitable spirit! 
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In which I say something good about Facebook's recent ad policy web-bug changes.  (And a couple not terribly good things.)  But it's important to share the good things when they do them, so more will come, and I think the good parts got lost, to a certain extent.

Also some staggering stats.  Yowza!
 
Behind the Privacy News:  Facebook's Ad Policy Changes

A bit ago, Facebook changed their ad policies, and the press went wild.  Why does an ad policy at Facebook make every media outlet go nuts?  Should you care?

One of our services at Blackphone will be to give you analysis behind the privacy news you'll see everywhere.

Facebook is, in a way, more of an open marketplace than eBay, which was conceived of as the bazaar or open square of the middle east.

Facebook is the center of social life and gossip, where merchants call for your attention from every little corner where they set up shop in the swirl of humanity.

CNBC had a great article on what that really means.[1]

Facebook has more monthly users than India – the worlds 2nd most populous country – has people. That's a billion more users than Twitter's 1.28 billion, in case you thought Twitter was coming up from behind.

And more than a billion of Facebookers, for the first time ever this year, are on mobile. That's one in seven people – more or less – on Earth.

It's not for the quality of the user-generated content on Facebook (I prefer g+).  But it does account for why advertisers want to know the demographics of that audience. That's a staggering slice of the global commercial public, and that demographic must have at least some money to spend, and some literacy.

Access to us pays for a lot of servers, staff, and paperclips at Facebook through ad sales.  The freemium model.

From an online marketer's point of view, Facebook is where to be – far more attractive in many ways than Google's AdWords, because Facebook's audience is emotionally engaged in content while they are on the site, which improves chances of getting us to notice an ad in their interest, over scanning a list of links in intellectual detachment.

Recently you may have seen a lot of news about how Facebook is putting web bugs on users, tracking their web browsing, and targeting ads to them based on that. But, they were quick to follow up, they are also giving users a lot of control over which ads they want to see, in which categories.

You can just go into Google News, there are thousands of articles on this. I encourage you to browse.

Facebook may be tracking users more, or they may just be talking more about the tracking they've been doing for a while. At the RSA conference last February, they were talking about how they were tracking users but only to customize their experience, not to serve ads.[2]  So although you might have thought this would have been in the works then -- it must be new.

On the other hand, they are doing something right – giving users more information on what's tracked and which ads will and will not be targeted to them. For the most part, you don't have that kind of control with advertising platforms such as Google AdWords, or most mobile advertising services. You see them, or you block them or ignore them.

This is a step in the right direction for big data freemium services. Clarity, transparency to the user base, and finer grained control mechanisms for users will keep users from using ad blockers, and keep government regulators at bay.

It's good to see a real giant like Facebook taking steps in this direction.

Traditionally, Facebook and Google have taken some tone-deaf steps on user privacy, sometimes leading to compromises in user security, and real embarrassment, PR disasters, and government fines. While the fines are largely symbolic on their bottom lines, they can't look good to their press and reputations.

For a freemium business, reputation is key to building and retaining a “cool factor” and audience. No market, no business. Our eyes, and dollars, go elsewhere.  So it's enlightened self interest to give control to us, their users.

Facebook gets fees from companies who gain access to their users as a gaming currency or advertising base, so the demographics – the targeting so that those companies don't waste paying Facebook fees to try to sell ads for games, products or services to poor prospects at a low return on their dollar – is the intel that gives them bragging rights and makes them a good deal to more and more businesses. And this is how they can afford to give users the largest free social network in the world.

I noticed over the past couple weeks that a few articles took it as news that Facebook does not honor “Do not track” browser requests from users. That's been true of Google and Facebook for some time. The claim from Google's senior policy counsel that “Do not track” requests confuse users falls a little short, and now, Facebook's panelist's claim in February that they only use the data for experience enhancement – when this decision was obviously in the works at that time – seems a little coy, but was likely honoring confidential company plans.

If other big data freemium companies are smart, they'll invest more in programs that are more transparent and give the user more control over their own preferences and data, and educate users on what they sign on for, and what the value of privacy exchanged for services is, at every stage.

--
Shava Nerad
Privacy Evangelist
Blackphone
SGP Technologies




[1]http://www.cnbc.com/id/101611586
[2]http://www.forbes.com/sites/eliseackerman/2013/02/27/big-internet-companies-struggle-over-proper-response-to-consumers-do-not-track-requests/
Say hello to seven remarkable social media factoids.
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and stold facebook from others back in college
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Work
Occupation
Memetic bard, privacy/security policy, executive management, ghost writing, speech writing, social media, policy, campaign management, marketing, training, strategy, leadership training (more, see LinkedIn) Also a maker -- millinery, scrimshaw, costuming, and fripperies.
Skills
Polymath and autodidact. Do you need me to learn something, do something, analyze something, or teach?
Employment
  • Blackphone
    Privacy Evangelist, 2014 - 2014
Basic Information
Gender
Female
Other names
Shava Suntzu in Second Life, shava23 nearly anywhere online
Story
Tagline
Memetic Bard
Introduction
I'm a polymath geek, consulting in the Boston area.  I've worked online thirty years -- look me up on LinkedIn.  Currently seeking short term writing/consulting while I organize #bluerosemovement.

I have a son at Norwich University in the Corps of Cadets, and live in Salem MA with a small dog named George and a magician named Fish -- which is very different from a fish named Wanda.

My elderly mom, who was studying botany at UCLA way back in the 30s, inspired by Madame Curie, and was also a union activist.  She very recently went into nursing care, and every Friday morning, when possible, is sacred to her.  I have breakfast, and give her my despatches from the field.  I come by the grrl geek thing by birth.  Also the fierce little beast! :)

I also got that from my dad, who's been gone over a decade now, and was a Unitarian Universalist minister, a math and science teacher, a machinist and a chemist.  My folks met through my mom's union activist half-brother, fell in love, and were married a few weeks later.  They were in love for 56 years when my dad died.  He was a lifelong learner, a lifelong teacher, a lifelong organizer, mentor, and strategic thinker.  He worked with the SCLC and Dr. King on the summer marches and organized civil rights and civil liberties and other causes locally. 
Bragging rights
As of spring 2012, thirty years working online mostly in public interest internet; founding executive director, The Tor Project
Education
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    course six (non student resident assn), 1978 - 1982
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