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Sharon Salzberg
352 followers -
Meditation Teacher & Author
Meditation Teacher & Author

352 followers
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Enjoy an exclusive sneak peak of #RealLoveBook now available in Tricycle: The Buddhist Review!
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The Buddha’s Five Protections: Part 1 by Sharon Salzberg

As we look around, it’s very clear that in this world people do outrageous things to one another all of the time. It’s not that these qualities or actions make us bad people, but they bring tremendous suffering if we don’t know how to work with them. We can see the consequences of our actions clearly, and know that the things we care about, the things we do, really matter.
If we have a very strong commitment, so that we can trust ourselves and be beacons of trust for others no matter what the circumstance, then we’re protected from suffering the consequences of many actions. We can be protected from that pain.
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Cool Revolution: Transforming Anger by Sharon Salzberg & Ethan Nictern

Ordinarily, we tend to think of pacifism, like kindness and empathy, as a form of weakness. But that misses our need to take a good look at what strength really is. It is possible to be absolutely committed to stopping abuse or injustice and protecting the injured, while tempering outrage with compassion.

My Friend Ethan Nichtern, founder of the Interdependence Project, a non-profit dedicated to Buddhist-inspired meditation and mindfulness in psychology, activism, media, and the arts, has written eloquently about why we are often blocked in maintaining this fine balance. If we examine the view of human nature that lies beneath our social niceties, Ethan points out, we find “a fearful sense of what it means to be human.” According to the prevailing Western philosophical perspective, put forth most pessimistically by Thomas Hobbes in the 17th century, human beings are naturally inclined to a “war of all against all.” Ethan lists “three S’s” that, in this view, characterize us above all: Separate, Selfish, and Scared. Dominated by this philosophy, he explains, life becomes “a perpetual battle against the Other, a self-absorbed and fearful fight to protect ourselves and our families against constant threats.”

Ethan offers an alternative perspective for a wholly different, more fulfilled and effective life, defined by three C’s: Connection, Compassion, and Courage.

Read More: http://goo.gl/Suo4T0
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Meditation: The Key to #Resilience in Caregiving by Sharon Salzberg

As I look forward to co-leading this retreat, People Who Care for People: Tools for #Resiliency at the Garrison Institute, I find myself reflecting on caregivers I know. Some practice #caregiving professionally, as nurses, first responders, chaplains, non-profit attorneys; others in their personal lives, as parents, children, siblings, friends. As difficult and pressured as caring for others can be, as tiring and overwhelming as it often becomes, many express a very powerful happiness at being able to serve.

An important element in how we keep going is being able to touch that happiness, broadening our perspective beyond what we see just in front of us, reminding us of our deepest motivation and what we care about most. In a challenging environment, facing our own or others’ suffering, we need to draw on inner resources.

Whether you care for a young child, an aging parent, a difficult-to-understand teenager, a client at work with no clear resolution to their problems in sight, any skillful relationship of #caregiving relies on balance — the balance between opening one’s heart endlessly and accepting the limits of what one can do.

Read More: http://goo.gl/yizxRi
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